Homemade Charcoal Starter

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posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 05:11 PM
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I love to BBQ with briquettes and I recently borrowed a chimney style starter from a neighbor. Upon looking at it I realized I could probably make one from an old metal coffee can. So after cutting the bottom out I retained it to become the heat shield. I drilled holes around the bottom of the can to provide air where the paper would go. I also drilled holes up the side of the can to ensure air for combustion. I drilled smaller holes across from each other above those holes and ran wire through to keep the briquettes above the paper. I ran them crisscross and wove wire in and out around the center. I used long bolts, drilled through the can and secured with washer and nut to secure the handle to the heat shield and then through hollow ceramic electric fence insulators to the can. This provided additional heat shielding. It worked very well and was made from stuff laying around.





edit on 06/02/2011 by grayeagle because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 05:18 PM
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I just bought one lol woulda saved me a few quid this.
Great idea S&F



posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 06:01 AM
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Hi frds,
I m not any idea about this can anybody tell me...about this



posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 07:35 AM
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reply to post by wilsongrace1111
 

The can is used to start BBQ briquettes on fire. They are placed inside the can and crumpled paper is place under the bottom and ignited. The flames rise up through the can like a chimney and catch the briquettes on fire.



posted on Aug, 9 2013 @ 10:40 AM
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I've always just got the light the bag type, and never had a problem with them.

Is there really an issue getting charcoal started? I suppose if an older, opened bag maybe, but much better to simply get more small bags, so they stay sealed until use, then light right up...at least in my experience (before going to gas grills).

Gas is really the way to go though. Ready to grill in no time, easier cleanup, etc.



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 01:58 AM
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Seen a similar device being sold on TV a 'few' years back. Makes much sense and eliminates that fuel smell from the light-a-bag solutions. Seen a few people use similar devices to light charcoal brickettes.

But like the G man said, propane is the way to go. Clean, quick, controllable in a flick of a switch. Much cheaper too.

But your device is ingenious and usable.



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 

Are you friends with Hank Hill by chance?
The chimney can be used to ignite any wood, anywhere, anytime. It concentrates the heat and flames within the chimney for sure starts. I have always preferred the taste of wood to other fuels. I don't like the smell or faint taste of starting fluid. Propane may be faster but you still have to transport your tank to refill it. With propane there is always the chance of explosion. But each to his own.



posted on Aug, 15 2013 @ 09:21 AM
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reply to post by grayeagle
 


I'm on a ranch, so no stranger to storing explosive fuels. Propane for the grill and horse trailer, Diesel for the tractor, Regular gas for the lawn mower, and 40:1 mixes for chainsaws and weed whackers, etc. I used to be a hickory chips and charcoal guy too, but once going gas, never gone back. I still use a smoker box in there for the wood flavor, so not losing anything in taste.



posted on Aug, 15 2013 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 

I believe my humble little chimney starter will be useful in a SHTF scenario, when propane may become unavailable. You could actually place a cooking pot or pan on the top of it for a concentrated heat. Anyway the thread was meant as a possible solution for those who still use briquettes. Like me.



posted on Aug, 15 2013 @ 08:20 PM
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Perhaps sorta, kinda off-topic............. If you have access to coconut shells -- not the husk, but the shells -- they make an excellent charcoal; they burn evenly and impart a delightful essence to whatever you choose to grill.

The charcoal "tunnel" that you outlined.......... yeah, it's a great way to start your coals, because it causes them to mostly be at the same level of burning at the same time. Thus, your coals will be even and the heat will also be even across your grill.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:23 AM
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reply to post by argentus
 


Thanks for offering the idea of using coconut shell. Now, if I can just find a way to for me to be somewhere I can pick them up off a beach this winter!
Boy do I need a vacation from my retirement!
edit on 06/02/2011 by grayeagle because: (no reason given)





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