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World changing Technology Enables Crops to Take Nitrogen from the Air

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posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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World changing Technology Enables Crops to Take Nitrogen from the Air


phys.org

A major new technology has been developed by The University of Nottingham, which enables all of the world's crops to take nitrogen from the air rather than expensive and environmentally damaging fertilisers.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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I can't stress how earth-changing this could end up being. This is absolutely amazing for anyone who understands how crops and plants of all kinds consume nitrogen. When growing nice healthy plants before flowering or fruiting, they require a ton of nitrogen, and then as they flower or fruit, they usually require a lot more phosphorus. This is usually the N-P-K ratio you'll find with gardening, the K being potassium for those who aren't familiar.

The article goes on to say:


Nitrogen fixation, the process by which nitrogen is converted to ammonia, is vital for plants to survive and grow. However, only a very small number of plants, most notably legumes (such as peas, beans and lentils) have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere with the help of nitrogen fixing bacteria. The vast majority of plants have to obtain nitrogen from the soil, and for most crops currently being grown across the world, this also means a reliance on synthetic nitrogen fertiliser.

Professor Edward Cocking, Director of The University of Nottingham's Centre for Crop Nitrogen Fixation, has developed a unique method of putting nitrogen-fixing bacteria into the cells of plant roots. His major breakthrough came when he found a specific strain of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in sugar-cane which he discovered could intracellularly colonise all major crop plants. This ground-breaking development potentially provides every cell in the plant with the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. The implications for agriculture are enormous as this new technology can provide much of the plant's nitrogen needs.

A leading world expert in nitrogen and plant science, Professor Cocking has long recognised that there is a critical need to reduce nitrogen pollution caused by nitrogen based fertilisers. Nitrate pollution is a major problem as is also the pollution of the atmosphere by ammonia and oxides of nitrogen.

In addition, nitrate pollution is a health hazard and also causes oxygen-depleted 'dead zones' in our waterways and oceans. A recent study estimates that that the annual cost of damage caused by nitrogen pollution across Europe is £60 billion—£280 billion a year.1

....

N-Fix is neither genetic modification nor bio-engineering. It is a naturally occurring nitrogen fixing bacteria which takes up and uses nitrogen from the air. Applied to the cells of plants (intra-cellular) via the seed, it provides every cell in the plant with the ability to fix nitrogen. Plant seeds are coated with these bacteria in order to create a symbiotic, mutually beneficial relationship and naturally produce nitrogen.

N-Fix is a natural nitrogen seed coating that provides a sustainable solution to fertiliser overuse and Nitrogen pollution. It is environmentally friendly and can be applied to all crops. Over the last 10 years, The University of Nottingham has conducted a series of extensive research programmes which have established proof of principal of the technology in the laboratory, growth rooms and glasshouses.

The University of Nottingham's Plant and Crop Sciences Division is internationally acclaimed as a centre for fundamental and applied research, underpinning its understanding of agriculture, food production and quality, and the natural environment. It also has one of the largest communities of plant scientists in the UK.

Dr Susan Huxtable, Director of Intellectual Property Commercialisation at The University of Nottingham, believes that the N-Fix technology has significant implications for agriculture, she said: "There is a substantial global market for the N-Fix technology, as it can be applied globally to all crops. N-Fix has the power to transform agriculture, while at the same time offering a significant cost benefit to the grower through the savings that they will make in the reduced costs of fertilisers. It is a great example of how University research can have a world-changing impact."

The N-Fix technology has been licensed by The University of Nottingham to Azotic Technologies Ltd to develop and commercialise N-Fix globally on its behalf for all crop species.

Peter Blezard, CEO of Azotic Technologies added: "Agriculture has to change and N-Fix can make a real and positive contribution to that change. It has enormous potential to help feed more people in many of the poorer parts of the world, while at the same time, dramatically reducing the amount of synthetic nitrogen produced in the world."

The proof of concept has already been demonstrated. The uptake and fixation of nitrogen in a range of crop species has been proven to work in the laboratory and Azotic is now working on field trials in order to produce robust efficacy data. This will be followed by seeking regulatory approval for N-Fix initially in the UK, Europe, USA, Canada and Brazil, with more countries to follow.
It is anticipated that the N-Fix technology will be commercially available within the next two to three years.


This will revolutionize the agriculture on this planet forever. It would be the same as curing everyone of a vitamin deficiency all at once and never having to take supplements filled with crap, fillers and chemicals.

phys.org
(visit the link for the full news article)

~Namaste
edit on 28-7-2013 by SonOfTheLawOfOne because: (no reason given)
edit on 28-7-2013 by SonOfTheLawOfOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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Wow. Raised in a family full of farmers this is absolutely mind blowing. It will change -everything-. I mean -everything- .



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:13 PM
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Screw the crops! I'll finally have a green lawn!!! Wooohoooo!



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by ValentineWiggin
Wow. Raised in a family full of farmers this is absolutely mind blowing. It will change -everything-. I mean -everything- .


I was floored when I read this! Half of the pain in growing healthy plants, besides the insects, is nitrogen. And if you can keep them healthy enough with the right amount of nitrogen and (often) calcium, you can prevent most insects with other biological controls, like parasitic wasps, etc.

