Muslim Writes Book About Christianity=Fantastic Fox Video

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posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by boymonkey74
reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


His point was he is a scholar of theology, all religion..are you saying only Christians can write about christianity? and only Muslims about Islam?


lol so its ok because he has an education. Point i was trying to make is its in bad taste the muslims lose their freaken minds if you draw a picture of you know who. yet christian are supposed to remain complacent when a muslim theology professor does the same thing if not even worse lol I wonder if I spent 20 years on a study of the muslim prophet and just poked all sorts of holes in his story and religion how well do you think the muslim community would handle it? I could tell you that chances are I would need guards, I would receive death threats, A price would be put on my head and about 4 or 5 innocent people might lose their lives just for being christian's and.riots over the book would happen. My muslim wife would leave me my muslim mother might try and honor killing with the brother in law and it would be legal in the middle east to at lest put me in jail for the rest of my life. Yet Christians should just take what this dude says as truth because hes a scholar lol seriously

refute that I freaken dare you
edit on 29-7-2013 by digital01anarchy because: (no reason given)


better yet wait until they stop getting high on meth strapping a bomb to themselves and blowing themselves up like some kind of grotesque party poppers for a reasonable debate on religion
edit on 29-7-2013 by digital01anarchy because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


Uh he has....

No god but God (Updated Edition): The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam
In No god but God, internationally acclaimed scholar Reza Aslan explains Islam—the origins and evolution of the faith—in all its beauty and complexity. This updated edition addresses the events of the past decade, analyzing how they have influenced Islam’s position in modern culture. Aslan explores what the popular demonstrations pushing for democracy in the Middle East mean for the future of Islam in the region, how the Internet and social media have affected Islam’s evolution, and how the war on terror has altered the geopolitical balance of power in the Middle East. He also provides an update on the contemporary Muslim women’s movement, a discussion of the controversy over veiling in Europe, an in-depth history of Jihadism, and a look at how Muslims living in North America and Europe are changing the face of Islam. Timely and persuasive, No god but God is an elegantly written account that explains this magnificent yet misunderstood faith.

Beyond Fundamentalism: Confronting Religious Extremism in the Age of Globalization
is both an in-depth study of the ideology fueling al-Qa‘ida, the Taliban, and like-minded militants throughout the Muslim world and an exploration of religious violence in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. At a time when religion and politics increasingly share the same vocabulary and function in the same sphere, Aslan writes that we must strip the conflicts of our world of their religious connotations and address the earthly grievances that always lie at its root.

Anyways. Reza Aslan just finished doing a Ask Me Anything over at Reddit

Top Questions as of posting.

Q: Did you have any off-air conversation with Lauren Green after the interview? If so, what did she say? And has she reached out to you since the backlash against her interviewing tactics?

A: No. I don't know her. I don't know anything about her actually. I've never spoken to her before or since. Frankly, I feel kind of bad for her.

Q: Dr. Aslan,
Has studying religion influenced your faith? Do you find new things that change your view of the things you believe?

A: I think the Buddha said it right: If you want to draw water you do not dig six one foot wells. You dig one six foot well. Islam is my six foot well. I like the symbols and metaphors it uses to describe the relationship between God and humanity. But I recognize that the water I am drawing is the same water that every other well around me is drawing. And no matter the well, the water is just as sweet!

Q: Why did some cultures embrace monotheism, while others looked to polytheism?
Back in highschool, one of my history professors talked about how monotheistic religions came out of more nomadic peoples, where not much was had so they turned inwards (hence once god who judges intentions and actions). In contrast, polytheistic religions came from more settled regions that had access to everything they needed, so their gods reflected their surrounds (e.g. a god of thunder, or of the river, etc.) I never really followed up on this theory, but it's always fascinated me and I'd love to hear your thoughts on the matter.

A: Monotheism is actually a very recent phenomenon. In the hundred thousand year history of human religious experience, monotheism is perhaps three thousand years old. That's because the idea of a single god being responsible for both good and bad, light and dark, is something that the ancient mind had a very difficult time accepting. And no wonder! The only way that monotheism finally "stuck" is thru the concept of angels and demons. In other words, it was only when all the other "gods" were demoted into spiritual beings responsible for different aspects of the human condition that people were able to accept the idea one GOD in charge of all the lower spiritual beings.





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