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Anonymous Web-host shut down, owner arrested; Tor users compromised by Javascript exploit

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posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by Dragoon01

Originally posted by DYepes
First off, that really sucks for anyone who left Java activated. It does specifically outline that doing so will make the machine vulnerable. Java is butt, it has screwed up this damn site with its weird ads as well. I like browsing ATS with tor just so it kills all the ads. I cannot post though, as I stated in my sig. Some have said how slow browsing with Tor is, but I have found it speeds up my visits to many sites. I like it because I can skip all the garbage Java ads on this and many other sites that practically freeze up and constantly crash my IE. Hell when I use IE on this site alone, I crash about 35-40% of the time at some point in my visit. Real pain in the arse that is. I also like to keep the trackers disabled because I am tired of targeted advertisement, it feels like the mirror is staring back know what I mean?

And the second and MAIN point I would like to make, In YO FACE to all the fools hailing bitcoin as some kind of renaissance and future of currency. I cannot for the life of me ever understand why anyone would have put in any faith in a virtual currency that had no kind of stability to begin with. Might as well buy World of Warcraft money or any other currency from a video game.
edit on 8/4/2013 by DYepes because: (no reason given)





And yet you carry around a virtual currency in your pocket everyday....Your money is just paper backed up by "faith and credit" whats the difference?


Obviously the poster you replied to has no idea how Crypto Currency, or maybe even how or what currency and money actually is and it's purpose. The following is for everyones general knowledge:

People can put value in anything. Currency is just a medium utilized in any type of exchange.
BitCoin doesn't make sense to people because they don't understand how BitCoin has value.
Although the details can be confusing, it really comes down to this - BitCoin obtains it's primary value from the work computers do (and by proxy the work people do in building the computers and making them function) and the electricity used to power the computers who mine the bitcoins.

You are taking power (actual electricity) and using mathematics and computing power to 'mine' (or calculate) complex algorithms that when solved, present you with a BitCoin (or a solution). There are only so many BitCoins, which is a good thing (because when they have all been mined, they cannot inflate anymore).
They are anonymous (untraceable to a person), and verifiable, so they cannot be forged (there were some issues previously, but it appears they may have them worked out finally).

They aren't managed by a "Central Bank", they cannot be manipulated, the market drives their demand and market value, and a bunch of other great reasons. The volatility in the BitCoin market is pretty standard for any non-central manged currency system - ever. US Markets did the same thing before the incorporation of the Federal Reserve in 1913.

Anyway, BitCoins are great technology and I'm surprised more people in this forum don't use them.
Shocked, actually.




posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 12:43 PM
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You do not need Tor or any other anonymizer to communicate anonymously. You don't even need encryption. Why even bother with a zillion unsecured wireless networks. WEP or WPA are both insecure, don't even think they are.

Just change your MAC to a generic one and connect to an unprotected wireless network and there is your anonymity. Need security? Well, use steganography. Nothing beats hiding your secrets in plain sight.

If you must use a VPN, use OpenVPN with your own private certificates. Don't bother with the official CAs.

And use a secure browser profile for crying out loud.

It's not about hiding or concealing, it's about protecting your right to privacy. And those are totally different things.
edit on 5-8-2013 by RageAgainstFascism because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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The government is plugging the web and prepping it for war or some disaster like the kill shot. They need to plug the deep web and de-anonymize everyone. Its the only way they can control "the message" and attempt to manufacture support for the coming war.

Think about everything that has happened over the past few years as preparation for war or for a major disaster. Everything is falling into place, Let's examine the checklist

Kill switch the internet, plug the deep web, stores of ammo, fema/prison/internment camps for the millions of Muslims-Americans, get rid of don't ask don't tell and women in combat so they can draft everyone, and they released the cover story about Pakistani softball sized nukes to cover the next false flag.

I suspect the planned ammo buys by DHS might be for a contingency plan where the US is invaded and the citizens are armed by DHS.

