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Obama can be legally executed for his illegal alien amnesty of 2012

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posted on Jul, 30 2013 @ 12:39 PM
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Originally posted by flyswatter

Would you like me to quote exactly where it says that the judicial power of the United States is vested in the Supreme Court?


Judicial power does NOT mean nullifying laws. THINK




posted on Jul, 30 2013 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by Make Speed Limit 45

Originally posted by flyswatter

Would you like me to quote exactly where it says that the judicial power of the United States is vested in the Supreme Court?


Judicial power does NOT mean nullifying laws. THINK


It very well can mean that, can you not comprehend this? Not saying it does in this case, but it can when the situation dictates. Does it have to be explained to you in monosyllabic words, or do I need to just copy and paste the whole Constitution and the duties/powers of the Supreme Court here? The part that isnt laid out word for word, but is pretty evident if you bother absorbing the slightest bit of information, is that the Supreme Court can do just about anything it damn well pleases, and there is no body other than the Supreme Court itself that can overturn their decision. As an example, Cogress would have to open a Constitutional Convention and amend the Constitution itself in order to get around a Supreme Court ruling on a Constitutional matter.

You keep moving the goalposts on this, and you get shot down every time. The President isnt going to be arrested, he cant be executed for what he has done, and the Supreme Court can do everything that you have said it cannot.

Next question? But please, I beg ... educate yourself on the matters above, just a little bit. I am by no means an authority on these things, but it doesnt take an authority to know them.
edit on 30-7-2013 by flyswatter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 11:41 AM
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Originally posted by flyswatter

Originally posted by Make Speed Limit 45

Judicial power does NOT mean nullifying laws. THINK


It very well can mean that, can you not comprehend this? Not saying it does in this case, but it can when the situation dictates. Does it have to be explained to you in monosyllabic words, or do I need to just copy and paste the whole Constitution and the duties/powers of the Supreme Court here? The part that isnt laid out word for word, but is pretty evident if you bother absorbing the slightest bit of information, is that the Supreme Court can do just about anything it damn well pleases, and there is no body other than the Supreme Court itself that can overturn their decision. As an example, Cogress would have to open a Constitutional Convention and amend the Constitution itself in order to get around a Supreme Court ruling on a Constitutional matter.


Where does the constitution say any of that?. Granted, the SC is very powerful but that's because they GAVE themselves the power. The constitution does not give it to them. If states chose to, they could simply ignore the SC when it nullifies a state law . The founding fathers believed the states are above the feds. That's why they wrote the tenth amendment.

And Congress cannot by itself amend the constitution.!!! What a huge error on your part. Congress proposes an amendment and then the STATES must approve it by a 3/4 vote. You don't know anything.


edit on 7/31/2013 by Make Speed Limit 45 because: (no reason given)

edit on 7/31/2013 by Make Speed Limit 45 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2013 @ 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by Make Speed Limit 45

Originally posted by flyswatter

Originally posted by Make Speed Limit 45

Judicial power does NOT mean nullifying laws. THINK


It very well can mean that, can you not comprehend this? Not saying it does in this case, but it can when the situation dictates. Does it have to be explained to you in monosyllabic words, or do I need to just copy and paste the whole Constitution and the duties/powers of the Supreme Court here? The part that isnt laid out word for word, but is pretty evident if you bother absorbing the slightest bit of information, is that the Supreme Court can do just about anything it damn well pleases, and there is no body other than the Supreme Court itself that can overturn their decision. As an example, Cogress would have to open a Constitutional Convention and amend the Constitution itself in order to get around a Supreme Court ruling on a Constitutional matter.


Where does the constitution say any of that?. Granted, the SC is very powerful but that's because they GAVE themselves the power. The constitution does not give it to them. If states chose to, they could simply ignore the SC when it nullifies a state law . The founding fathers believed the states are above the feds. That's why they wrote the tenth amendment.

And Congress cannot by itself amend the constitution.!!! What a huge error on your part. Congress proposes an amendment and then the STATES must approve it by a 3/4 vote. You don't know anything.


edit on 7/31/2013 by Make Speed Limit 45 because: (no reason given)

edit on 7/31/2013 by Make Speed Limit 45 because: (no reason given)


You ask where it says any of this in the Constitution ... have you even bothered to read the Constitution, or developed any sort of understanding of it? Here, let me just make it easy and directly quote Sections 1 and 2 of Article III:

"Section 1.
The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at stated times, receive for their services, a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.

Section 2.
The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority;--to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls;--to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction;--to controversies to which the United States shall be a party;--to controversies between two or more states;--between a state and citizens of another state;--between citizens of different states;--between citizens of the same state claiming lands under grants of different states, and between a state, or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or subjects.

In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and those in which a state shall be party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions, and under such regulations as the Congress shall make.

The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the state where the said crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any state, the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress may by law have directed."

Now ... if you are not able to see that the Supreme Court can (when the situation dictates) nullify a law by declaring it unconstitutional, then you need not be arguing any of these points. You would just need to take a remedial American Government class, and maybe a Reading Comprehension class.

And for Constitutional amendments .. I said they modify it by calling for a Constitutional Convention, not that they would do it on their own.

Congress can propose/submit an amendment with a 2/3 vote (of quorum, not entire body) of both the Senate and the House of Representatives. States can also do it on their own, if 2/3 of the states apply to Congress to hold a convention. In either case, after the amendment is actually proposed, it has to be approved by 3/4 of the states. The only thing that Congress can do to affect this process is to require the ratification be done by state legislatures or special state conventions. This is provided by Article Five of the Constitution.



posted on Aug, 1 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by flyswatter
[
"Section 1.
The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at stated times, receive for their services, a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.

Section 2.
The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority;--to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls;--to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction;--to controversies to which the United States shall be a party;--to controversies between two or more states;--between a state and citizens of another state;--between citizens of different states;--between citizens of the same state claiming lands under grants of different states, and between a state, or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or subjects.




Nothing in there about nullifying state laws. Nullifying laws is an extra-judicial process and the constitution never mentions it which means the FF gave the power to the states via the 10A. THINK



posted on Aug, 2 2013 @ 07:39 AM
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Originally posted by Make Speed Limit 45

Originally posted by flyswatter
[
"Section 1.
The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at stated times, receive for their services, a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.

Section 2.
The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority;--to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls;--to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction;--to controversies to which the United States shall be a party;--to controversies between two or more states;--between a state and citizens of another state;--between citizens of different states;--between citizens of the same state claiming lands under grants of different states, and between a state, or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or subjects.




Nothing in there about nullifying state laws. Nullifying laws is an extra-judicial process and the constitution never mentions it which means the FF gave the power to the states via the 10A. THINK


Nullifying a state law is absolutely NOT a solely extra-judicial process. Along with the other various ways that a law can be gotten rid of, that power is also given to the Supreme Court. Marbury v Madison. The Supreme Court has the power of judicial review, granting it the power to declare a law null and void and unenforceable if they deem it not in accordance with the Constitution.

en.wikipedia.org...

I gave the Wikipedia link because it uses simple language for you. However, if you would like to read more in depth about it, just check links in the Notes and References at the bottom.
edit on 2-8-2013 by flyswatter because: (no reason given)



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