Incredibly large coronal hole in the sun

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posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 07:17 AM
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Blackholesun

That amazing I've never seen such a large coronal hole in the sun before. It covers about one third of the sun.
These holes seem to happen once and awhile, but I don't know if after these coronal holes these sizes CME's will be massive too?

It's nowadays that we can inspect the sun 24/7 a day and that's great but also sometimes can scare you if you don't really know what they mean?

Even the researchers don't always have the answer to this. But anyway its just to let you know that our sun is cooling down a bit ...

peace




posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 07:27 AM
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Let's hope it doesn't shoot out a solar wind storm directly at us!
Some say, some say not, but some believe large coronal ejections can affect earth's magnetic field to such an extend that they can trigger earthquakes.



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 07:31 AM
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reply to post by Elliot
 


Right, never knew that , lets indeed hope that will not be the case...



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 07:40 AM
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Agreed it is a liittle startling when the damn thing looks like it's going to go out.
In 2006 NASA initially expected a solar maximum in 2010 or 2011, and thought that it could be the strongest since 1958. However, more recent projections say the maximum should arrive in autumn of 2013.

I wonder if this is the culprit for the New Zealand quakes today?
edit on 21-7-2013 by Samuelis because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 08:09 AM
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Many religions , and prophecies speak of the sun going dark for three days, you know all the doom and gloom theories , I'm trying to look at it from a science standpoint, maybe it's kind of like a match light flickering in the wind where the flame can disappear for half a second then come back, maybe that is the case with this event.



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 08:28 AM
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I've never thought of it like that....as if it was 'going out'!
Cool! or maybe not so cool!!!!



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 08:28 AM
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That image was from the 18th , the sun looks back to normal now if you click on the link and look.



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 08:30 AM
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If the sun goes out then I think we are all in a bit of trouble.....!!!

Lets keep are fingers crossed or send a nuke up AKA film "Sunshine" - Danny Boyle.

Rgds

PDUK



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 08:34 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


Just an odd thought...

If you were to use the same coordinates of the moon and the blackened area and then look at the same area on earth, I would think that you could have a clue as to where to watch for the effects on earth from this change.

Not sure if I explained my thoughts on the matter, but if someone was good at math it would be easy enough. In other words, if you super impose that picture in the OP and placed earth on it, you would get the area on earth to look out for in the coming days.



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 09:24 AM
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Originally posted by antar
reply to post by 0bserver1
 


Just an odd thought...

If you were to use the same coordinates of the moon and the blackened area and then look at the same area on earth, I would think that you could have a clue as to where to watch for the effects on earth from this change.

Not sure if I explained my thoughts on the matter, but if someone was good at math it would be easy enough. In other words, if you super impose that picture in the OP and placed earth on it, you would get the area on earth to look out for in the coming days.


Interesting though indeed.

I would add to that by saying that there is an enormous amount of magnetism happening in that portion of the sun, and with the discovery of magnetic "portals" connecting between the sun and the Earth, I would find it hard to believe that there'd be no effect from the change in magnetism at the sun in an event like this. Nobody knows how that would impact stresses on the magnetic parts of the Earth, such as the core, where perhaps some type of movement from the tug a magnetic event like this on the sun could produce. For all we know, the stresses on the crust and surface are from the core being tugged on ever so slightly when there are large magnetic events on the sun. That could explain why different quakes happen at such enormous depths. It's more about magnetism than it is CME's or solar flares, because magnetic events are happening far more frequently. With the movement of both the sun, it's wobble, and ours, you could have fluctuations of movement at the core that push outward on the plates.

Star for you for stirring the pot.

~Namaste
edit on 21-7-2013 by SonOfTheLawOfOne because: (no reason given)
edit on 21-7-2013 by SonOfTheLawOfOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 10:18 AM
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Originally posted by ujustneverknow
That image was from the 18th , the sun looks back to normal now if you click on the link and look.
Here's the pic for today from spaceweather.com... various coronal holes:
www.spaceweather.com...



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by antar
 


I don't know sounds interesting , but I think that this coronal hole is just natural occurrence. But who knows there are signs not to ignore , you only have to filter the right ones out I think?



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by Elliot
Let's hope it doesn't shoot out a solar wind storm directly at us!
Some say, some say not, but some believe large coronal ejections can affect earth's magnetic field to such an extend that they can trigger earthquakes.
we just had a cme lately and look at the earthquakes that are happening
planetry alignment can also cause quakes



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by Samuelis
 


For what I know the sun burns on nuclear fusion hydrogen becomes helium. It's amazing how this process keeps itself going at all?