Remember, Seal team 6, they didn't kill Osama, they went in to retrieve some nukes, perhaps some of those softball nukes for the next false flag, then they were silenced, or perhaps they became sick from radiation and were disposed. Radiological "evidence" will point to Pakistan as being the builder of the bombs.

Also, Snowden has to have been spying for the Russians. And it was the Russians who killed the Ambassador to try to expose Benghazi gun running.

Here's where it is interesting. Everyone knows Nostradamus, right?

Century 2, Quatrain 62
Mabus will soon die, then will come,
A horrible undoing of people and animals,
Suddenly one will see vengeance,
100 hands , thirst , hunger , when the comet will run.

MABUS = AMBUS = AMB is the abbreviation for Ambassador = Ambassador US

Ambassador Stevens was killed and Comet ISON is running

Hold onto your britches.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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This reminds me of the AnonymousOS I recently d/l'd just for the fun of it. I had no trust in what it would do so put it on a virgin PC and let it fly with a dummy web server. It tried to hook up to all sorts of places on its own. Had 7 tty channels open and constant try to connect.
For the Tor, well, java is so imbedded into most web sites, its hard to not use it. When it is turned off, they complain. So damned if you do, damned if you don't. Wonder if we can sue the hell out of the owner of java for breach of contract. They said it was safe didn't they?



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by zeeon
 


I have a question and it's a sincere one.

Isn't the whole concept of anonymity just about blown to pieces once you've made payment for the VPN? I imagine we're not talking about meeting someone face to face in a dark alley somewhere to hand over untraceable cash, right? So, how isn't it signing your name at the VPN stage by the payment process?

As recent cases have shown? The USG can and will raid operations just about anywhere in the world on things like this. Europe..Asia.. doesn't seem to matter or give people running large P2P or other services any security for their own side of it.

Point being..the VPN wouldn't have to willingly compromise anyone. They just need the shock and awe of a tactical team kicking their doors and seizing everything related to a computer in sight...don't they?



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:28 PM
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Direct to the NSA.



Malware planted on the servers of Freedom Hosting—the "hidden service" hosting provider on the Tor anonymized network brought down late last week—may have de-anonymized visitors to the sites running on that service. This issue could send identifying information about site visitors to an Internet Protocol address that was hard-coded into the script the malware injected into browsers. And it appears the IP address in question belongs to the National Security Agency (NSA).

This revelation comes from analysis done collaboratively by Baneki Privacy Labs, a collective of Internet security researchers, and VPN provider Cryptocloud. When the IP address was uncovered in the JavaScript exploit—which specifically targets Firefox Long-Term Support version 17, the version included in Tor Browser Bundle

arstechnica.com...
[/ex[



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


That is how I always thought about VPN personally. It's not too hard to find a new "proxy" (misconfigured server) to use when you need that extra hop. But on the other side, how many of those proxies are really honeypots designed to try and capture whatever data it can? I know for a fact that is the very reason a lot of those web proxies exist(beat your facebook block with our web proxy!), to steal whatever data they can....
edit on Mon, 05 Aug 2013 13:36:44 -0500 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by roadgravel
 


Firefox now states that if you own the older versions of the firefox you would likely to get affected by this supposed Javascript exploit they then stated, if you have the version of 22, the least one you wont get affected unless you visit the already exploited affected sites.

Still what the FBI/NSA have done is completely an outrage rather then searching for the new terrorist threat terrorists they are wasting public and overreach of powers on searching users whom are using an Anonymous browser?

May i add how stupid is this?


If few Anonymous/Onion sites get affected or close down then what they are targeting isn't CP but anti government activists.



Even if some users on TOR did visit those sites surely they cant go all down and lock them down? thats over stepping of powers.
edit on 5-8-2013 by Agent_USA_Supporter because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:48 PM
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reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 




Even if some users on TOR did visit those sites surely they cant go all down and lock them down? thats over stepping of powers.


Maybe bonus points since some are speculating it is psyops to create fear for TOR.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


You need to research thoroughly which VPN service you choose.

