The Worldwide Bank Crash has Commenced

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posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 04:10 AM
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Did a search...but didnt come up as posted.

This could be a telltale sign the global economic trough is becoming empty...
www.stankovuniversallaw.com...

"HSBC, the biggest British bank and second biggest company on the British Stock Exchange (FTSE 100 Index) with a capitalisation of 102,7 billion British pounds on July 6, 2012, is obviously bankrupt.

This is the beginning of the worldwide financial collapse that will start with a bank crash and closure of all major banks worldwide in August 2013 as predicted by myself in a series of articles on the final ascension scenario, the latest one as of yesterday...follow the link to read more.

This sounds pretty serious...what do you think ATSers...got something to do with the embassy closings ya think?

www.youtube.com...=22

Hope ya got some precious metals...paper fiat currency worth is dissolving before our eyes.
edit on 5-8-2013 by Mythkiller because: (no reason given)
edit on 5-8-2013 by Mythkiller because: (no reason given)
edit on 5-8-2013 by Mythkiller because: trying to get vid to work $#@%
edit on 5-8-2013 by Mythkiller because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 04:25 AM
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reply to post by Mythkiller
 


If this is true it is going to get very nasty very quickly worldwide, scary times ahead.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 04:55 AM
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Originally posted by Mythkiller
"HSBC, the biggest British bank and second biggest company on the British Stock Exchange (FTSE 100 Index) with a capitalisation of 102,7 billion British pounds on July 6, 2012, is obviously bankrupt.




I dont follow the guy's logic at all.

He appears to be saying:
1. HSBC wont continue being the bank for the same type of organisations previously found to be at risk of money laundering,

2. therefore

3. they are "obviously bankrupt", and the worldwide crash has started.


Would you perhaps care to expand on point 2?



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 05:57 AM
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reply to post by Mythkiller
 



How are they bankrupt?


Pre-tax profit at the bank rose 10% to $14.1bn (£9.2bn), despite a 7% drop in revenues to just under $35bn.

HSBC profits rise....

They are not bankrupt or at least I have not seen real evidence of it, they are cutting jobs and scrapping business but that is due to inefficiency as they say.

Also I cannot see how HSBC trying to clear it's image and do safer banking has anything to do with worldwide financial collapse or the closing of embassies.

Just think a second about which embassies are closed right now and who has been told to take their business elsewhere.

I agree with alfa1 I am not following your logic on this.
edit on 5-8-2013 by RAY1990 because: (no reason given)


So my hypothesis is: this is a dirty bank that is trying to bathe the crap off itself, nothing more than that. And most likely NOT a world wide financial collapse, I may be wrong.... we'll see in less than a month though eh?
edit on 5-8-2013 by RAY1990 because: spelling corrections and more to add.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 06:22 AM
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reply to post by Mythkiller
 


From the Source Article:

This same bank has been involved in the last decades in virtually every possible major scandal, crime and fraud in the banking sector that one can conceive  - from rigging libor interest rates, laundering mafia and narco traffic dollars from all over the world, and especially from South and Central America, but also Asia, to insider trading, tax evasion, etc., etc. It is the classical Orion bank of the British ruling Reptilian elite around the Rothschild family and its true name is  ”High Society British Crime” bank.

Anyone who talks about the "Reptilian elite"...loses credibility with me.
Not that the article is far off, or far from the truth about this banks imminent failure...
I just don't buy into that particular theory about a reptilian race of people.
It is a tad bit too far-fetched for me.

Now as for HSBC being an evil bank with massive ties to world-wide corruption...

That is a theory I can sink my teeth into.




edit on 5-8-2013 by havok because: fixed bbcode



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 06:31 AM
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reply to post by havok
 





Not that the article is far off, or far from the truth about this banks imminent failure... I just don't buy into that particular theory about a reptilian race of people. It is a tad bit too far-fetched for me. Now as for HSBC being an evil bank with massive ties to world-wide corruption... That is a theory I can sink my teeth into.


I'm interested, how do you see HSBC failing soon?

I cannot see it happening soon myself. If it did then it's only going to make the other big banks richer. Isn't this bank too big to fail?

Agreed about the reptilian race thing
though I do know HSBC is filled with cold-blooded bankers.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 06:38 AM
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Originally posted by havok
Anyone who talks about the "Reptilian elite"...loses credibility with me.


I agree completely.
The moment someone starts on about Reptilians, or even anything Alex Jones has been ranting about over the years, their credibility is completely destroyed.

