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massive sinkhole develops in kansas

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posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by wasobservingquietly
 


This part of Wallace County has a lot of pasture land - it's still considered prairie, but it's mostly used for cattle grazing rather than crop growing. There is a lot of sandier soil along the Smoky Hill River, which tends to support yucca and sagebrush more than the native grasses you're probably familiar with.




posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by goou111
 


Wallace, Kansas is about 175 miles from Dodge City.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 06:25 PM
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To anyone asking about fracking (hydraulic fracturing) - I live in Northwest Kansas, about an hour from Wallace, and I am not aware of any horizontal drilling in Wallace County, nor any drilling at all in the area around this sinkhole (which should be in either Section 12-T12S-R39W or Section 7-T12S-R38W, if it's 8 miles north of the town of Wallace).

Two good resources for tracking oilfield activity in Kansas are the Kansas Geological Survey (www.kgs.ku.edu... activity history by legal description at www.kgs.ku.edu...) and the Kansas Corporation Commission (which keeps track of current intents to drill at www.kcc.state.ks.us...).

If you want to see a map of this area, and any historical oilfield activity in the vicinity, check maps.kgs.ku.edu... - Wallace County is the third county from the top on the far western edge of the state, the town of Wallace is in the eastern quarter of the county.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by RestlessEnergy
reply to post by goou111
 


Wallace, Kansas is about 175 miles from Dodge City.


I said near. I didn't say how near



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by goou111
 


Fair enough.
I only mentioned it because the subsurface geology is quite different in those two places. Coincidentally, there HAS been a recent surge of oil and gas development near Dodge City lately, so if any sinkholes open up down there there'd be a possible correlation.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 07:25 PM
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A cavern collapsed. Plain and simple.
Whether that cavern collapsing is due to an underground resevoir drying up, the oil companies doing their thing, or plain ole decay of cavern structural integrity (entropy) is entirely irrelevant.
It is a new hole. Stay away.

I gave three possible causes. One of them is nefarious.
Meaning you only have a 33% chance of even having a tail to chase.
Chase if you wish, but unless you bore into the Earth itself, you are merely speculating and very likely wrong in the first place.

Happy hunting.


edit on 3-8-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 07:49 PM
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Originally posted by AthlonSavage
The picture linked below is shows an impact crater from an asteroid. This is the explanation given my main stream science.

But is it really from an asteroid it could as easily be a gigantic sink hole.




Normally impact craters have a raised ridge from the spherical underground explosion. Also there should be cracks where the ground has been fragmented. That definitely looks more like a sinkhole.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by stormcell
 


That's funny. I see a raised edge all around.
Did you look closely?
Genuinely curious. Perceptions are funny it seems.

ETA: In my opinion that post and picture in this thread amounts to a colossal waste of time.
edit on 3-8-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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The feds were doing some underground excavating and had a cave in. Serves' em right.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by AthlonSavage
 


Its a Meteor crator several other smaller pieces hit all around the area!!



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by stormcell
 


It does have a raised edge around it I've seen it personally



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 





ETA: In my opinion that post and picture in this thread amounts to a colossal waste of time.


You know what they say about opinions they are like A....everyones got one. My opinion is your ETA was a colossal waste of time. Two colossal wastes of time so what.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by AthlonSavage
 


Aww
Are you upset that I used someone else's post to prove your's incorrect?
That is amusing.

As I said, the photo is clearly an impact crater. You can see the "raised ridge" at the rim clearly. They have meteor fragments at a museum. There are other craters nearby from the same event. Etc.

As I said, a waste of time. Quasi on topic, as you probably thought you had a legitimate point...but you do not.

Run along now.

ETA (cuz I know you love these): I COULD HAVE pointed you out specifically by saying "AthlonSavage's" post was a waste of time, but I did not.
Out of love, bro!

edit on 3-8-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by StumpDrummer
reply to post by stormcell
 


It does have a raised edge around it I've seen it personally

really? do you have any evident sir? i am so curious..
comon..show us that great thing..



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 09:07 AM
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I can't say I know why kind of soil makes up that area, but it sure doesn't look at if it's a water table or mineral that has dissolved. Some of these large sinkholes just don't add up. Some party's of the world, sure I get it. This one here is a bit baffling.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by hillbilly4rent
 

isn't that the Ogallala aquifer under Kansas? Opalaka is Fla.



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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Originally posted by VoidHawk
Wheres the surface material, ie: the grass?
uhh notice the first picture



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy

Originally posted by VoidHawk
Wheres the surface material, ie: the grass?
uhh notice the first picture

Yep! Thats just whats on the edge of the hole.

What about this from the OP



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 05:39 PM
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Originally posted by AthlonSavage
The picture linked below is shows an impact crater from an asteroid. This is the explanation given my main stream science.

But is it really from an asteroid it could as easily be a gigantic sink hole.




Except the fact there is other evidence to prove an impact.


After decades of controversy, the impact origin of the crater has been firmly established by the presence of preserved iron meteorites, the recognition of unique shock-metamorphic features in its rock



posted on Aug, 4 2013 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by NotAnAspie
 


I keep wondering . . . if the particle beam weapon that Linda Moulton Howe's readers, correspondents reported on . . . might have something to do with such.

Say if the leading countries . . . USA, RUSSIA, CHINA were all dinking around with such and firing 'demonstration' experiments at one anothers' territory . . .

Purportedly the weapon could fire through the center of the earth and do damage at a selected target on the surface on the other side from where it was fired.

IIRC, in one reported on experiment at a secret location in Somalia . . . the truck based weapon zapped a basket ball sized hole through 10-12 feet of solid concrete from 11 miles away fairly instantly.

www.earthfiles.com...

Might have nothing to do with such . . . but I don't have a better guesstimate.

I've been struck by how many of them seem to be VERY circular. . . . almost TOO circular.




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