This is the first thing I've been positively excited about in a long time.


My glass is half full today.


~Namaste



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:21 PM
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Here is the company which is commercializing the technology.

While the current rhizobia bacteria market is limited to a few legume crops, the accessible market for Azotic Technologies is on all of the world’s crop species.

Azotic has achieved a world first in grass growing in total absence of soil

www.azotictechnologies.com...



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by SonOfTheLawOfOne
 


My biggest concern is Monsanto is gonna steal this tech and convert them into something harmful



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:32 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
Here is the company which is commercializing the technology.

While the current rhizobia bacteria market is limited to a few legume crops, the accessible market for Azotic Technologies is on all of the world’s crop species.

Azotic has achieved a world first in grass growing in total absence of soil

www.azotictechnologies.com...


I have to wonder if the soil absence and growing is the same as hydroponic growing, it sounds similar.

Of course it has to be commercialized, that goes without saying, but it won't be long before people figure out how to make it free. If it's just bacteria, which is already an important part of soil cultivation when working in the rhizosphere, and a matter of figuring out which one, which they've told us is sugar cane, I would assume that it's not that far off. I wonder if simply planting seeds in soil that is also growing sugar cane, may cause the same or similar effect.

Having grown a lot of my own organic foods, I can say that real farming is not about growing great plants... it's growing great dirt / soil.
This changes the game in ways I am still trying to wrap my head around but will be amazing nonetheless.

Thanks for that link Phage.


~Namaste



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:34 PM
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Originally posted by starwarsisreal
reply to post by SonOfTheLawOfOne
 


My biggest concern is Monsanto is gonna steal this tech and convert them into something harmful


That's a great question, and a valid concern. I would definitely worry that someone will write a check "for any amount" to get their hands on this and shelve it. The lead professor seems pretty bent on helping the pollution we cause by using fertilizers.

~Namaste



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by SonOfTheLawOfOne
 


I have to wonder if the soil absence and growing is the same as hydroponic growing, it sounds similar.
Hydroponics requires nitrogen bearing compounds. Apparently this technology doesn't, or at least reduces the requirements a great deal.


I wonder if simply planting seeds in soil that is also growing sugar cane, may cause the same or similar effect.


Applied to the cells of plants (intra-cellular) via the seed, it provides every cell in the plant with the ability to fix nitrogen. Plant seeds are coated with these bacteria in order to create a symbiotic, mutually beneficial relationship and naturally produce nitrogen.

www.azotictechnologies.com...
It seems that it isn't just the roots that are involved.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:49 PM
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Perhaps this was mentioned and I just overlooked it (I mostly just skimmed the article) but I wonder if this bacteria has any effect on humans.

Also, if they used this to grow grass without soil, I find myself wondering if this stuff could one day have applications in terraforming.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:52 PM
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just have to keep monosanto out of it in every way possible



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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When an organism is infected with bacteria it is called a disease. It makes me wonder why nature has not done this naturally. Why does this bacteria not occur in other plants? Would it turn our fields and gardens into jungles? This should be studied and tested carefully for a long time before being introduced into the unsuspecting plant world. It would be great if there are no ill effects!
Remember the GMO debacle.

Maybe they could find a bacteria to increase CO2 absorption. But with the same cautions.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:03 PM
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reply to post by Magister
 


When an organism is infected with bacteria it is called a disease.

Then we are all diseased. We could not survive without the bacteria that reside within us, that "infect" us.


It makes me wonder why nature has not done this naturally.
It has. Plants have been doing it to a lesser degree for...ever.
www.britannica.com...



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by SonOfTheLawOfOne
 


Fantastic can't wait x]

Off topic: OHH MY GLOB! I luv your avatar!!



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:14 PM
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I don't know enough about atmospheric science to know if this is daft but is it possible that this process could get away from them. Decreasing atmospheric pressure to the point that we end up with a reverse greenhouse effect?



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by Josephus
 

Not if we eat the plants which are produced.
But there is a lot of nitrogen.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Magister
 


When an organism is infected with bacteria it is called a disease.

Then we are all diseased. We could not survive without the bacteria that reside within us, that "infect" us.


It makes me wonder why nature has not done this naturally.
It has. Plants have been doing it to a lesser degree for...ever.
www.britannica.com...



Gut flora can and does cause sickness when out of balance/control.

I was referring to all plants not already having this nitrogen bacteria. What keeps the bacteria confined to certain plants? Maybe there is a good reason for this.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by Magister
 


Gut flora can and does cause sickness when out of balance/control.
Maybe. But bacteria does not equal disease.


I was referring to all plants not already having this nitrogen bacteria. What keeps the bacteria confined to certain plants? Maybe there is a good reason for this.
Corn is a completely manmade plant. It cannot exist without cultivation. Maybe there's a good reason it never evolved on its own.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Magister
 


Gut flora can and does cause sickness when out of balance/control.
Maybe. But bacteria does not equal disease.


I was referring to all plants not already having this nitrogen bacteria. What keeps the bacteria confined to certain plants? Maybe there is a good reason for this.
Corn is a completely manmade plant. It cannot exist without cultivation. Maybe there's a good reason it never evolved on its own.



Nature foresaw Monsanto.









 
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