VPN providers are bound by the laws of the country in which they have their servers...so for instance, if you sign up to a vpn server based in....Sweden (i think Sweden is correct) where there is no legal requirement for a vpn provider to keep a log of who connects to the service, or when, or what they did when connected, you might be able to find one that doesnt. (keep a log i mean)

So, every time you connect to your vpn, you are issued with a session ID number that identifies your account to your usage, but that is deleted when you close the session, and then probably immediately issued to the next person logging on to the vpn service.

This means that anyone looking at connections could possibly see that an IP address coming from the VPN was connected to a particular website, but when they produce their warrants for the record of the VPN provider to find out which user was assigned that IP address on this date at that time....no record exists...sorry officer we have no legal requirement to keep that information, and no space on our servers to store it...so we just delete it.

More info on protecting yourself on line here
edit on 5-8-2013 by idmonster because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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They put out the Firefox tor bundle hacked by the FBI over a year ago. Firefox has had a lawsuit in the courts trying to make them stop illegally using there browser to entrap people. So why is it breaking new to people now? Every feel like deja vu?



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:09 PM
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Never underestimate what can happen as you cross network paths in the USA.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:12 PM
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Originally posted by MidnightTide
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


People just have to understand this isn't the movies - you will be tracked and what you do on the net will be monitored. Perhaps this is a good thing, perhaps people will stop this anonymous protesting and will actually start doing SOMETHING for real.


My thoughts exactly! Hiding isn't much of a stand. Of course, hackers have to be anonymous, but protesting in masks is not the way forward. We need to practice civil resistance if we're going to get anywhere, like Gandhi did. Maybe form a circle around government, get as many cameras on it as possible for YouTube and as much media attention as possible. Everyone will be arrested and hopefully not nicely (we all know about the mistreatment of protestors in many public events but most people are still mainstream-minded and need to see more of it.) Like soldiers, people who care about the rights and freedoms of their countries and their children need to make a stand for the Greater Good.

As for this FreedomWeb shutdown, it's hard to say if or how child pornography was involved. If they really were involved with it, then I'm glad they were taken down and I hope they get the book thrown at them. If it was a setup or an exaggeration (one or two people using FreedomWeb might have hosted sites with illegal images unbeknownst to them for all we know,) then it's more of the same BS and corruption that we've been used to. Either way, this probably has more to do with fighting truth-seeking hackers and whistleblowers than anything else. The big bankers no doubt wanted Bitcoin stopped. There is no law against it yet and anyone can start a new online currency, but they no doubt want it crushed and they probably have Zionist lobbyists in goverment officials' faces right now to entice them to legislate online currency away. I'm not sure how this could be possible, because tickets and fake money (from Monopoly to Disney World) is popular, but I'd bet anyone that they'll either find a way to stop it or take control over all online currency.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:14 PM
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Since Freedom Hosting is known for harboring neonazi websites and child porn, it isn't much of a loss.

Although we can't thank the FBI for this, since this is in itself a criminal organization under the cover of the Law, that entrapped many innocent people into heavy prison sentences.


Just a bigger evil fighting a smaller one.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by Echtelion
 


If people are starting to bless and glorify FBI maybe we should be thanking the NSA to this is the exactly the reaction they wanted out of this, and all this on Obama's birthday.


Just making an note.
edit on 5-8-2013 by Agent_USA_Supporter because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by LoneCloudHopper2

Originally posted by MidnightTide
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


People just have to understand this isn't the movies - you will be tracked and what you do on the net will be monitored. Perhaps this is a good thing, perhaps people will stop this anonymous protesting and will actually start doing SOMETHING for real.


My thoughts exactly! Hiding isn't much of a stand. Of course, hackers have to be anonymous, but protesting in masks is not the way forward. We need to practice civil resistance if we're going to get anywhere, like Gandhi did. Maybe form a circle around government, get as many cameras on it as possible for YouTube and as much media attention as possible. Everyone will be arrested and hopefully not nicely (we all know about the mistreatment of protestors in many public events but most people are still mainstream-minded and need to see more of it.) Like soldiers, people who care about the rights and freedoms of their countries and their children need to make a stand for the Greater Good.

