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UK - "Better yourself through education" Can you afford it? I cant.

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posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 04:17 AM
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Almost anything computer related, and powerpoint, excel, access, word, and so on are no exception can be self taught with nothing more than an internet connection and some well phrased searches in Google. I'm not in the UK so I don't know if that's enough for you rather than having the certificate, but if self improvement is the goal you can learn that way even without a class.




posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 04:37 AM
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I agree that life is tough and can often seem unfair however, if you needed counselling after finding working in a coffee shop stressful then you will struggle with a proper job. Teachers for example - my wife works 75hrs+ a week and has practically no money left once all the bills have gone out. She is responsible for making sure 30 5yr old kids progress to the national expectations whilst also dealing with parents, reports, assessments, social services etc. I work 45hrs a week (flexible hours give me time to occasionally post on here!). You will find that call centers, office admin etc are ALL more stressful than working in a coffee shop!

I have to say that I can't hold any sympathy to you complaining about the price of education. School was free, an opportunity to gain GCSEs, GNVQs, A-Levels etc. These qualifications would provide you more than ample opportunity to get a decent job. I haven't even got A-Levels but through hard work and determination have worked myself up to a very comfortable and healthy salary. If you miss this opportunity, then I'm afraid that you have to live with the consequences and put in the extra time and money to make up for it.

This seems like another classic example of a young Brit who expects everything for nothing. Hard graft and willpower, that's all you need.
edit on 6-8-2013 by fiftyfifty because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 05:12 AM
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Originally posted by fiftyfifty
I agree that life is tough and can often seem unfair however, if you needed counselling after finding working in a coffee shop stressful then you will struggle with a proper job. Teachers for example - my wife works 75hrs+ a week and has practically no money left once all the bills have gone out. She is responsible for making sure 30 5yr old kids progress to the national expectations whilst also dealing with parents, reports, assessments, social services etc. I work 45hrs a week (flexible hours give me time to occasionally post on here!). You will find that call centers, office admin etc are ALL more stressful than working in a coffee shop!


It was a bad time for me, wasn't JUST the coffeeshop driving me insane and im fine now, well balanced and moving forward.


I have to say that I can't hold any sympathy to you complaining about the price of education. School was free, an opportunity to gain GCSEs, GNVQs, A-Levels etc. These qualifications would provide you more than ample opportunity to get a decent job.


Really? Because i have GCSE's and 2 A-levels - Still struggling to get anywhere, perhaps because of the amount of graduates i am also competing with?


I haven't even got A-Levels but through hard work and determination have worked myself up to a very comfortable and healthy salary. If you miss this opportunity, then I'm afraid that you have to live with the consequences and put in the extra time and money to make up for it.


What line of work are you in if you dont mind me asking? Ive noticed that if you're good at sales, you're set for life as the service sector is all about maximising sales. I cant sell for #.


This seems like another classic example of a young Brit who expects everything for nothing. Hard graft and willpower, that's all you need.


I disagree. Ive tried to lay the foundations so i can get to where i want to go, as i said in my OP (Im not sure you bothered to read it) Im not expecting 20k a year, be promoted in my first week, Flash car, big house - I just want a secure...ish job in an administrative field, Surely that's not asking for the world when ive gone out of my way to do/find courses AND worked for a year VOLUNTARILY free of charge to get some of that all important experience?

I think perhaps you left school many years ago when there was more opportunity to start from nothing and end up comfortable through hard work and will power.



posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 05:24 AM
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I would find working in a coffee shop stressful and I certainly could not sit and talk into a telephone all day either.
Not all of us are cut out for any job.
I wonder if those that laugh at coffee shop stress ever worked in a coffee shop?

Anyway, it does suck not making enough money to better oneself, one feels stuck, and doomed.



posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 05:30 AM
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reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


I think I perhaps misunderstood you so apologise for jumping to conclusions.

I find it hard to believe that if you have GCSEs and A-LEvels and are struggling to the capacity that you are. Maybe you are being too specific? I don't know. You are right, I am in sales/ business development and agree that there are many jobs of this type around. Trust me, you don't have to be particularly talented, just a quick learner with the ability to speak to and get on with people although it's not everyones cup of tea. I would be doing something much more worthwhile if I could afford to! I left school / college in 2004 and worked as a catering assistant at a department store in the final couple of years so I know how dealing with the public and serving them can be a drag. Personal/ emotional issues can affect anyone at any tome so glad to hear that you are doing well now and I'm sure you will find future roles easier without that additional 'upset'.

