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First QF-16 ready to be shot down

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posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 07:32 AM
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The first QF-16 has taken a manned flight out of Jacksonville, FL and is on the schedule to be shot down. No word on when yet. It is tail number 85-1570, formerly of the New York Air National Guard. Word is that the F-15 pilots are "giddy" at the idea.

Even though the aircraft are built by Lockheed Martin, Boeing won the contract to convert them to the QF standard (and needless to say they're giddy too). One of the articles summed everything up pretty nicely.


Asked by a reporter (not me): “How cool is it to equip an F-16 to get shot down by an F-15?” the answer given by Tony Parasida, the president of Boeing’s Global Services & Support sector, sums it up perfectly.

“It’s something I’ve always wanted to do,” he said with an ear-to-ear grin and a chuckle.

Talk to anyone at Boeing and you’ll get a similar answer.

F-15 pilots throughout the Air Force are drooling at the prospect of being able to shoot down an F-16. Some have even joked it would be the crowning moment of their careers.

The big question now becomes, what happens when an F-16 pilot is tasked with shooting down a QF-16? Does he or she push the trigger?

blogs.defensenews.com...

Boeing believes that if they show they can modify the aircraft in this role, they can win potentially billions of dollars in sustainment contracts for F-16s around the world.




posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 07:54 AM
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So what you are saying is :

Now that all of these F-16s are becoming obsolete, owners can purchase a new conversion package that will allow them to be converted into target drones? As a way to "get rid of them"?



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 07:57 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Now that the F-4s have run out in the Boneyard, the Air Force needs a new target drone, capable of realistically portraying a manned fighter. So 210 F-16s (Block 15/25/30) have been picked, out of the ones there, and will be converted to the QF standard, for use through 2025.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:08 AM
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WTF? They can give them to Egypt and now they are going to start shooting them down? But yet an American civilian still cannot legally purchase and operate one within the U.S. airspace. But you can a Mig-29. I guess they figured buying surplus Mig-21s would be cheaper and Eagle drivers demand quality targets


Speaking of the old Falcons here is a cool link to a cockpit simulator that will give you a good look at the layout of an F-16(C, I believe) just click on which part of the cockpit you want to see a little closer. Falcon 4.0 would have been awesome with this


F-16 Cockpit Simulator


edit on 25-7-2013 by StratosFear because: forgot the link



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by StratosFear
 


The privately owned MiG-29 and Su-27s are owned by companies that provide air combat training to the US military. You won't see them zipping around in private hands for awhile yet. MiG-21s, and MiG-15s are a different story.

The QF-16s are the ones that are old and too expensive to update to anything approaching modern standards.
edit on 7/25/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:12 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I know this is how it has always worked but it still feels wasteful. I would rather us sell them on the cheap to other nations then wait till they get a little uppity then we can shoot them down. Oh wait we already do that.

Anyway I still find that it’s pretty damn stupid that the reason these planes are becoming obsolete is because we built more advanced planes and sold the others o nations we can’t trust. We essentially created the need to upgrade our tech.

Oh well it’s not like recognizing our flawed thinking will change anything.

I remember thinking how I could use a pay raise every range we had shooting 40K hellfire missiles for no real reason except to burn through the budget to keep our unit budget. The clothing allowance was ridiculous.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I was sure there is a guy who owns two Mig-29`s and a number of other military planes. He might operate a company that leases them out for what ever but he is a civilian. I`ll dig around and see if I can find his name and a link.

At least they could make the airframes and a limited number of critical parts available to private pilots so a de-militarized version can be made like the old F-86 Sabers and other ex-warbirds.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:23 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I am not an expert on target drones and I feel it may take an hour of digging to find the answers so I will ask you since I bet you know at least vaguely.

What types of ECM packages are utilized in "modern target drone simulations"? Do they employ state of the art tech from about 10-15 years ago in order to give an accurate representation of what to expect?



