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Is this the real truth about the 9/11 planes

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posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:16 AM
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Originally posted by Ivar_Karlsen

Originally posted by pinkbirdatabaseplease explain your flight skills -


Skills, well i've been flying transport category airplanes for 41 years.
And you are dead wrong.



This is just about how a sweptback jet would look like in clean config close to the ground.


400 knots or rather 130 ?
I'd say 130. At 400 it would be at 200 ft within 2 seconds at that angle.

Get real! You have no idea about flying or you are deliberately placing red hertings




posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by pinkbirdatabase
Get real! You have no idea about flying or you are deliberately placing red hertings

Actually by your posts you have no clue at all about aircraft

- still waiting to see the "laws of physics" you claim were broken!



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:23 AM
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reply to post by pinkbirdatabase
 


Try again. There were three passes, one of which was caught on video. The one on video was done at 116 knots, the one not caught on video, was done at 400 knots. The cue for the pilots to begin their climb and go around was the flight engineer calling "30 feet."


High Speed Fly Past (which is not shown here), was at the Barbers Pole of 375 KIAS
(due to the density altitude at Harare True Air Speed was approximately 400 Knots)

www.vintagewings.ca...



And just for good measure, a few more.


edit on 8/3/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:24 AM
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**ATTENTION**

Any Terms & Conditions infraction in the 9/11 forum may result in the termination of your account without warning.

This thread is under heavy staff scrutiny. The 911 forum has zero tolerance for any and all T&C infractions.

This includes personal attacks, character assinations or otherwise conduct unbecoming of a civil member of ATS.

Please post accordingly.

~Tenth
ATS Mod



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by pinkbirdatabase
 


Ivar, what kind of camera can take that clear of a picture of a plane flying at 400 knots?
The picture would have been blurry if seen at all.



edit on 3-8-2013 by SMOKINGGUN2012 because: clarification



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:32 AM
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reply to post by SMOKINGGUN2012
 


Any camera.

Here are just a few more high speed passes, all of which are perfectly clear.




This is a near mach pass and you can see the pilots.



I can almost read the nose art on this one.



F-14 passing through Mach 1 next to the carrier.




posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:50 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


The 2nd picture the photographer was obviously in another plane and traveling at a similar speed so less distortion.
The other photos do have some distortion as the photographer was stationary yet the photo of the yellow jet does not appear to be traveling that fast IMO.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:54 AM
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reply to post by SMOKINGGUN2012
 


Wrong again. That picture was taken off the deck of an aircraft carrier. It was during their "airshow" that they do as they approach home. The air wing does at least one high speed, low pass, including a mach pass.

If you're talking about the Blue Angels plane, do you think he's going to be disturbing the water that way if he's "not traveling that fast"? It takes speed creating a shockwave off the aircraft to do that. A lower speed pass won't do it.

As for the others, funny that they look clear enough that I can read words on them to me.
edit on 8/3/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Is this an aircraft carrier above the clouds?

www.strategypage.com...

The point is these planes flying at high speed look blurry as the yellow plane does not.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:01 AM
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i.imgur.com...

i.imgur.com...

Both planes were flying > 500 knots. Also, I took both photos from the ground. Both pictures were ISO 100.
edit on 3/8/13 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by SMOKINGGUN2012
 


The F-14 pass was made at low altitude next to the deck. Why is that so hard to understand? He made a high speed, low altitude pass. The clouds are behind and above the aircraft.

Here's a video showing three high speed passes, that are the same as the one made in the Blue Angels picture.




posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by C0bzz
i.imgur.com...

i.imgur.com...

Both planes were flying > 500 knots. Also, I took both photos from the ground. Both pictures were ISO 100.
edit on 3/8/13 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)


great photos, but isn't this comparing apples to oranges? I would expect a jet fighter to do this actually. Do you think that jet flew in that low, took out steel light poles that didn't rip up the wings or cause it to hit the ground and yet the lawn was completely undisturbed? That alone told me something very fishy was up.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by SMOKINGGUN2012
 


Any camera.

Here are just a few more high speed passes, all of which are perfectly clear.



F-14 passing through Mach 1 next to the carrier.


Same comment from me. These are fighter jets that I would expect can do some amazing stuff close to the ground. My father flew L1011, 747, C141's, and was awarded with multiple high level medals in his 20+ year service. There is no way that Passenger Jet did that maneuver especially by a very bad pilot! He couldn't even get clearance on a Cessna!




Hani Hanjour as a Cessna 172 pilot

However, when Baxter and fellow instructor Ben Conner took the slender, soft-spoken Hanjour on three test runs during the second week of August, they found he had trouble controlling and landing the single-engine Cessna 172. Even though Hanjour showed a federal pilot's license and a log book cataloging 600 hours of flying experience, chief flight instructor Marcel Bernard declined to rent him a plane without more lessons.

In the spring of 2000, Hanjour had asked to enroll in the CRM Airline Training Center in Scottsdale, Ariz., for advanced training, said the center's attorney, Gerald Chilton Jr. Hanjour had attended the school for three months in late 1996 and again in December 1997 but never finished coursework for a license to fly a single-engine aircraft, Chilton said. SOURCE


Ok, so he couldn't fly this:



But flew this like and ace pilot?