As for this FreedomWeb shutdown, it's hard to say if or how child pornography was involved. If they really were involved with it, then I'm glad they were taken down and I hope they get the book thrown at them. If it was a setup or an exaggeration (one or two people using FreedomWeb might have hosted sites with illegal images unbeknownst to them for all we know,) then it's more of the same BS and corruption that we've been used to. Either way, this probably has more to do with fighting truth-seeking hackers and whistleblowers than anything else. The big bankers no doubt wanted Bitcoin stopped. There is no law against it yet and anyone can start a new online currency, but they no doubt want it crushed and they probably have Zionist lobbyists in goverment officials' faces right now to entice them to legislate online currency away. I'm not sure how this could be possible, because tickets and fake money (from Monopoly to Disney World) is popular, but I'd bet anyone that they'll either find a way to stop it or take control over all online currency.


So then only State agents have the privilege to hide and be anonymous?

I think you have neglected this issue. Anonymity is the same issue than firearms... if only the State and its affiliate corporations have the monopoly over them, that's very bad news, for you and everybody else.

Of course Freedom Hosting is an instance of misuse of anonymity (like you can misuse a gun to kill innocent people... like the police does in full impunity these days), but that doesn't discredit all the other ethical and rational use of it, especially in a totalitarian fascist State where people are being wiretapped, surveiled and filmed. This is the purpose of efforts like the Tor project, even if perhaps failed... to protect us against Big Brother.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:39 PM
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I recently installed Tor just to try it out. While the idea seems good, there is also the question of if you use Tor are you attracting "attention" to activities.

If you run around town with your hoodie up and a bandanna around your face... do you not look suspicious? While you may not be doing anything wrong..sooner or later your going to draw scrutiny.

It was just last night I learned about origins of Tor. While I was a little shocked... it certainly made sense.

Tor - Wikki

-Snippet-

Originally sponsored by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (which had been instrumental in the early development of onion routing under the aegis of DARPA), Tor was financially supported by the Electronic Frontier Foundation from 2004 to 2005.

Tor software is now developed by the Tor Project, which has been a 501(c)(3) research-education nonprofit organization based in the United States of America since December 2006. It has a diverse base of financial support; the U.S. State Department, the Broadcasting Board of Governors, and the National Science Foundation are major contributors. As of 2012, 80% of the Tor Project's $2M annual budget comes from the United States government, with the Swedish government and other organizations providing the rest, including NGOs and thousands of individual sponsors.


Naval Research Laboratory? DARPA? US State Department?... I believe that is worth a moment of reflection on the merits and use of Tor.

As far as using Linux here is a little something I found out....If you go the NSA website and have a look around...try looking under Research > Security Enhanced Linux.

Here is a snip from the page of what you will find.


The results of several previous research projects in this area have yielded a strong, flexible mandatory access control architecture called Flask. A reference implementation of this architecture was first integrated into a security-enhanced Linux® prototype system in order to demonstrate the value of flexible mandatory access controls and how such controls could be added to an operating system.

The architecture has been subsequently mainstreamed into Linux and ported to several other systems, including the Solaris™ operating system, the FreeBSD® operating system, and the Darwin kernel, spawning a wide range of related work.


No wonder FREE BSD has horns!

As far as the rest of the Linux distros I am not sure. Would a Guru mind weighing on this subject.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by TheOd

Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 

Whoa.... This is a shock


Only to privacy/anonymity novitiates


TOR was considered safe.

Only to privacy/anonymity novitiates

TOR is a great anonymity tool, nothing better, still is, in the right hands with the right, educated user.
Know your nodes or is that No your Knodes?



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by miner49r
 


It means that they prefer Linux for their security, as does the DoD, DISA, NASA, DoE, and at least 56 others. They prefer it for the same reason many civilians do - the ability to view the source, make sure there are no backdoors, and customize security to suit ones needs.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 03:18 PM
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For anyone to think that anywhere on the web is truly anonymous is simply stupidity. It has been the better part of fifteen years that the web has been fully tracked. Everything leaves a trail, Piss of The Man badly enough and They will track you to your grave.



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