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by StratosFear
 



Don Kirlin likes fast machines and figured out that he could make money selling Czech L-39 and L-59 jet trainers to well-heeled individuals who fancied a flying sports car. In 1994, he founded Air USA in Quincy, Illinois, to that end and specializes in importing, certifying, and providing foreign military tactical jet aircraft for customers throughout the United States.

www.eaa.org...

The other company is Tac Air, they now own two Su-27s to go with their fleet.


MOSCOW, May 12 (RIA Novosti) - The United States has bought two Su-27 Flanker fighter jets to help train U.S. pilots to cope with the growing number of Russian 4th-generation aircraft sold around the globe, a U.S. online magazine said.
The two planes have been bought from a private Ukrainian company by the Reno-based Tac Air, which provides training and test support for the military.

en.rian.ru...



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:29 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


They're fairly limited as far as ECM goes. They pretty much keep the built in systems, and try to mimic whoever is the "bad guy" that day. They're looking more for the maneuverability aspect, and having a target that is pulling high G maneuvers as you're trying to get a missile shot on it.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:32 AM
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AAWWW Yeah!

Civilian owned F-16 and F/A-18A

Here is another article that mentions Don Kirlin which IIRC is the guy who I was referring to as well as a warbird foundation that owns another.

Civilian owned Mig-29

Although it does say its owned by a foundation its civilian.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:51 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


They're fairly limited as far as ECM goes. They pretty much keep the built in systems, and try to mimic whoever is the "bad guy" that day. They're looking more for the maneuverability aspect, and having a target that is pulling high G maneuvers as you're trying to get a missile shot on it.


So what it's like rookie training than, these drones?

And the real training is conducted in extensive mock battle exercises like Red Flag and all that?

I assume they use full ECM in those exercises to gauge it's true capability. At least in the more secretive exercises. Yes/no?



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:56 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


This is more for pilots to get a feel for a maneuvering target, as well as learn the parameters, and get the feel for a live missile launch. Red Flag is amazing training, and lets them use as close to a full up system as they can (which is still well under 100%), but they generally don't release any weapons, except maybe air to mud. The air to air guys don't get to play that often, so in comes Tyndall. They go out over the Gulf of Mexico and get to live fire missiles, and hear the bang, and feel the shudder as the missile comes off the rails.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 08:57 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Now that the F-4s have run out in the Boneyard,


That was my first model I put together as a kid.


F-4B fighter load out if I recall. Naval markings.
Jolly Rogers Squadron.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 09:02 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


The F-4 did wonders for the follow on generations. It was directly responsible for the ease of maintenance we see now in more modern fighters. It was a pig to work on, but it was a great fighter. She'd take a beating and do her damndest to get you home again.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 09:17 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Don't mean to get too far off the topic of the F-16 conversion kits, but just felt like sharing some wikis I was reading that I think are really interesting.

XP-67 Moonbat

FH-Phantom

First-Gen Jet Fighters

So I can relate it to the thread (if even remotely):
F-16 XL

Have any opinions on that XL?



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


I always liked the Cranked Arrow design, but from what I've heard, certain characteristics of the delta make it less than optimal. It apparently bleeds energy worse than the F-18, and at take off and landing it doesn't have the greatest lift characteristics.

Never liked the FH-Phantom, loved the Moonbat. It was one of those oddball designs that are really cool.
edit on 7/25/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 12:21 AM
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F-15 Strike Eagle=Glorified bomber...



posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by boomer135
 


That it is. It's still an Eagle, but without the dogfighting ability. There is one Strike Eagle that has 10,000 hours, and the only air to air kill ever scored by a Strike Eagle. They dropped a 2,000 lb laser guided bomb on an Mi-17 I think it was. Hit right on the rotor hub.



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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There is an interesting video released of the first test flight over the Gulf of Mexico, flown on September 19th. One of the reasons it's interesting is it's a dash mounted camera, pointing at the empty seat.

www.boeing.com...



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