You have a lot of voluntary experience which employers love as it shows willingness to work, my advice to you would be it is a numbers game, apply for as many jobs as you can find in an area you are interested in and believe you are right for the job at interview stage.. Forget further education for the time being and wait until you CAN afford it before considering it. In many cases, unless it is a vocational career, experience is much more valuable than education.

By the way. administritive jobs are probably so difficult to get into because that is one of the first things people think of. Try and think about what you enjoy rather than what you think you are capable. Most junior sales roles for example offer all the training you need. You might not be able to sell for # now but after an induction and some training you never know. You don't have to be a bolshy, cocky, stereoptypical salesperson infact I try to avoid this as much as possible. This will go for other roles too. Try putting the word 'trainee' into the jobsearch bar and see what comes up


I genuinely wish you luck!
edit on 6-8-2013 by fiftyfifty because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by fiftyfifty
reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


I think I perhaps misunderstood you so apologise for jumping to conclusions.

I find it hard to believe that if you have GCSEs and A-LEvels and are struggling to the capacity that you are. Maybe you are being too specific? I don't know. You are right, I am in sales/ business development and agree that there are many jobs of this type around. Trust me, you don't have to be particularly talented, just a quick learner with the ability to speak to and get on with people although it's not everyones cup of tea. I would be doing something much more worthwhile if I could afford to! I left school / college in 2004 and worked as a catering assistant at a department store in the final couple of years so I know how dealing with the public and serving them can be a drag. Personal/ emotional issues can affect anyone at any tome so glad to hear that you are doing well now and I'm sure you will find future roles easier without that additional 'upset'.

You have a lot of voluntary experience which employers love as it shows willingness to work, my advice to you would be it is a numbers game, apply for as many jobs as you can find in an area you are interested in and believe you are right for the job at interview stage.. Forget further education for the time being and wait until you CAN afford it before considering it. In many cases, unless it is a vocational career, experience is much more valuable than education.

By the way. administritive jobs are probably so difficult to get into because that is one of the first things people think of. Try and think about what you enjoy rather than what you think you are capable. Most junior sales roles for example offer all the training you need. You might not be able to sell for # now but after an induction and some training you never know. You don't have to be a bolshy, cocky, stereoptypical salesperson infact I try to avoid this as much as possible. This will go for other roles too. Try putting the word 'trainee' into the jobsearch bar and see what comes up


I genuinely wish you luck!
edit on 6-8-2013 by fiftyfifty because: (no reason given)


I thank you very much for your advice



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 02:20 AM
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What line of work are you in if you dont mind me asking? Ive noticed that if you're good at sales, you're set for life as the service sector is all about maximising sales. I cant sell for #.


Sure you can. You just persuaded yourself, and attempted to persuade others, that you do not have the ability to "sell". Selling is persuasion, if anything. Any 4 year old can teach you - Just take away their toys and watch them negotiate!!

Job hunting is a lot like selling, which could be the reason why you are having trouble locating a good job. As in sales, in job hunting you have to find good qualified prospects that are doing the hiring, you have to make professional contact, present your skill set to the employer, answer objections to their hiring you, and persuade the employer to make an offer of employment.

The lifeblood of business is sales, and nothing happens in business until a product or service is sold.

Your basic problem in finding a job could be the lack of selling or marketing skills. You need to do research on how to launch a marketing campaign to successfully market yourself.



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 05:02 AM
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Originally posted by SearchLightsInc

Originally posted by ObservingYou
Bleh Bleh Bleh... The world sucks - but life is what you make of it.

You have neglected to inform everybody that you should have completed your basic IT in school, I did, got 4 GNVQ's at grade A.

College is FREE from 16-19. If you MISS that window, Tuition is now free for those of 24+


Life IS what you make of it and if you didnt bother to read the OP, i am trying to change my lot in life by learning new skills. I have my 5 GCSE's including English Lit/Lang and Maths. 2 A-Levels in English Lit and Geography. Now i want to learn some actual skills so i can be more useful to society and im getting an "access denied"

I think i have a right to be upset mate.

And i am 24 but they're still expecting me to pay tuition i cant afford, so please link your source as to how i go about getting it paid for me, thanks.


You are able to claim tuition for University ANY TIME YOU PLEASE. Open University accepts NO qualifications, and leaves your fate in your hands.


