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Has anyone been at Six Flags over New England recently? Please Read!

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posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 01:32 PM
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Mods, if there is a better forum? Please feel free to move where it best serves to be seen.

Okay folks, I'm rarely one to open with a headline like that. However, this story is no laughing matter or joke to anyone. Rabies is one of those true nightmare diseases from which there is No cure, No hope and No help IF it isn't caught quickly and put down almost on the spot.

Given that a destination like that is surely drawing international crowds and so, local news up there wouldn't likely reach everyone who might be concerned about it? Passing this story on seems almost an obligation, once it's spotted.


The Massachusetts Department of Public Health is urging those, who may have come in contact with a skunk at Six Flags New England in Agawam, to seek medical attention. According to the DPH, a skunk bit a woman, while she was at the park July 31. That skunk was taken to a lab, and tested positive for rabies.
Source: RSOE Index

From the Centers for Disease Control:


Rabies is a preventable viral disease of mammals most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. The vast majority of rabies cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year occur in wild animals like raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes.p.



The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. The early symptoms of rabies in people are similar to that of many other illnesses, including fever, headache, and general weakness or discomfort.


.....and this is why it matters as much or more than any other disease that could be reported to be confirmed and possibly with additional exposure.


Once a person begins to exhibit signs of the disease, survival is rare. To date less than 10 documented cases of human survival from clinical rabies have been reported and only two have not had a history of pre- or postexposure prophylaxis.
Source

So take care out there and if anyone was at the park, remember, one Rabid animal CAN bite others and this can be spread. A little nip by a seemingly pissed off chipmunk or any other critter in the area of a confirmed rabies carrier COULD...also be deadly. Get checked if this notice may have any personal importance ...otherwise? Well, the best advice is always to give wild animals a wide berth. See but not touch!



edit on 4-8-2013 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 02:16 PM
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What are the chances of someone getting bitten by a skunk?
Mix this news, with the news about the big terrorist plot and we got ourselves a conspiracy.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by WonderBoi
What are the chances of someone getting bitten by a skunk?
Mix this news, with the news about the big terrorist plot and we got ourselves a conspiracy.


Some of us appreciate the heads up. More public service, less sarcasm.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by suz62

Originally posted by WonderBoi
What are the chances of someone getting bitten by a skunk?
Mix this news, with the news about the big terrorist plot and we got ourselves a conspiracy.


Some of us appreciate the heads up. More public service, less sarcasm.
That wasn't sarcasm. That was realism. Again, what are the chances of someone getting bit by a skunk? lol Come on. Let's be real. Can we get a picture, of this skunk? [That's sarcasm]

edit on 4-8-2013 by WonderBoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by WonderBoi
 


www.healthline.com...




The number of animal bites that occur in the United States each year is difficult to estimate because many of these injuries are treated successfully at home. Still, U.S. figures range from 1 million to 4.5 million animal bites each year.


Not as rare as you may think. This thread is trying to warn people, not draw sarcasm. If you don't want to help warn folks, fine, but no need to belittle the ones who are.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by WonderBoi
 


To give you a very serious answer? Probably pretty good actually. They are vicious little suckers and the idea that they just spray stink is a myth. I played with skunks a few nights near the local power transfer station when I was a kid before someone slapped some sense into me on this very thread's topic being a possible outcome. The thing was tho, it was a whole mess of them living in the foliage and trees around the station and not a single one ever turned butt toward me to spray. They all put their tail high, head down and facing me, jumped back and forth in feigned attacks. It's why I found it entertaining at first.



I must admit though, having grown older and at least more wary if not wiser? Those little suckers would HURT!



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


These are nocturnal animals too, so if they are out during the day, stay clear of them just in case.
Same goes for the fox, bats, raccoons, opossums

If it occurred at the park during the day, the lady probably thought, 'Look how cute' and tried to pet it.
Not sure how it happened, just theorizing.



edit on 4-8-2013 by snarky412 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


If you are interested, rabies is a virus. Yes getting bit by an infected animal will most likely lead to infection, but just touching one might be just as bad.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 10:40 PM
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Thanks for the heads up. This particular nasty is considered to have been eradicated in Western Europe so I will be keeping a wether eye on this one. It could possibly lead to their being some movement restriction being put in place which of course will be grist for the conspiracy mill.
edit on 4-8-2013 by hotel1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by WonderBoi

Originally posted by suz62

Originally posted by WonderBoi
What are the chances of someone getting bitten by a skunk?
Mix this news, with the news about the big terrorist plot and we got ourselves a conspiracy.


