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The Ancients Knew More Than We Give Credit..

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posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by VeritasAequitas
reply to post by EA006
 


This is what I have wondered myself, what exactly is it a beacon for, and let alone for whom?

It is almost as if someone is designating the Planet Saturn, as a source of wisdom...

Another thing I've been looking into is that Saturn was also represented by a sickle, much like how you harvest crops with a sickle....

Back a few years ago, HiddenHand, mentioned the same word "Harvest" about the near future...

Does anybody have information on Saturn, the Harvester?
edit on 28-7-2013 by VeritasAequitas because: (no reason given)
I have always believed Saturn was special and held more significance than we are normally taught in school. Not because of the rings and all the other wonderful things about this 'planet' but the mysteries. And the ancients worshipped Saturn as a god. Am I correct? And as another member(circleofdust I think) said, it mysteriously radiates heat and could've been our original sun. There is alot we don't know about Saturn.




posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by WhiteNite
 


And the ancients worshipped Saturn as a god. Am I correct?

Not exactly. The "ancients" worshiped their gods and named the planets after them.



could've been our original sun.

No. It is far too small to have been a star.


edit on 7/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by Granite
Look for the hexagrams:
Indian Hexagram
And this Saturn astrology:

Saturn

If, in the second link, you are referring to the hexagram in the center of the Yantra for Saturn, you can stop expecting gasps.

The same shape is featured in the Yantras for Jupiter and Mercury.

Harte



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I think I've lost count of the number of assumptions you've made in just your two brief statements.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by CircleOfDust
 

Ah. I see.
And you make none, of course.

edit on 7/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:15 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by WhiteNite
 


And the ancients worshipped Saturn as a god. Am I correct?

Not exactly. The "ancients" worshiped their gods and named the planets after them.



could've been our original sun.

No. It is far too small to have been a star.


edit on 7/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)
. Oh ok.. You dont think they worshipped planets and that the planets were their gods? Interesting idea though.. Also do you believe there is anyway saturn could 'ignite' and become a small star.. And does it really radiate heat?
edit on 28-7-2013 by WhiteNite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by WhiteNite
 


Do you believe there is anyway it could 'ignite' and become a small star
No. It does not have enough mass to initiate or sustain nuclear fusion. The minimum mass for a star is about 75 times the mass of Jupiter.


And does it really radiate heat?

Yes it does. While it is not massive enough to fusion, it is massive enough for its gasses to be compressed and produce heat. As does Jupiter.
edit on 7/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:21 PM
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Originally posted by Astyanax
reply to post by VeritasAequitas
 


Well done; it looks like you hit some kind of jackpot.



In Qabala, six is the number of the sephira Tipereth, and therefore this hexagon represents the beauty and spiritual love manifested in the natural universe.

Good. We now have a basis for discussion. Could you please explain, next, how a hexagon-shaped storm on Saturn represents 'the beauty and spiritual love manifested in the natural universe'? Bearing in mind, of course, that Saturn was in no way a beautiful, spiritual or loving deity:


The potential cruelty of Saturn was enhanced by his identification with Cronus, known for devouring his own children. He was thus equated with the Carthaginian god Ba'al Hammon, to whom children were sacrificed. Later this identification gave rise to the African Saturn, a cult that enjoyed great popularity til the 4th century. It had a popular but also a mysteric character and required child sacrifices. Source

You tell me I'm shifting the goalposts. On the contrary, I am merely trying to ensure that they are firmly planted, and that they are still the same goalposts we started the game with. When you try to make a hexagon into a hexagram, it is you, not I, who are shifting goalposts. It's no use trying to muddy the issue by saying a hexagon contains a hexagram; if a storm on Saturn looks like a hexagon, it should be represented by a hexagon, not a hexagram.

My point – and I will repeat it here, for clarity – is that the kind of thinking that equates hexagons with hexagrams, or the ages of man in Greek mythology with the ages of the universe in Indian cosmology as you did in an earlier thread, is the kind of thinking can connect anything with anything – and usually does. It is fantasy and make-believe, useless for any meaningful, practical purpose.


Sadly for me, it took me this long to even understand what you two were bickering about.

If that brilliant mind of yours spent half the time you use questioning the ideas of others with actually pondering the "what if's" of said ideas, I bet we'd all be in a better place by now. Perhaps "mind firmly closed" isn't the way to go?
edit on 28-7-2013 by Rosinitiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:27 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by WhiteNite
 


Do you believe there is anyway it could 'ignite' and become a small star
No. It does not have enough mass to initiate or sustain nuclear fusion. The minimum mass for a star is about 75 times the mass of Jupiter.


And does it really radiate heat?

Yes it does. While it is not massive enough to fusion, it is massive enough for its gasses to be compressed and produce heat. As does Jupiter.
edit on 7/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)
i remember reading that 60 lbs of plutonium were dumped on both saturn and jupiter any info on that phage



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:28 PM
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Must be something in this thread the Skeptics don't like...Now they are all here to thread crash...

Hi boys!!



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by geobro
 

The Galileo probe contained about 50 pounds of plutonium (its power supply). It was crashed into Jupiter in order to preclude the possibility of it hitting and contaminating one of its Moons.

edit on 7/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by VeritasAequitas
 


Several presences caught my attention both for and against. So far, interesting thread thanks for sharing!

And completely dumbfounded to learn there is such a "unnatural" natural formation on the pole of Saturn. You know ,the six planet out....

More interesting is to read the skeptics arguments about what the ancients knew or didn't know and ignore the fact there is an almost equal sided hexagon on the pole of Saturn.

*shrug*.

You know I was always taught that arms folded across you is actually the same as "mind firmly shut" rofl. Coincidence? Perhaps, perhaps not.

edit on 28-7-2013 by Rosinitiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


cheers phage i knew i read that somewhere do you know the name of the one that hit saturn thanks geo



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by geobro
 

None.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:43 PM
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reply to post by Rosinitiate
 


look 19.47 degrees either above or below the equator of every planet in the solar system and you will come across a area of interest to science



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by geobro
 

I think that could be said of any latitude on another planet.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by geobro
 

None.



None yet.


saturn.jpl.nasa.gov...




What is to become of the spacecraft? Is it eventually going to degrade and smash into Saturn's atmosphere? This is currently undecided. We are waiting until we see what targets may turn out to be environmentally sensitive, and then make a decision regarding the final disposition of the spacecraft. Going into Saturn's atmosphere as Galileo did at Jupiter may be difficult to accomplish because of the need to fly through the rings for an orbit or two and yet maintain a functioning spacecraft capable of going the rest of the way down to the atmosphere. The orbit of the spacecraft won't degrade by itself. We would have to actively control it to a Saturn impact if that is the way the mission is finally ended.



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:51 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 

the bermuda triangle and the devils triangle on the opposite side on the earth / the great red spot on jupiter /cydonia on mars all at 19.47 degrees



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:53 PM
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I am not going to fall for this dangling-carrot post. What are we all stupid? Thank God that Ancient Aliens had the common rationality to impose reason on its passions! What if ancient tech got into the hands of real aliens, then we'd all be F'd!



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by geobro
 

Science isn't really interested in the Bermuda triangle or Cydonia (more than any other part of Mars).

But what about Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus. What have they got?


edit on 7/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



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