Isnt offering a Level 2 business admin course. Ive already done an Openings module with them.


Not to mention APPRENTICESHIPS are in abundance to enable you to work and gain qualifications. If you use your head, you'd pick a trade - Engineering apprenticeships offer a decent wage of over £6 per hour, and always lead to long term employment.


Are you missing the point here? Im not an engineer, I wouldn't be suited to be an engineer! I want to go into administration because IM BETTER SUITED FOR IT. As for apprenticeships being in abundance i dont know what planet you're on but they're not.


Extremely stressful COFFEE job...are you for real?


Service sector can be very stressful especially when you have poor management running the show, take into account your life outside of work falling apart and yeah, it all get's on top and even the smallest things become stressful. I dont need to defend myself to you, if you dont understand that each job can have its toll on people that's not my problem, perhaps you should learn some compassion and stop judging people before you've even walked in their shoes.



See - lot's of options and it took me 4 minutes of trying...


Its a myth that if you work hard and be patient, good things will come.

Sounds like your not trying hard enough in my opinion.


I think MY generation has got it bad

We could have it better that's for sure, however, I AM your generation - and from my point of view, the majority of our generation lack the basic mental capacity to over come the above mentioned barriers, when in actual fact - if you apply you mind - you WILL achieve results.


Obviously you're entitled to your opinion and im slightly insulted by your rose-tinted view of the world. I posted this thread because i wanted some advice, yano, some help so that i can do better. Telling me to "work harder" isnt exactly contributing.


FYI - If you couldn't handle being a waitress, you certainly won't handle a call centre.


Hahaha, well, i guess i'll just go give up on life then because obviously, you're the people expert


Enlighten me, Where have i gone wrong?


Here - if you Google "College 24+" you find exactly what you need.

www.gov.uk...

Now, was that another example of somebody not trying hard enough?

Sorry for sounding harsh, however in my position at work (don't judge me by where I work, I also protest against the same companies in charge), I get to see just how many Job seekers are too damn lazy to go find a job...



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 06:17 AM
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Originally posted by SearchLightsIncOn April 2nd 2012 i quit working a minimum wage incredibly stressful job working in a coffee shop.

Seriously?

I think the fact that education costs money is the least of your problems by reading your story here.



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 06:52 AM
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Originally posted by moonrunner

Originally posted by SearchLightsIncOn April 2nd 2012 i quit working a minimum wage incredibly stressful job working in a coffee shop.

Seriously?

I think the fact that education costs money is the least of your problems by reading your story here.


I love how people are auto-judging me because i said working in a coffee shop was stressful, is it so hard to conceive that i wasn't over reacting?

I was working in a place where people often called in sick so we were under staffed pretty much 90% of the time, this made it difficult to keep up with everyday tasks, for one, running teh coffee shop (Which served food as well) Clearing tables, serving customers, making sure pots and such were going through the wash etc. That takes 4 people right there, now add in taking deliveries of stock (Having to go to the other side of the store to get those deliveries) and then put them away before they fell below a certain temperature (All while the shop was open and you were expected to do your other allocated job at the same time) On average, we would have 3-4 people the entire day, not enough to run the shop efficiently. At the end of the day cleaning took place and often when you came in in the morning they would say "This wasnt done right, that wasnt done right, you're getting a written warning blah blah blah" and the reason the jobs werent done right? Because people were rushed off their feet and staff only given and hour to scrub the place down, it was madness.

Doesnt seem like much until you're actually having to do all of these tasks every day always a man short, but now add on the actual working conditions - An incompetent line manager who often took days off sick, changed the rota through the week, never setting a rota so you knew what you were working the week after (Could never work your life around it) Bullying off staff (Over a period of 2 years i witnessed her bully and make 4 other members of her team cry) Openly trying to sack an older member of her team because she wasn't working fast enough, she was actually bragging about it to the rest of us and almost succeeded has it not been for me. They were breaking legal codes and everything - Serving tuna panini's as taster's even though they were out of date. There was a terrible atmosphere in that place by the time i had left, quite literally a job from hell. Basically spoken to like a piece of # by management, Made to feel worthless and that i would never do any better than that place. To this day im glad i told them to stuff it because no employer should be allowed to treat people that way.

So yeah, people can go ahead and judge me but they didnt have to live through the stress of working for muppets. At least now im moving into a job where its actually full time and taking the stress will be worthwhile because there's more job opportunity and i'll be able to afford things! And if someone calls in sick? No problem i dont have to carry someone else's job.

