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Blueprints Of NSA's Ridiculously Expensive Data Center In Utah Suggest It Holds Less Info Than Thou

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posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 06:47 PM
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NSA Utah Data Center Construction Plans
www.forbes.com...
Blueprints Of NSA's Ridiculously Expensive Data Center In Utah Suggest It Holds Less Info Than Thought

Data Center Emergency Action Plan Map: b-i.forbesimg.com...

Utah Data Center Blueprint
b-i.forbesimg.com...

Utah Data Center Blueprint 01
b-i.forbesimg.com...

Utah Data Center Blueprint 02
b-i.forbesimg.com...

---------------------------------------------------------------------

After reading this article I found myself wondering why would the government allow the blueprints for the NSA facility in Utah out on the internet. It includes evacuation routes and lots of details which might prove useful to parties that might want to damage or even attack the facility. This is a Forbes article not some leak from some hacker group mind you. Why would the NSA in the middle of all this spying scandal release the blueprints for public view on their new Utah data center? Does anyone think this is strange behavior for the No Such Agency?

What do you think ATS?

edit on 26-7-2013 by angrymartian because: fixed broken source link




posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 07:01 PM
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The Forbes link is not finding the article



posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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This is also over on Cryptome where I'd seen it earlier along with other stuff.... I think it's reasonable and it's required for public release. Not intended THIS way, I think. However, think of this. If they have a fire bust out ...wouldn't the fire dept like to know the basic layout of the place before they kick doors to get a surprise by what they find on the other side? I think that is all this is by the 'Unclassified' stamps on the originals. It leads me to believe there IS a classified set and likely a FAR more interesting one.

Also... This facility was said to be using over 1.5 Million gallons of water PER day.. EACH day. I see absolutely nothing on those blueprints to even channel and handle that volume in a constant in/out. Anyone else? There are volumes those aren't showing. There MUST be...because this doesn't show anything to explain the statistics of the place.



posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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Intelligence professionals know better than to let full-detail blueprints exist anywhere accessible by those who might exploit it. So maybe they are the real deal, but most probably not.


ETA: Whoops, Wrabbit covered it. What he said.



edit on 26-7-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by Granite
 


You get a splash screen first and a link to the article on the far right of your browser. One of those click to enter the site deals.

Looks like forbes moved it. I will see if i can find the new url.
edit on 26-7-2013 by angrymartian because: forbes moved the source



posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by angrymartian
 


Source URL should work now if not refresh your browser.



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 01:40 AM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
This is also over on Cryptome where I'd seen it earlier along with other stuff.... I think it's reasonable and it's required for public release. Not intended THIS way, I think. However, think of this. If they have a fire bust out ...wouldn't the fire dept like to know the basic layout of the place before they kick doors to get a surprise by what they find on the other side? I think that is all this is by the 'Unclassified' stamps on the originals. It leads me to believe there IS a classified set and likely a FAR more interesting one.

Also... This facility was said to be using over 1.5 Million gallons of water PER day.. EACH day. I see absolutely nothing on those blueprints to even channel and handle that volume in a constant in/out. Anyone else? There are volumes those aren't showing. There MUST be...because this doesn't show anything to explain the statistics of the place.


----

That quote of 1.5 million gallons per day gives a CLUE as to the TYPE of processing power
being used that NEEDS FAST heat removal....I suspect Silicon-on-Sapphire or Silicon-on-Diamond
CPU or GPU substrates that are probably IBM PowerPC base CPU architectures or are
NVIDIA Kepler or AMD Radeon GPU stream processor based systems that have been
PUSHED to between 10 Gigahertz all the way up to 100 Gigahertz clock speeds.

Since the heat by such CPU or GPU architectures would be enormous, 1.5 million gallons a day
would not be out of line for that type of computing system. Also, the high budget indicates to me they
are using SSD (Solid State Drives) as storage rather than multi-terabyte platter-based hard disks.

Their backup systems or offline storage will LIKELY be Exabyte tape drives for cost reasons.

This system is probably DIVIDED INTO FOUR separate processing systems
EACH in the 100 Petaflop range which makes them 4 to 5 times more powerful
any ANY other supercomputer on the planet. This means each computer is
likely tasked for specialized work such as imaging or machine vision and
optical character recognition, one for multi-language and multi-person
audio-to-text translation, one for video stream analysis and one for
intelligence activities scenario modeling which is like a weather
forecast for the intelligence community.

i.s. What's going to happen when, where and how?