There is no evidence I can see to support the scenario proposed in the OP.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by Mythkiller
 


With all the money HSBC launders for Mexican cartels & Al Qaeda I doubt they're bankrupt or going bankrupt.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 09:35 AM
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HSBC will be around longer than any of us, far in to the future, its not bankrupt, its far from it, there is no collapse, as said other banks would just get richer anyway, we will always have banks.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by Mythkiller
 


I am curious do you sell precious metals for a living? I always see threads like these and wonder who will benefit from this if there is a real panic.

Personally metals and money will both be worthless if there is a collapse and the average person has very little other than luck to float this out. Now if they have been stocking and getting self-sufficient they should buffer just fine!



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by RAY1990
 


If this article has any truth in the details...

What this bank has just done, is without a precedent in the banking history: HSBC has announced that it has decided to close without any previous warning the bank accounts of forty major diplomatic missions and embassies worldwide, including the Vatican, without giving any explanation for this unique move. Thus, this bank has practically disconnected its clients from the financial system in an blatant contradiction to its company motto.

That paragraph is alarming.
If you cut out that many accounts, largest by far...somethin's a brewing...and it ain't coffee.
These are the most valuable accounts, in my opinion, and have the most assets.
National governments, big corporations..... THE VATICAN!
Like I said, if this article has any remote truth to it, failure seems inevitable.

Problem is, sorting the truth from the make-believe.






posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by havok
 


When people say they find things too far fetched, I certainly have to roll my eyes, at the censorship they have been programmed with.

However this is looked at, far-fetched is usually where a lot of the reality lies.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 11:44 AM
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Yes, if the worlds banks collapse, then having 'money' in the form of 'minerals' will do nobody any good whatsoever. Why is anybody going to exchange valuable food for worthless metals?

If one was going to save in case of a world collapse scenario, I think they'd be much better off putting their money into a good home canning operation instead, or freeze-drying large stockpiles of food.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 11:47 AM
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Barclays recently made a load of new shares because they didn't have enough cash for the new regulations that required them to have at least 12 billion....I closed my account and went for a more local building society.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by abeverage
 

The monetary collapse has been predicted for some years now by the likes of Ron Paul, Peter Schiff, Jim Rogers, Marc Faber etc.

In 2008, many of these banks had failed and would no longer exist had they not been bailed out by the "Federal Reserve".

But no one can give an accurate time table as to the next financial Armageddon, though they all agree its coming.

However, it would make sense from a timing perspective with the latest Al-CIAeda warning, typical distraction techniques.

With regards to precious metals, their value could go either way. As people lose more confidence in fiat currency, they will buy hard assets with intrinsic value.

On the other hand, if people's savings are wiped out or their currency no longer has buying power, metal prices may drop not due to lack of demand but simply because people dont have the means to purchase.

Guess we'll have to wait and see.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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This global meltdown has been predicted on ATS since Dec 2004.
Where is it?
Prediction - Fail
Prediction - Fail
Prediction - Fail

I'm tapping my foot.
I'm yawning.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by alfa1

Originally posted by Mythkiller
"HSBC, the biggest British bank and second biggest company on the British Stock Exchange (FTSE 100 Index) with a capitalisation of 102,7 billion British pounds on July 6, 2012, is obviously bankrupt.




I dont follow the guy's logic at all.

He appears to be saying:
1. HSBC wont continue being the bank for the same type of organisations previously found to be at risk of money laundering,

2. therefore

3. they are "obviously bankrupt", and the worldwide crash has started.


Would you perhaps care to expand on point 2?


So obviously a tool of the PTB, anti every conspiracy on here, I have no idea why the members have not hounded you off this site.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by PlanetXisHERE
 


So if you don't believe in outlandish claims like the in the OP then you shouldn't be on this site? What are you guys only looking for people to agree with you? Hard to deny ignorance when no one questions the stories. As far as the OP is concerned, this article claims a tall order and hasn't really provided anything more than conjecture that it is true. So basically, I'll believe it when I see it.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by ParasuvO
reply to post by havok
 


When people say they find things too far fetched, I certainly have to roll my eyes, at the censorship they have been programmed with.

However this is looked at, far-fetched is usually where a lot of the reality lies.


"Reptilian race of elites" is far-fetched. I'm yet to see concrete proof besides more low quality youtube videos with the author crying about "slit eyes" or "shapeshifters" all crazed and hyped up. Not to mention the lack of "gills". I don't believe in this theory. Maybe I'm just sane?

Had the author just said: a race of "money hungry, corruption-laden-filthists" I'd retract my post.
That must be just what I call them. Not reptilians.

Apparently the belief in reptilians is the norm?
Strike me as dumbfounded.






posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:22 PM
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This was written in 2002. Maybe they won’t get away with it this time.

The price of gold and gold stocks is sky-rocketing with Central banks across the world coming in for severe criticism for the way they have sold official gold reserves, although in a disguised form. Maree Howard writes.