Judge away.



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 07:42 AM
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Ask the older generation and they will tell you that back in the day they could quit a job,walk down the road and walk into another job quite easily now everyones fighting for a job.

Im 24 and started work at 16 doing building labour work ( i have no qualifications) ,still in the same job and absolutely hate it however last year i decided to cut back on my spending and live a more minimalist lifestyle,i was spending all my wages on material possessions to make me happy and came to the realisation that i am working really hard to buy things that i dont even need,for example i love my car but i didnt really need it and it was costing so much money so i got rid and bought a 125cc motorbike which costs hardly anything to run.

By the time im 30 i should be in a position to semi retire and do part time work,then i will focus on enjoying life to the max.

The point im getting at is that you dont need a top education and a top job,fair play to anyone who went down that route and is making decent money but life is short and im not working till i drop just so i can afford the latest sports car and flash lifestyle,ive worked for billionaires who have everything that they desire and they are no more happier than i am and they still have to go to work every day.

I say forget the courses they are a money making sham,look around for a half decent job and be smart with your money.



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


Yes, you can improve your chances with education and whilst it's not free (nothing in life is) if you make the right choices it can be seen as an investment.

You are entitled to govt grants and funding when you are a full time student, to cover the costs of your tuition and your living expenses. Do you live at home with your parents? If yes, their income will be taken into account, but if you are living at home, that means you can reduce your living costs.

Whilst much of the financial support is in the form of loans, you have to be earning before you pay that back, and although that may seem like a bummer, it's just the way it is and has been for quite some time. Although I had a secretarial qualification that I gained in the late 80's, I went back to college after my daughter was born and my marriage had ended, firstly to do an Higher National Certificate and then I went on to Uni and completed and Hons Degree in Business and Information Management, both of which I needed loans to fund. Once I was working, I was able to do a range of other courses at my employers expense, and earned a lot of money that enabled me to have savings that allowed me to take time out and go an do a post grad (I've subsequently had a serious illness and have not been able to work, but as my health is improving, I'm still in a really good position to go and get a job as I will always have all of those qualifications as well as all of my work experience)

Therefore, I suggest that you look at a full time course starting in September and forget about the call centre stuff (they rarely keep people on after 3 months as the targets are impossible to meet, and if you thought the coffee shop environment was stressful, I can assure you that you would have a meltdown after 2 weeks in one of those places (I had a friend who ended up on anti-depressants after working in one of those places for 6 weeks)

My own daughter who is 19 is studying graphic design at college and is in her second year, and she will have approx £7000 of debt at the end of this year, yet she intends to go onto to Uni and do her degree, so god only knows what her debt will be at the end of her qualification, but she feels that it is worth it as she will be well qualified in a field that she is really interested in, and that will eventually bring her the financial rewards as well as great job satisfaction.

So don't give up, think about where you want to be in 5 yrs time...10 yrs time and so on and understand that having an education may be expensive in the first instance, but is definitely worth it in the long run.



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 02:07 PM
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sorry forgot to add the link to the Directgov website, (though I think someone might have added it earlier in the thread) giving you all of the info that you need, it even includes a finance calculator so that you can work out what you'll get student finance

So at least give it a look and just google your local college and see what courses they have and what you might be interested in, and they will give you all the info you need to apply (though do it as soon as possible because it becomes a mad rush once the exam results are out with all the school leavers applying for places, which is the 15th of this month I believe)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by SearchLightsInc

Its a myth that if you work hard and be patient, good things will come. Its not like im asking for a 20k wage, be promoted to manager within my first week, drive an audi, have a mansion - Im just trying to attain the skills to do better! I think MY generation has got it bad but im sitting here thinking that people being born today (in lower-income families) will have even less than me.

Any advice is welcomed, though i would quite like to discuss education becoming the most expensive elitist sector in the 21st century. Just really don't have a clue what to do.


Work hard and be patient?
A Myth?

No,
It's no myth but the wording is wrong.
You have to work hard and be TENACIOUS!

(Once again, I draw on experience at the risk of annoying younger readers.)

My degree was earned by working a dozen different jobs. Some times I was working 3 jobs at a time while going to night school 5-1030 pm , 5 nights a week for 15 months straight.
It SUCKED!
But, it was worth it.

Now days there are a hell of a lot of online and distance learning opportunities. You can take FREE college courses online for no credit and then use the experience to get college credits by taking equivalency exams. There are other avenues for education but you have to find them. Also, you can't dismiss inconvenient opportunities but have to find ways to make them work.

