Gay Athletes Could Be Prosecuted at 2014 Winter Olympics, Russian Lawmaker Suggests

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posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 04:56 PM
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The IOC (International Olympic Committee) says they are only 'cautiously optimistic' that the olympics in Russia will be safe for gay athletes and fans. The IOC sent a letter to American olympians warning them about the anti-homosexual Russian laws. And the IOC says it's talking to Russian officials trying to convince them to let the Olympics take place without any discrimination against athletes, officials, fans or media.

I didn't realize Russia was so backwards. I thought they were more progressive than this. Russia invited the world to come to their country. You would think that they would dial back the anti-homosexual bigotry while the invited guests are in Russia for the Olympics. However, there is no indication that they will be doing that.

The way the IOC is talking ... they sound kind of nervous about it. IMHO

ABC News - Gay Athletes Could Be Prosecuted at 2014 Winter Olympics, Russian Lawmaker Suggests


In Russia it is now illegal to even speak about homosexuality around minors, much less openly display gay pride. Technically the ban is against "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations" around minors, but the implication for openly gay individuals is clear. Public displays of affection by gays, including holding hands or displaying symbols like a rainbow flag, are now banned. Violators face steep fines and jail time; foreigners face similar penalties plus deportation.

So what will happen to openly gay athletes and fans, as well as any vocal supporters or protestors, when Russia hosts the Winter Olympics next year in Sochi?

This week, comments by a lawmaker from St. Petersburg set off a firestorm online when he said that fans and athletes would not be immune from prosecution during the games.




posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 05:14 PM
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Russia had gay marriage just after the bolshevik revolution of 1917, even transgender marriage.

Now, its almost 100 years later so they are really going backwards.



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 05:14 PM
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There goes Men's Figure Skating and Women's Hockey.

In all seriousness, I don't think Russia could stand the international outrage of an Olympic athlete being arrested during the games on the charge of homosexuality.



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 05:22 PM
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Simple If this turns out true, boycott the games.
We are supposed to be going forward not backwards.



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 05:31 PM
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Originally posted by Carreau
I don't think Russia could stand the international outrage of an Olympic athlete being arrested during the games on the charge of homosexuality.

I don't think Russia would care if there was 'international outrage'. And if we stop to think about it .. how many countries would be 'outraged'?? The Muslim and Catholic countries would probably back Russia in it's prosecution. That doesn't leave too many others. And how much would Russia care about them if they got upset? I think not much.



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


It's one thing for Russia to arrest it's own citizens for a crime of homosexuality. It would be an entirely different situation to arrest a foreign athlete during the Olympics. Even countries with the majority Catholic would not support such an action. I wasn't referring to Islamic Theocracies in regards to the international outrage.

There would be far reaching effects on Russia if they were dumb enough to do that.



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 08:19 PM
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I am pretty sure foreign athletes are subject to all the laws and regulations of the country they are guests in. Even the stupid ones. I can see this ending badly if some activists decide to show up and cause a rucus........



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 08:50 PM
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Hmm at first they said they wouldn't, going out of their way to assure the IOC that athletes would be exempt from the laws... now this one guy is saying no one will be exempt. Boycott may be the way to go after all. Way to fail Russia



posted on Aug, 1 2013 @ 04:56 AM
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I understand that while you are in a country you have to follow it's laws.
But in the past Russia has said that this wouldn't be enforced during the olympics.
Now they are saying it will be.



posted on Aug, 1 2013 @ 07:50 AM
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Originally posted by Carreau
reply to post by FlyersFan
 


It's one thing for Russia to arrest it's own citizens for a crime of homosexuality. It would be an entirely different situation to arrest a foreign athlete during the Olympics. Even countries with the majority Catholic would not support such an action. I wasn't referring to Islamic Theocracies in regards to the international outrage.

There would be far reaching effects on Russia if they were dumb enough to do that.


So you believe that national laws should only apply to citizens of that nation?

Like it or not, all visitors to a country are required to follow the laws of that country. Russia would have to do the same. People cannot pick and choose what laws they follow.

The law is an unjust one, sending Russia back hundreds of years, making them a laughing stock of the world and paving the way for extremism. But it has to be applied to all, not some as and when it chooses.

The IOC cannot possibly give such a reassurance about the safety of participants and spectators. There is no way in hell the IOC is able to guarantee the safety of people against the law of host country.