The only thing is why this region cooled this much as it did and what does it mean?



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 03:07 PM
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Interesting thread, but it seems there are a few misconceptions involved.

First, let's look at the scale on the earth to the sun.



The earth and the sun are no where close to the same size, which is something people tend to forget when talking about solar activity.

Here's another pic that shows all the planet's relative size.



And a bit about distances.



Secondly, what appears as a hole, a cooler region, is because the corona of the sun IS hotter than the surface of the sun. What you think is a hole is more accurately a glimpse at the surface of the sun, beneath the corona, basically a temporary lapse in the corona above that section of the sun. The sun is not really cooling down, when you see pictures as listed, merely expressing it's dynamic and constantly changing behaviour.




The Sun’s Core is at a temperature of approximately 13.6 million Kelvin (~25 million degrees Farenheit). The optical surface of the sun (the photosphere) is known to have a temperature of approximately 6,000 K ( 10340 degrees Farenheit, 5700°C). Above it lies the solar corona, rising to a temperature of 1,000,000–2,000,000 K. Herein lies the problem: how can the corona of the sun be millions of kelvin hotter than the lower surface of the sun (photosphere)? The second law of thermodynamics can be stated in the form attributed to Rudolf Clausius: “Heat generally cannot flow spontaneously from a material at lower temperature to a material at higher temperature.” In other words, heat would normally be unable to flow from the solar photosphere to the hotter corona, so we must conclude that something other than direct heat conduction must be responsible for the high temperatures in the corona.

Source.

The most interesting part is in the fact that the corona is hotter than the surface of the sun, and a question that physics can't explain yet.

Thirdly, solar activity is in no way related to earthquakes.

Earthquakes happen all the time, and happen because of plate tectonics, and the earth's molten core. Here's a nifty link to watch REALTIME seismic activity.

As you can see, earthquakes are based upon fault lines, tectonic plates rubbing against one another, and most of the solar influence is filtered by our own magnetosphere anyway.
edit on 7/21/13 by Druid42 because: Completed post.



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by Druid42
 


The heat is caused by the intense fluctuating magnetic filaments that twist and turn on the surface of the sun. They create immense friction at the atomic level and therefore immense heat.



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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Originally posted by 0bserver1
The only thing is why this region cooled this much as it did and what does it mean?
Interesting picture. Thanks for sharing. Are you sure it's really cooled?

I'm not sure what the correlation of the coronal holes with temperature is. As far as I know, we actually measure higher velocities of solar wind coming out of the coronal holes, compared to the rest of the sun. That's why I question the lower temperature assumption.

The sun has a lot of convection going on with electromagnetic influences, and the coronal hole is a region where the magnetic lines don't loop back to the sun so the solar wind can flow outward more freely. For whatever reason, the larger gaps in the corona like this are more common in the polar regions of the sun.



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by Druid42
 



The second law of thermodynamics can be stated in the form attributed to Rudolf Clausius: “Heat generally cannot flow spontaneously from a material at lower temperature to a material at higher temperature.”

In other words, heat would normally be unable to flow from the solar photosphere to the hotter corona, so we must conclude that something other than direct heat conduction must be responsible for the high temperatures in the corona.


That, or the second law of thermodynamics is complete bull#....



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 08:38 PM
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Eric has been measuring sun's activity and he says that the sun is re-configuring itself and that this reconfiguration will lead to colder climates on earth.

He also speaks of sun's corona being cold and that the sun is a converter of energy from other domains / realms .



posted on Jul, 21 2013 @ 09:04 PM
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Originally posted by VeritasAequitas
reply to post by Druid42
 



The second law of thermodynamics can be stated in the form attributed to Rudolf Clausius: “Heat generally cannot flow spontaneously from a material at lower temperature to a material at higher temperature.”

In other words, heat would normally be unable to flow from the solar photosphere to the hotter corona, so we must conclude that something other than direct heat conduction must be responsible for the high temperatures in the corona.


That, or the second law of thermodynamics is complete bull#....




Maybe it is complete bull# ?

Do magnetics and heat conduction somehow feed/starve each other ?

This might explain why the corona is so much hotter than the surface of the sun...
And it might actually explain how plate tectonics works on our planet as well...

More heat, more magnetic activity, more movement.
Less heat, less magnetic activity, less movement.

Or vice versa... more magnetics, more heat, etc.



Pardon my thinking crazy thoughts out loud.

edit on 21-7-2013 by CranialSponge because: (no reason given)





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