One of the biggest financial scandal stories, on the level of Enron, is about to break.

Central banks are said to have lent their gold for about 1% per annum - the cheapest borrowed money on earth. They have not reported these loans as sales meaning their official gold reserves remain constant. But the leased gold is gone.

It has been borrowed by large trading companies called bullion banks. They borrowed at 1%, sold the gold, took the money they earned by selling the gold and invested it at 5% or more.

It was sweet multi-billion dollar deal. But now they are in a squeeze.

They owe billions of dollars of gold bullion to Central banks but to get it back, they must buy gold bullion in the open market, which is now a rising market.

They are losing money, big time.

What has saved them so far is that the Central banks are not demanding repayment. Meanwhile the public doesn't know that the leased gold is gone. The Central banks do no publish these figures.

Then there are the "direct" sales of gold by the Central banks. The most recent sales were made by the Bank of England. It sold off at least half of its gold reserves over a 3-year period ending in March. The man responsible for the decision to sell the gold is Gordon Brown, the Chancellor of the Exchequer. He has now come under fire for having made horrendous investment decisions.

The British Independent newspaper published the story on May 26.

In part that paper says "Gordon Brown has "lost" 400 million pounds by ordering the sale of part of Britain's gold reserves by the Bank of England....."

"Figures obtained by the Independent on Sunday also show that his decision to order the Bank of England to part with some of its gold reserves and switch into Euro and yen was also not a good bet for the taxpayer. The value of gold has soared on world markets as investors have switched to gold."

Of course, major Central bankers have a real problem. When the public learns that the Central bank's gold leasing programme has turned into an unannounced gold sales programme, with the bullion banks in cahoots with the Central banks, and the bullion banks can't repay the central banks, heads are going to roll.

A rising price of gold threatens to bankrupt the bullion banks who dare not go into the market to buy gold for fear if what this will do to increase gold's price.

So it's a waiting game. The bullion banks are hoping the price will go down and so are the Central bankers, But, at some point, the Central bankers will have to demand repayment. At that point the gold leasing game will end.

The bullion banks will go bust, the Central banks won't be repaid and the public will find out - once again - that they might not be able to trust Central banking.

Will gold's price fall back below the bottom of $US256? This now seems highly unlikely given the head of steam under which gold is now rising.

Of course, this all depends on whether Central banks go for one last sell-off to again artificially keep the price down.

With the Federal Reserve system expanding credit money in the U.S. to push down short-term interest rates, and with a recession in capital investing still in force, the question is: Where can I make a better rate of return than in gold?

This year, gold has beaten all other investment categories. Gold investors have to search long and hard to find a better rate of return.

Only if they think the price has peaked would they want to sell. But there is little evidence yet that gold's price has peaked. In fact, the scene looks set for a dramatic price increase.

Even the predictable threat of the Bundesbank in early April to sell gold - no amount specified - in 2004 has had no downward effect on gold's price.

Are investors likely to sell now than in the past? No. Because there are no clear cut alternatives. Not selling, of course, reduces the supply of available gold at any price.

One of the biggest buyers of gold traditionally is the Indian father (Patel not Tonto) who has been in the market for a thousand years buying gold for the daughterís dowry. Why would he now want to sell traditional gold in order to buy conventional rupee "paper-moneyî investments in such a war scenario which exists on that sub-continent?

Then there is Japan with its increasing demand for gold. And the Central bank of China has been accumulating more gold in recent months than was believed likely.

So the upward pressure on gold's price seems to be from the supply side - i.e. reduced supplies of ready sellers are leading to higher prices.


Gold mining firms burdened with forward contracts set at a lower price see losses ahead when they have to sell a commodity on the back of rising prices. This is really going to hurt those mines that are loaded up with obligations to sell at a fixed price. They will face a profit squeeze and are less likely to add to their positions of forward sales.

I don't expect a gold-rush on Wall Street. They are too conventional and too closely allied to the highest levels of Central banks and bullion banks. Wall Street is the Establishment. In fact, I expect to see a propaganda campaign to try and take the head of steam out of gold and to prop up their ailing financial system.

There is a long-term re-education process head because gold has been under-attack ever since 1914 when European Central banks ceased to redeem their gold certificates and their Government's authorised this massive confiscation of private wealth. The U.S. joined in but it re-established convertibility after the war ended. Europe didn't, except Britain on 1925, at a pre-war price that could not be maintained without deflation - which the economy got. Britain went off the gold standard in 1931 and the U.S. followed in 1933.

As the truth about the one-way direction of the Central banks' gold leasing programmes becomes clearer to the public and they recognise the statistical fraud - that the gold is gone and won't be coming back - the upward pressure on gold's price will accelerate. The chickens are finally coming home to roost!






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