"For a guy to just jump into the cockpit and fly like an ace is impossible – there is not one chance in a thousand," said [ex-commercial pilot Russ] Wittenberg, recalling that when he made the jump from Boeing 727’s to the highly sophisticated computerized characteristics of the 737’s through 767’s it took him considerable time to feel comfortable flying. Lewis News





Former Vietnam Combat and Commercial Pilot Firm Believer 9/11 Was Inside Government Job

There was no fooling former Air Force and commercial pilot Russ Wittenberg the morning of 9/11. He knew it was an inside job from the get-go, knowing the ‘big boys’ were up to the same dirty tricks they played in the Kennedy assassination and Pearl Harbor.

The government may have fooled millions of Americans with its cockamamie official story, but the former fighter pilot who flew over 100 combat missions in Vietnam and who sat for 35 years in the cockpit for Pan Am and United, wasn’t one of them. MORE



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by UnifiedSerenity
 


Did you miss the 707, the 747SP, the Airbus, all doing high speed, very low passes? There is no reason a commercial plane can't fly in ground effect at high speed.

In fact the 707 that was pictured in an earlier post, did the pass down to 30 feet, at 400 knots.

The latest round of pictures was simply to prove that a camera can take clear pictures at 400 knots. The claim was made that the Air Zimbabwe 707 should have been blurry, if it was even seen, at 400 knots, in the picture.
edit on 8/3/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:41 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by UnifiedSerenity
 


Did you miss the 707, the 747SP, the Airbus, all doing high speed, very low passes? There is no reason a commercial plane can't fly in ground effect at high speed.

In fact the 707 that was pictured in an earlier post, did the pass down to 30 feet, at 400 knots.

The latest round of pictures was simply to prove that a camera can take clear pictures at 400 knots. The claim was made that the Air Zimbabwe 707 should have been blurry, if it was even seen, at 400 knots, in the picture.
edit on 8/3/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)


They didn't look like they were that fast or skimming the grounds to hit a door and not the second floor. Very low yes, but not Pentagon low. So, you think a guy who can't fly a Cessna can fly a Boeing 757? Now that is amazing faith!




posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by UnifiedSerenity
 


They didn't have to be that low. They simply had to show that it was possible. They were over 300+ knots, and they were in the area that planes supposedly can't fly because of ground effect. That proves that it was possible for a 757 to hit the Pentagon.

He could fly well enough that he passed a commercial pilots exam and was licensed. That exam isn't the easiest thing to pass, and requires a lot of hours.

As for the 757, there are flight sims out there, including believe it or not, Microsoft. That program is so accurate that a teenager in Japan was able to fly a Boeing 747 just fine. No, I don't believe he could fly a 757 that low from using Microsoft Flight Simulator, but he could learn the autopilot, and other systems on the plane from it, and be able to operate them in the real world. As well as renting real flight sims in other countries, that would be enough.
edit on 8/3/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:52 AM
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reply to post by UnifiedSerenity
 




So, you think a guy who can't fly a Cessna can fly a Boeing 757


So your just ignoring then the fact that Hani Hanjour had a commercial air license (Issued by the FAA in 1999) and had trained using flight simulators on a 737 and completed the initial training.

In other words, yes he knew how fly a commercial aircaft.

The only real problem he seemed to have was his poor grasp of English



edit on 3-8-2013 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:54 AM
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Originally posted by OtherSideOfTheCoin
reply to post by UnifiedSerenity
 


So your just ignoring then the fact that Hani Hanjour had a commercial air license (Issued by the FAA in 1999) and had trained using flight simulators on a 737 and completed the initial training.

In other words, yes he knew how fly a commercial aircaft.



For someone with a commercial license you would think they could fly a single engine Cessna. Apparently he could not. Would you let someone drive your 18 wheeler who can't parallel park at pick up truck? Would they be able to do ace maneuvers in your 18 wheeler if they can't get out of gear in a manual shift pick up truck? Let's use some common sense please.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58No, I don't believe he could fly a 757 that low from using Microsoft Flight Simulator, but he could learn the autopilot, and other systems on the plane from it, and be able to operate them in the real world.


Once had a flightsimmer fly a two hour leg in a level d 737 sim.
From engine start, takeoff, cruise to a perfect autoland at destination. No real life experience with airplanes at all.
Probably not a great pilot, but an autopilot artist for sure, so it clearly can be done.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by UnifiedSerenity
 


What are you talking about.

He could he was certified by the FAA as being competent to fly commercially

The only issue he really had was his poor grasp of English and a instructor at the Las Vegas flight simulator discouraged him form continuing his training however he did actually complete and pass the initial training.

Remember all he really had to do was a few maneuvers to line up plane so long as he could control it he would have been able to have done this.

He didn't even need to know how to take off or land all he had to do was know enough to fly in in the air and then line it up on a vector for the Pentagon. He was a certified commercial pilot who had been flying since 1996 and had training on aircraft simulators so i am sure this was with in his capabilities.



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