The Earth is in space, and it's made of rocks too.

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posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by jeep3r
 


Wow that third one truly looks like a fossil skull as others have mentioned.
Like a rhino, or some sort of large two legged DIno Predator.




posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 09:04 PM
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Originally posted by Rodinus
This is in a cave situated in Hang Song Doon in Vietnam :

The pearls of Hang Song Doon





Phytokarst formation in the same cave



More info here :

www.bibliotecapleyades.net...
ngm.nationalgeographic.com...

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 24-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Crap spelling... as usual!!!
edit on 24-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Pictures not working
edit on 24-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Pictures re-added as dissapeared
edit on 24-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Something going wrong with pics


I quoted the whole post to show the images again.
So these types of formations can lead towards an hypothesis of microorganisms, if they were seen on another planet?



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
reply to post by eriktheawful
 

Thing is. Just from being crushed, all kind of interesting shapes can appear, based on where the rock decides to cleave under pressure.

I found this in a pile of fill dirt that had some shale chunks in it. Lo and behold, a 300 million year old "tree"..really more of a fern like plant.




Ooooooo! That's cool!

I'll have to dig around in my son's room tomorrow. He's got some mulisk indent fossils that he found.

I'll take some pics and post them.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 11:26 PM
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So these types of formations can lead towards an hypothesis of microorganisms, if they were seen on another planet?


Erm, well i guess so if the conditions were favourable enough with the elements neccessary to support life?

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


Sure, that's what I'm leaning towards. If a rover found an uncovered outcrop, that had similar patterns.
It would be worth further analysis. With the possibility that there were, at one time, microbes of some sort.
At our current pace of exploration, it could be quite a while before we reach an area where extremophiles may actually still exist.

I my neck of the woods we have outcrops called tufas, where some are formed in concert with Stromatolite type organisms. But now, they just look like rocks. I'll photograph one of mine, and post it. it looks like a brain.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 02:38 AM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
reply to post by Rodinus
 


Sure, that's what I'm leaning towards. If a rover found an uncovered outcrop, that had similar patterns.
It would be worth further analysis. With the possibility that there were, at one time, microbes of some sort.
At our current pace of exploration, it could be quite a while before we reach an area where extremophiles may actually still exist.

I my neck of the woods we have outcrops called tufas, where some are formed in concert with Stromatolite type organisms. But now, they just look like rocks. I'll photograph one of mine, and post it. it looks like a brain.



Please do Space... looking forward to seeing your pics


I will try and do the same thing over here in France as i am having Cody over here in 9 days time and one of the places i will be taking him to is an underground quarry where Tufa is very common (same stone that was used to build the Loire castles)

I actually have some sculptures in this stone that i created with fossils in them.

Will do my best.

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 02:42 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 



Oh you have the good tufa, travertine style...Ours is so porous...just good to look at.
Or are you referring to Tufa, that is sometimes also called Tuff, the Volcanic stuff?



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 02:47 AM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
reply to post by Rodinus
 



Oh you have the good tufa, travertine style...Ours is so porous...just good to look at.
Or are you referring to Tufa, that is sometimes also called Tuff, the Volcanic stuff?


Please correct me if i am wrong Space..*blushes*...

This is what i am talking about :

The Loire Valley formed the floor of a vast sea 90 million years ago. Over the millennia, sediment from the sea floor, comprising fossilized living organisms and sand particles, became compressed to form what is now known as Tuffeau stone.

en.wikipedia.org...

This castle was made out of it :



An underground quarry looks like this :



Hope this can provide a little more insight?

Probably been too long in France now?... Duhhhhhhhh

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 25-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Word added
edit on 25-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Pic added



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 03:03 AM
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Oh that's cool, it's a type of limestone. Sometimes mixed with sand particles. But it's great to build with, because it's light and strong. The Downfall would be acidic weathering. But it's more sedimentary, made of tiny marine skeletons and shells.

Here is a Tufa


Same tufa underside view

You can see the channel in the middle where mineralized water seeped through. These types were supposedly colonized by bacteria. So they form reeflike structures. SO something like this, could be a water, and or life indicator of the geology of another planet as well.
edit on 25-7-2013 by spacedoubt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 03:19 AM
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reply to post by spacedoubt
 


Definately not the same as what i had posted, but probably quite a few mineral similarities... but much MORE than agreed (personal point of view) that something like this, could be a water, and or life indicator of the geology of another planet as well if the correct atmospheric conditions were favourable... i do actually believe that even though there may not be little grey or green beings with antennae on their heads that somewhere in the universe there are other planets that would/could hold the type of life form as portrayed in the few examples of minerals in this thread.

Great pics by the way!


Going to look further into that during my holidays which start from tomorrow... YES!!!!

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 25-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Words added



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 03:25 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


You are correct sir.
Both are limestone
just created in different ways.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
reply to post by 1MrMarc
 


So that would probably denote a sandstone formation, that eroded away slower than the surrounding rock?
Which shows that these are deposited into water?


My apologies, I was eager to contribute and did not post the info you had asked for.
edit on 7/25/1313 by 1MrMarc because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by 1MrMarc
 


No need to apologize!
I liked the image and was speculating that this type of formation could be indicative of water. Not always, but considering the location, I think those are sedimentary deposits.



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 01:39 AM
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Looking around at the rocks on desert floors here in Nevada, often you don't really know what's hidden inside them.
Rhyolites are extrusive igneous rocks. Meaning they come OUT of the Volcano. There are intrusive igneous rocks too. They come up to the surface, but don't breach it, they tend to cool more slowly, allowing crystals to form. Granite would be an example.

Rhyolites are related to Obsidian, or volcanic glass. They cool quickly, not giving crystals a chance to form.
Mars has MANY volcanic areas. Some orbiters have located what might be deposits of Rhyolites.
Rhyolite


Sometimes, like a box of crackerjacks, there is a surprise inside.
Rhyolite again, surprise!


It's just another view of the same rock. But you can see interesting patterns formed by the way the lava flows across surfaces as it cools. and SOMETIMES, later in this rock's life, there will be alterations caused by water.
This can change the color, or the texture, by leaving other minerals behind.

Why bring it up?
There are very similar looking stones called agates. They will never form unless there is water present. HOT water. The chemical composition of Rhyolites and Agates, are similar...Mostly Silica.

So Spectral analysis might show that they are similar. But I think you need a man with a hammer up there. CRACK!

edit on 27-7-2013 by spacedoubt because: (no reason given)
edit on 27-7-2013 by spacedoubt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 01:57 AM
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Here is a picture from my home county of Cumbria, the Lake District....many wonderful and beautiful areas.

Many of the fells here were once volcanic, in fact, the Scafell region was once a super volcano.




The large one in the centre would have the pareidolia crowd going "oh wow, an ancient structure!"



posted on Jul, 27 2013 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


Obviously the supporting center column of a larger building structure. You can even see the debris pile surrounding the column...


I googled the region, and found lots of amazing pictures. Are there any Hot springs?



posted on Jul, 28 2013 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
reply to post by woogleuk
 


Obviously the supporting center column of a larger building structure. You can even see the debris pile surrounding the column...


I googled the region, and found lots of amazing pictures. Are there any Hot springs?


That pic brings back many teenage memories of walsking in Cumbria... *sighs*

Sadly no hot springs there.

Kindest respects

Rodinus





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