I didn't have the money for school, just enough to get my foot in the door. Every semester was a gamble because I actually paid for my tuition, books and supplies as I went along and often chose between tuition,books,rent and food.

I bought 5 gallon buckets of rice and beans from the feed store and lived off of that for a long time instead of buying at the grocery store. (Survivalists have no idea how tedious that diet can be.)

I partnered up with other students to buy textbooks and share them. We would sometimes share notes and schedule who would go to a class to get lecture notes so the others could work.
It took a lot of creativity and effort to scrape by but we did it. It was hard to watch other students who had an easy ride waste their opportunities and get lousy grades because they didn't appreciate what they had.


Even after I got a degree, it took several jobs and changes in career before I climbed to the point I could actually live decently and take care of my family. It took even more effort than school because I could go hungry but my wife and child could not.

The state of present day society somehow has convinced everybody that they were entitled to an education and good job. That's a big steaming load of bull. I was never told these things as a kid. I KNEW that I would have to do it on my own because my parents couldn't put me through school and nobody else would. I went into it knowing it would be hard and I would likely fail before I succeeded.

Sometimes I did fail to come up with enough money. I've slept on the floor of a friends dorm room for a semester and eaten a free meal once a day at a diner I worked for but I didn't care about that as long as I got the tuition paid. I also had to go back and re-take courses because I didn't get to attend enough classes even though my grades were among the highest in the class. I was on the deans list for three semesters while only attending about 60% of the lectures.

The point is, find a way to make something work for you.

Success is only guaranteed if you are born rich or aspire to be on welfare. Anything else is effectively up to the individual.

Whatever you do,don't feel sorry for yourself. It is the hallmark of the failed career. Or the career that never got started.

Everyone seems to think that things were somehow easier back when "things were cheaper" but it's not really true. We made much lower wages back then. It may have been a bit simpler, but not easier by a long shot. Life has always been difficult and stressful. People have always been short of money and there's always going to be a new problem to deal with.

The higher price of education is commensurate with the massive government subsidy of tuition. The only difference now is that MORE people have been given loans that they will never repay and degrees that have no use because they aren't in demand. They are all over the news and in the public eye screaming about the cost of education but they never looked past the first page on the application or did a tiny bit of budgeting.

EVERYTHING has a cost.
The cost of free or subsidized college from the government is more debt, interest and taxes at the expense of the economy.

Most people choose a degree 4-7 years before they ever look for a job or even look into the job prospects. They don't look at future trends and find themselves behind the curve in an inadequate or overly flooded job field.

Remember the girl on tv that owed 200K for a degree in Hispanic Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender studies?
She was complaining that she couldn't get a good enough job to pay off the degree.
No kidding?
Maybe she should have gotten a basic math course or two.

A technical associates degree can pay off better than a masters if you find the right field.

Keep at it and don't give up. There are ways to get educated and money to be made.

Once you get an education and a good job you will have new challenges to deal with and this won't seem like such a big deal.

Good luck.






edit on 11-8-2013 by badgerprints because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-8-2013 by badgerprints because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


Hi there.

I can kinda relate to your position.

School wise, I had 5 C's and 1 D at GCSE. Then college for Btec First diploma in public services (Which was a waste of time in my op)

I then completed an apprenticeship in construction. I quit the industry in 2008. A couple of months later the recession kicked up.

The advertised jobs in the local paper went from 8 full pages to half a page. Or one page if there was a large job add (mainly for call centre stuff which has a high turn over of staff)

I struggled and joined many job agencys. Signed on every two weeks for £90.

Occassionally had tempoary work (3 days here, a week there. longest streak was 2 months at a distributer)

During long spells the job centre would put me on courses. CV skills (must have written a cv a thousand times) and an Nvq Level 3 in IT (Advanced diploma in IT which was a micky mouse course but good as my formal IT skills were lacking)

Life kinda sucked because my friends were in work and I kinda resented that as they could afford a social life etc. But at the end of the day I got my self into this situation. I needed to sort my self out.

I ended up doing another apprenticeship at the age 25.

That was in bussiness administration (Nvq level 3) which took a year too do.

Now I'm sort of ok, I'm trying to "pre-empt" any future lack of qualification matters by hopefully doing some night school at college (Hopefully CISCO and an Nvq in welding) cost is about £700 in total.