Some of us appreciate the heads up. More public service, less sarcasm.
That wasn't sarcasm. That was realism. Again, what are the chances of someone getting bit by a skunk? lol Come on. Let's be real. Can we get a picture, of this skunk? [That's sarcasm]

edit on 4-8-2013 by WonderBoi because: (no reason given)


I think the point is while someone else may have been bitten by this same skunk, if there was one skunk with rabies in this park there could also be other animals affected as well so if a person has been there who was bitten by anything whatsoever they should be seeking medical care.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 10:58 PM
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Originally posted by DAVID64
Still, U.S. figures range from 1 million to 4.5 million animal bites each year.

Not as rare as you may think.


But of those bites,

Dog bites make up 80 to 85 percent of all reported animal bites in the United States and Canada. Cats account for about 10 percent of reported bite


So only about 5% of bites are done by animals other than by cat or dog....

Do not try and touch wild animals and you will probably not get bitten
edit on 4-8-2013 by hellobruce because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by WonderBoi
 


Skunks attack pretty regular. Obviously they have their first natural defense, but you back one in a corner and they will eat you up.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by snarky412
 


Possums are marsupials and don't normally carry the rabies virus.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 11:40 PM
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This thread is awry with false assertions about wild animals, rabies, touching, and biting.. not to mention the far out of place sarcasm. This could be important. Thanks to the OP.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 11:53 PM
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Originally posted by NightFlight
reply to post by snarky412
 


Possums are marsupials and don't normally carry the rabies virus.


True, it is rare due to their low body temps and slow metabolism, but not impossible.
They are also highly resistant to snake bites as well.


In my younger days when I used to work for a vet, we took care of many orphaned baby opossums.
One day they got out of their cage and were hiding in our house so we had to wait for night to find them. LOL.
It was funny. And yes, they hiss but they freeze up.



edit on 4-8-2013 by snarky412 because: spelling....



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 12:58 AM
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People usually get rabies from the bite of a rabid animal. It is also possible, but quite rare, that people may get rabies if infectious material from a rabid animal, such as saliva, gets directly into their eyes, nose, mouth, or a wound.

Link

___________

My sister was treated for rabies a few yrs ago after being bitten in her home, by a bat.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:13 AM
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That smelly french one probably did it.
Pepe le Pew



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by RobinB022
 


The rabies issue gets scarier when you start to think of feral cats - and your housecat that may get outside every now and then - as anyone with cats knows that they love to play with wounded animals - and other cats.

I looked on a website that said that it may take up to a month for a cat to show symptoms of being infected with rabies - most housecats play with their humans with small scratches and little bites - even with your kids.

I thought that was pretty scary - a lot of people don't get their cat vaccinated for rabies - always their dogs - but not always their cats.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 03:01 AM
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Originally posted by unphased
This thread is awry with false assertions about wild animals, rabies, touching, and biting.. not to mention the far out of place sarcasm. This could be important. Thanks to the OP.


Thank you, and I'd encourage anyone with questions or looking for more information to load the source link in the OP for the C.D.C. That's pretty much the same information a medical doctor will pull up to the level it goes into it, anyway.

@ Thread

Certainly though, as another post said and in general terms here? If anyone at that park happened to get bit by anything but their spouse on a scary ride, I'd certainly call the family doctor or a walk-in clinic and ask for advice on making an appointment or coming in. Like the information said, it's almost always too late by the time symptoms show. C.D.C. info I take as authority, since they are the agency charged with recording and tracking all that.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 03:51 AM
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Thanks for the heads up...

Here's another for us Fly Fishermen/women...Bat's...yes Bat's trying to nip your dry fly off the surface...if one actually manages it, never bite your line to remove fly after the event....caught a few Bats in my time...always cut line using scissors. if you manage to get the Bat off your hook without actually touching Die Hairy little Rabies infested Fledermaus..



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