There will also be workstation-based image analysis and display systems
which will show the bigger picture and allow intelligence experts to make
educated guesses as to what needs to be acted upon on a tactical basis
once the data from the MAJOR computing systems has been massaged
and narrowed down to actionable items.

Fuzzy-logic inference engines, neural net-based data mining,
specialty imaging expert systems and TRULY MASSIVE
Oracle and/or IBM DB2 database engines for advanced
SQL or 4th generation natural language searches
and data correlation will be the rule for this facility!



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by StargateSG7
 


Well, I took a couple Networking classes at the college to supplement my time using them but an expert I'm not. You sound like you have solid technical background though, so let me ask you something.

The 1.5 Million gallons isn't what got my attention. What really make me stop and go HUH?! was the fact they present this in every story I've seem as drawing *IN* that much water from the outside utilities PER day. Not that they have 1-2 million gallons circulating for the cooling, which I'd fully understand. Why would you be bringing in that much fresh every day though? Where is the old water going and why not cool it and recirculate?

I'm wondering if there is a legitimate good reason for it and perhaps, if so, you'd have heard or know of it by your apparent tech background?

Also.. You mention SSD's. Another question on that... I've got 3 SSD's myself, with 2 in the computer I'm on now. They are light speed compared to mag drives, with one *BIG* problem. When they die, unlike a magnetic drive, they just outright die. Gone. Little to no warning and nothing left to do but throw the stupid thing away and hope you had backups. I lost my first SSD awhile back and I was jumping mad. I shouldn't have been.....courses I took said that would happen ...I guess like so many, I just thought to myself that 'sure sure...they all fail someday...'. I hadn't appreciated someday DOES come with an SSD.

Has tech with high enough dollar signs solved SSD longevity issues? I'd have thought they'd use massive magnetic drives if not other more perm. means of storage? I suppose I'm just imagining the mighty NSA would be beyond using what we're using out here with it's habits of just "losing" everything in mechanical or other failures every so often?



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 11:28 AM
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Seems like a remarkable amount of money not to use it, anyone wonder why the attempt to stop the surveillance failed? Anyone talking about decommissioning these buildings? Anyone mentioning cutting back funding for completion? Anyone speaking about the construction in detail at all?

The Snowden affair was a rouse, a psyop, designed to take the sting out of this place going online. When it is finally up and running, no one will care at all, even the most ardent opponents will have accepted the facts.



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


---

The type of SSD's the government uses are NOT the NAND types which have write-wearing problems.
At the budget they're talking about I would not be surprised that it's all ultra high-speed STATIC RAM
which will last forever. The water requirements for daily use means that they're NOT using re-condensors
or metal fin-based radiator cooling ... they're just gonna dump the water after PARTIAL cooling which
will be a bit of an environmental problem. ...OR... they're using the water as part of a water-boiler
steam operation for power production. Based upon my guesses that part of Utah simply does
NOT have the power supply capacity to power the complex so I think a natural gas supply
and steam plant created power is what will be used for power production.



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by StargateSG7
 


Much appreciated on the reply. That gives me some new things to look at and learn about.


Amazing how much power they're talking about. I guess I hadn't thought in terms of Utah's literal power capacity vs. the needs of this one facility. Well... I wonder what all that computing power and storage could accomplish if it wasn't tasked to this?



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by angrymartian
 


Perhaps because the blueprints are full of disinformation?

Perhaps because it further deludes the people into thinking the government is giving a gnat's fart's worth of transparency as a faint milk sop to the sheeple, serfs and slaves?



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 


The cooling requirements are for example a lot of information to give out. If the cooling system was disrupted for instance how long would the facility still remain operational? Heat exchangers are most commonly made from aluminum. This is a weak metal and prone to chemical attack from corrosive vectors. It seems practical from a security standpoint to make certain that the cooling ponds not be effected by air attack. In the middle of the desert this can be deduced from the environment and the mathematics of the cooling pond volume and depth. This facility considering how much information it is dealing with is very vulnerable unless it is a decoy facility.



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