There are options. None of them are easy. All require hard work and determination. Just wish I had this mind-set back when I was in school and actually listend.

eee.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 04:38 AM
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Originally posted by destination now
reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


Yes, you can improve your chances with education and whilst it's not free (nothing in life is) if you make the right choices it can be seen as an investment.

You are entitled to govt grants and funding when you are a full time student, to cover the costs of your tuition and your living expenses. Do you live at home with your parents? If yes, their income will be taken into account, but if you are living at home, that means you can reduce your living costs.

Whilst much of the financial support is in the form of loans, you have to be earning before you pay that back, and although that may seem like a bummer, it's just the way it is and has been for quite some time. Although I had a secretarial qualification that I gained in the late 80's, I went back to college after my daughter was born and my marriage had ended, firstly to do an Higher National Certificate and then I went on to Uni and completed and Hons Degree in Business and Information Management, both of which I needed loans to fund. Once I was working, I was able to do a range of other courses at my employers expense, and earned a lot of money that enabled me to have savings that allowed me to take time out and go an do a post grad (I've subsequently had a serious illness and have not been able to work, but as my health is improving, I'm still in a really good position to go and get a job as I will always have all of those qualifications as well as all of my work experience)

Therefore, I suggest that you look at a full time course starting in September and forget about the call centre stuff (they rarely keep people on after 3 months as the targets are impossible to meet, and if you thought the coffee shop environment was stressful, I can assure you that you would have a meltdown after 2 weeks in one of those places (I had a friend who ended up on anti-depressants after working in one of those places for 6 weeks)

My own daughter who is 19 is studying graphic design at college and is in her second year, and she will have approx £7000 of debt at the end of this year, yet she intends to go onto to Uni and do her degree, so god only knows what her debt will be at the end of her qualification, but she feels that it is worth it as she will be well qualified in a field that she is really interested in, and that will eventually bring her the financial rewards as well as great job satisfaction.

So don't give up, think about where you want to be in 5 yrs time...10 yrs time and so on and understand that having an education may be expensive in the first instance, but is definitely worth it in the long run.



I much appreciate your input on this matter! I have decided that i would take a chance on the call centre job - Its a reputable company and there are (as far as a i know) no sales involved. Started my training yesterday. Though i have not lost hope, i am planning to still chase up this course, perhaps next year when i may be in a better position to fit it in. In a perfect world, i'd be starting this course in september.

Being out of work 8 months, i was never really in a position to reject this job. Plus, i think it would look good on my CV.

But thank you very much for your advice



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 04:41 AM
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Originally posted by Esrom Escutcheon Esquire
reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


Hi there.

I can kinda relate to your position.

School wise, I had 5 C's and 1 D at GCSE. Then college for Btec First diploma in public services (Which was a waste of time in my op)

I then completed an apprenticeship in construction. I quit the industry in 2008. A couple of months later the recession kicked up.

The advertised jobs in the local paper went from 8 full pages to half a page. Or one page if there was a large job add (mainly for call centre stuff which has a high turn over of staff)

I struggled and joined many job agencys. Signed on every two weeks for £90.

Occassionally had tempoary work (3 days here, a week there. longest streak was 2 months at a distributer)

During long spells the job centre would put me on courses. CV skills (must have written a cv a thousand times) and an Nvq Level 3 in IT (Advanced diploma in IT which was a micky mouse course but good as my formal IT skills were lacking)

Life kinda sucked because my friends were in work and I kinda resented that as they could afford a social life etc. But at the end of the day I got my self into this situation. I needed to sort my self out.

I ended up doing another apprenticeship at the age 25.

That was in bussiness administration (Nvq level 3) which took a year too do.

Now I'm sort of ok, I'm trying to "pre-empt" any future lack of qualification matters by hopefully doing some night school at college (Hopefully CISCO and an Nvq in welding) cost is about £700 in total.

There are options. None of them are easy. All require hard work and determination. Just wish I had this mind-set back when I was in school and actually listend.

eee.


Funny you should mention the mindset thing, im starting to believe some people dont really get hat mindset till their early 20's! Onwards and Upwards, hope things are working out better for you now



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 04:15 PM
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Ha, guess I was a typical stereotype teenager. Rather go out than stay in doing revision for Exams etc.



eee.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


Good luck with the job and of course it is still valuable experience (and money) but remember it is never too late to go back and get an education and when you can combine both experience and qualifications, it will give you a definite advantage in the job market in the future.




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