It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Are God and Satan actually good friends?

page: 5
4
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 09:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by NOTurTypical

Originally posted by theRhenn

Originally posted by NOTurTypical
reply to post by theRhenn
 


Because when he shows up in the garden as the shining one he is already evil.


Good point. But is it discovered at that point? Or was his falling when he was cursed by God after he tempted Eve?


No, his falling was when he uttered the famous 6 "I will"s. He fell because of pride. When he was lying to Eve in the garden he was already disgraced and fallen.


Now you have me interested. I've never heard of the "famous 6 I will's". Stop feeding me crumbs! Point me in the right direction! lol




posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 10:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by NOTurTypical
reply to post by iwilliam
 



The reality is that "god" and "lord" are English words, and as place-holders in the bible, are used to represent some of the many names for "god" that are used biblically, such as YHVH, ADONAI, ELOHIM, etc.


Great reply, however this portion is in accurate. God doesn't have numerous names throughout the Bible. He has only one proper Name and that is YHVH. All the other ones are titles, of those there are almost 100. But other than that, good response.


That's actually a title as well, as most names are in those days. Even names today can still be considered a title as they once, in most cases, had meanings.


Yahweh in modern translation integrated with another word has made the hybrid Jehovah.
It means I am the one, or I am what I am.
In the Old Testament, God was called YHWH, pronounced Yahweh by most scholars; the exact pronunciation of the name was lost because it was rarely enunciated. In its place was read Adonai ("Lord"). The written combination of the tetragrammaton YHWH with the vowels of Adonai was traditionally rendered as Jehovah in English Bibles. Although the meaning of YHWH is disputed, it is frequently translated as "He who is" and probably designates YHWH as creator. In ISLAM, ALLAH stands for a similar notion.



posted on Jul, 30 2013 @ 10:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by theRhenn

Originally posted by NOTurTypical
reply to post by iwilliam
 



The reality is that "god" and "lord" are English words, and as place-holders in the bible, are used to represent some of the many names for "god" that are used biblically, such as YHVH, ADONAI, ELOHIM, etc.


Great reply, however this portion is in accurate. God doesn't have numerous names throughout the Bible. He has only one proper Name and that is YHVH. All the other ones are titles, of those there are almost 100. But other than that, good response.


That's actually a title as well, as most names are in those days. Even names today can still be considered a title as they once, in most cases, had meanings.


Yahweh in modern translation integrated with another word has made the hybrid Jehovah.
It means I am the one, or I am what I am.
In the Old Testament, God was called YHWH, pronounced Yahweh by most scholars; the exact pronunciation of the name was lost because it was rarely enunciated. In its place was read Adonai ("Lord"). The written combination of the tetragrammaton YHWH with the vowels of Adonai was traditionally rendered as Jehovah in English Bibles. Although the meaning of YHWH is disputed, it is frequently translated as "He who is" and probably designates YHWH as creator. In ISLAM, ALLAH stands for a similar notion.


Except Allah is not our God. Allah is the shortened version of Al-Ilah which means "the god". It's a nameless appellation. The Christian and jewish God commanded his name to be proclaimed to the nations, except the jews neglect in that duty deeming his name "too sacred" they fall back on a tradition that was originally a curse from God on the Israelites who fled to Egypt when Nebuchadnesser II invaded Judea. God told them if they stayed in their land he would cause them to dwell there in safety, but if any fled to Egypt the sword they feared the most would find them. Many of those Israelites fled anyway and Nebuchadnessar II attacked Egypt and killed everyone of them.


If the muslim God is named "God" then their God is the semitic deity of Fortune called Gad, and the Lord didn't really care for people paying him any homage.

Isaiah 65:11

11 “But you are those who forsake the Lord,
Who forget My holy mountain,
Who prepare a table for Gad,
And who furnish a drink offering for Meni.

Gad was Fortune and Meni was Destiny. Meni was another name for the Babylonian goddess Inanna. Gad had another name....Molech, whom babies were burned to.



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 03:39 PM
link   


Text Satan does not hate god. God does not hate Satan. God hates sin but does not hate the sinner. God and Satan has a relationship of mutual respect. Satan was only trying to create a New Haven of Peace and Unity that was better than before.
reply to post by ShadellacZumbrum
 


ShadellacZumbrum

Reading your post has my curiosity. Which manuscripts are teaching this? Would like to read the source as I have never read anything like that. Don't quite know why God would create a hell or a lake of fire if He never uses them.



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 09:15 PM
link   


Text If Nephilim weren't the same species as humans, why does Genesis describe them as --men-- of renown? I tend to believe they weren't giants at all, maybe figuratively but not literally.
reply to post by 3NL1GHT3N3D1
 


I have asked that same question many times with no results except vague explanations. Here is some thing I read on the internet.


Of the size of the Anakim, a Midrash fragment—found by Schechter in a Pentateuch commentary of the thirteenth century, and published by him in "Semitic Studies in Memory of Alexander Kohut," p. 492—gives the following description:

—In Rabbinical and Hellenistic Literature:
According to rabbinical tradition (Gen. R. xxvi.), the Anakim are of the same Titanic race as the Rephaim, Nefilim, Gibborim, Zamzummim, and Emim. The name (as though containing the element 'anak = neck) is explained in the Midrash (Gen. R. xxvi.) as indicating that they wore "neck-chains heaped upon neck-chains," or, as if from the verb "to press," "force," that they seized the solar disk and cried, "Send us rain," or that "they squeezed their heads into the sun" (Soṭah, 34b; see Rashi on Yoma, 10a). Of the three sons of Anak who filled the spies with awe and fear by their gigantic stature, Ahiman, Sheshai, and Talmai (Num. xii. 22-33), the first is represented in Num. R. xvi. and Tan., Shelaḥ, 7, ed. Buber, 11, as challenging passers-by, saying: "Whose brother will fight with me?" (a play upon "Ahiman" = brother of whom); the second stood there stolid as a block of marble (a play upon shesh = marble), and the third made deep furrows (a play upon telamim = furrows) in the soil with every step. (Compare Soṭah, 34b; Yoma, 10a, which has a somewhat different and possibly corrupt version; see Buber, notes to Tan. l.c.) And when the spies saw these men towering up to the sky and looking as if piercing the sun, they were afraid and said: "We are not able to go up against these people, for they are stronger than He []; that is, stronger than even the Lord Himself!" (Num. xiii. 31).

"The daughter of Anak had gone into her father's garden and taken a pomegranate, which she ate, after having peeled off the skin and cast it aside. Then the twelve spies came and, seeing her father, were struck with fear and hid themselves under the pomegranate-skin, believing it to be a cave. The daughter of Anak in the meantime came back and, seeing the pomegranate-skin still lying there, was afraid lest her father might scold her for lack of neatness. She therefore took the pomegranate-skin, with the twelve spies hidden therein, and cast it out of the garden, noticing the weight added by the men no more than if the skin had been the shell of an egg." The legend bears a striking resemblance to the story of the giant's daughter reprinted in Grimm's "Kinder und Hausmärchen" (compare Chamisso's "Riesenfräulein").

You see how far fetched these stories can get. Here is a girl or woman who picked up a skin of a pomegranate with twelve Hebrew men in the skin and tossed it out of the garden. Not only were these Anak giants but the trees and fruit had to be gigantic as well. I guess we will never really know will we?




top topics
 
4
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join