What would happen if participants and spectators held a protest during the event, like all waving rainbow flags wherever they went? It's breaking the law of that nation. So would they be arrested or would the Russian authorities just pretend that it wasn't happening?

What if a same-sex couple participating in competition kissed during a broadcast in protest of the laws? Russian authorities would have no choice but to arrest them. It's a law, and the IOC cannot do anything about it.

These are likely scenarios, and there are plenty of organizations who will planning to attend JUST to protest these draconian laws. So how does the IOC expect to be able to protect people?

Three things could happen here... either Russia changes it's laws (not likely), the IOC chooses another nation to host the games (again not likely) or Russia has to deal with the fallout from protests and the inevitable arrests that will come from it.

How will the IOC then justify their position, with potentially hundreds of people being arrested and charged with being gay? How will other nations then deal with Russia after their nationals are arrested for being gay? How will Russia then repair the damage and embarrassment done to their nation?

I think the IOC will go ahead, I think Russia will suggest that people will be fine, when in fact hundreds will be arrested for protesting. I also think there will then be an international problem with governments then claiming shock and disappointment with Russia (too little too late) and Russia will then send all those arrested home.

The IOC will still have their money, Russia will still have held the games, and the gay people arrested will have more reason to campaign against Russia with more support from the global community.

Russia cannot win in this, and it's just going to cause them more and more embarrassment. The IOC will be exposed once again as a corrupt and morally repugnant organization willing to ignore Human Rights abuses for profit.



posted on Aug, 1 2013 @ 07:58 AM
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Originally posted by FlyersFan
I understand that while you are in a country you have to follow it's laws.
But in the past Russia has said that this wouldn't be enforced during the olympics.
Now they are saying it will be.


As I understand it, the IOC issued a statement that it has a verbal agreement from Russia that participants will not be affected by this law. They said nothing about spectators, and they gave nothing in writing to guarantee anything.

The IOC has basically just said that they "hope" that Russia will not enforce this law on participants of the games. They're desperate to find a resolution because of the threats of boycotts and the embarrassment they are receiving in the global media over this.

This man stating that the law affects everyone is a politician, and one who supported the new laws criminalizing gay people. He has (rightly) pointed out that national laws have to be respected by everyone, citizen or tourist, Olympian or spectator. He's right in that regard, Russia cannot arbitrarily state who is subject to national laws and who isn't.

The IOC basically just released a statement trying to stop the embarrassment and attacks against it, they have no evidence for the claim they make about the safety of participants or spectators, and Russia has not confirmed any of this nor made any guarantees.

It's going to be interesting to see how this pans out. Venues all over the world are boycotting Russian Vodka, there's a plan being formulated to pressure venues to boycott broadcasting of the games. There's pressure on to start boycotts against any sponsor of the games too.

If Visa and Coca Cola etc still want to sponsor the games, they are going to get a hell of a lot of bad publicity for it. I think it's likely that they will start to pull out of any plans to be involved.



posted on Aug, 1 2013 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


Good morning Flyer,

I don't necessarily see this to much of an issue. It would be far from Russia's interest to persecute/prosecute Olympic athletes for their sexual orientation in such a public venue. Why risk drawing international condemnation over what is a domestic decision by the Putin government.

I think this will only become an issue if athletes make it one. If they try to use the Olympics as a public platform to criticize Russian policy, then I can see this become something more serious.

The morality of the Russian policy aside, I think this should be a non-issue if Russia intends to be a good host and the Olympic athletes act appropriately with the customs of the hosting nations, regardless of their validity.



posted on Aug, 1 2013 @ 03:12 PM
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When the dust settles and the political posturing has subsided, the decision will be made that the athletes will not be prosecuted for what they do or say. The IOC will pressure Russia into submission on that issue. But lets be honest... that doesn't apply to the civilian protesters - whether they are Russian or not. The IOC does not care about them and will not lobby on their behalf. All they care about is their heist, popularly known as The Olympics, being conducted without boycott and international incident.

Sadly, even though many protesters will likely be arrested, and possibly beaten (or worse), I don't think the world as a whole is behind homosexual rights enough to generate enough outrage to change the outcome or prevent future similar incidents. We have made progress in winning homosexuals the rights they deserve, but I don't believe we are far enough along that this inevitable crackdown at the 2014 Olympic Games will have any negative repercussions for Russia.





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