Question about detonating a big nuke inside a close vacuum

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posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:31 AM
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Been on my mind for some time...

Here is the deal
Imagine a sphere made off the hardest material in the universe
The size of the sphere is humongous, the size of Jupiter

The sphere is built around a big nuke, the biggest nuke detonated on earth was 50 Mt so let´s say its a 50 Mt
there is no air around the nuke, no space at all.. the sphere is melted around the nuke

Now my question.. what would happen to the energy released by this nuke, when detonated in the centre of this massive sphere..

I always heard that energy would find a way out, but that apply to this theory ?

I will like to add.. I am not planning to destroy any planets anytime......soon

edit on 20-7-2013 by Spacespider because: (no reason given)
edit on 20-7-2013 by Spacespider because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:37 AM
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Hhhm interesting, just a couple of points to point out.
The biggest nuke ever was the Tsar Bomb 50/58 megatons.



And wouldn't the mass of the sphere be to great to exist and form a new sun?
If it was smaller I think it would still just be blown to bits.



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:42 AM
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reply to post by boymonkey74
 


Just found this footage of nukes exploding in space Wow





posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:44 AM
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Originally posted by boymonkey74
Hhhm interesting, just a couple of points to point out.
The biggest nuke ever was the Tsar Bomb 50/58 megatons.


thx
corrected



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:47 AM
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reply to post by Spacespider
 

Just to clarify

When you use the 'the hardest' material are you using in the true sense of hardness as in diamonds or as a metaphor for tensile strength?.



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:48 AM
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reply to post by boymonkey74
 


yes, I could imagine a sphere the size and mass would indeed collapsed on itself..
but I did not specify the material.. perhaps its a unknown material, that is very light weight but indestructible..
I was more focused on what would in theory happen to the energy released by the nuke



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:49 AM
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The nuclear bomb will impact the arbitrarily defined sphere in a likewise arbitrary way. What happens to the energy from that point is defined by the previous arbitrary event.



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:49 AM
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Originally posted by hotel1
reply to post by Spacespider
 

Just to clarify

When you use the 'the hardest' material are you using in the true sense of hardness as in diamonds or as a metaphor for tensile strength?.



a metaphor for a fictional indestructible material light weight..
the question is focused on the explosion..
Would it even detonate ?



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:50 AM
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reply to post by Spacespider
 


I don't think anything is indestructible, I think the energy would find a way out.
We need phage to come and tell us this one I think



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:51 AM
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Originally posted by Spacespider
Now my question.. what would happen to the energy released by this nuke, when detonated in the centre of this massive sphere..

I always heard that energy would find a way out, but that apply to this theory ?


This is nice and easy - most of the energy would be dissipated as heat and the sphere would warm up. It is reasonably simple to calculate if you know the properties of the material. The energy would then be radiated out into space.

Something the size of Jupiter wouldn't warm up much!

edit on 20/7/2013 by EasyPleaseMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:51 AM
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reply to post by Spacespider
 


So a concentrated explosion in the same space the the "bomb" occupy in the centre of the sphere ?



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:52 AM
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Originally posted by Spacespider
reply to post by boymonkey74
 

but I did not specify the material.. perhaps its a unknown material, that is very light weight but indestructible..

Then the sphere would remain intact.


I was more focused on what would in theory happen to the energy released by the nuke

Well, I guess it's up to you to decide if this fantastic material also manages to keep all radiation inside or not.
If yes, then you answered your own theoretical question. If no, then you answered your own theoretical question.



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:54 AM
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Originally posted by EasyPleaseMe

Originally posted by Spacespider
Now my question.. what would happen to the energy released by this nuke, when detonated in the centre of this massive sphere..

I always heard that energy would find a way out, but that apply to this theory ?


This is nice and easy - most of the energy would be dissipated as heat and the sphere would warm up. It is reasonably simple to calculate if you know the properties of the material.

Something the size of Jupiter wouldn't warm up much!


Would the "heating" of the sphere be enough for a bomb at that magnitude to re leave itself ?
That would be some very aggressive heating, almost instant ?
Or would the bomb create a very very hotshot in the centre that would remain that way until it have re leaved all the heat



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:57 AM
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Originally posted by boymonkey74
reply to post by Spacespider
 


I don't think anything is indestructible, I think the energy would find a way out.
We need phage to come and tell us this one I think


I was wondering that to...
But let´s say... a sphere the size of the milky way made of dense material.. and you place a stick of dynamite in the centre.. what then



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:58 AM
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This all make me think..

what if this was how our universe was created..
a GIANT !!!! sphere of mass, with some kind of explosion in the centre, and spread the material around
hmmff.. my head need to rest now



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by Spacespider
 


I see, I could give you some help on the effects of the blast on materials of varying hardness and strengths, but as that is not what your question is about I will step aside for those better informed.
edit on 20-7-2013 by hotel1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 07:01 AM
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Originally posted by Spacespider
Would the "heating" of the sphere be enough for a bomb at that magnitude to re leave itself ?
That would be some very aggressive heating, almost instant ?
Or would the bomb create a very very hotshot in the centre that would remain that way until it have re leaved all the heat


Basically the heat would spread out from the centre until the sphere was at a constant temperature, ignoring losses to space.

Imagine placing a red hot poker into a bucket of water. The water around the poker would be super heated but after a short time the whole bucket of water would settle to the same even temperature.



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by Spacespider
 


The thing would reach critical mass and make a blooming big sun. Not because of the dynamite because of its mass.
Exploding suns make every element in the universe..I think anyhow.



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 07:03 AM
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Originally posted by hotel1
reply to post by Spacespider
 


I see, I could give you some help on the effects of the blast on materials of varying hardness and strengths, but as that is not what your question is about I will step aside for those better informed.
edit on 20-7-2013 by hotel1 because: (no reason given)


Okay then..
Let´s say its made out of wurtzite boron nitride



posted on Jul, 20 2013 @ 07:12 AM
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reply to post by Spacespider
 



1 was thinking a fusion process may occur if the Jovian size craft was able to design a larger scale process somewhat like below... Very interesting thought Spacespider





Its goal is to generate temperatures of more than 100 million degrees Celsius and pressures billions of times higher than those found anywhere else on earth, from a speck of fuel little bigger than a pinhead. If successful, the experiment will mark the first step towards building a practical nuclear fusion power station and a source of almost limitless energy.

At a time when fossil fuel supplies are dwindling and fears about global warming are forcing governments to seek clean energy sources, fusion could provide the answer. Hydrogen, the fuel needed for fusion reactions, is among the most abundant in the universe. Building work on the £1.2 billion nuclear fusion experiment is due to be completed in spring.

Scientists at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in Livermore, nestled among the wine-producing vineyards of central California, will use a laser that concentrates 1,000 times the electric generating power of the United States into a billionth of a second.


[color=cyan]

The result should be an explosion in the 32ft-wide reaction chamber which will produce at least 10 times the amount of energy used to create it.

"We are creating the conditions that exist inside the sun," said Ed Moses, director of the facility. "It is like tapping into the real solar energy as fusion is the source of all energy in the world. It is really exciting physics, but beyond that there are huge social, economic and global problems that it can help to solve."

Inside a structure covering an area the size of three football pitches, a single infrared laser will be sent through almost a mile of lenses, mirrors and amplifiers to create a beam more than 10 billion times more powerful than a household light bulb.

Housed within a hanger-sized room that has to be pumped clear of dust to prevent impurities getting into the beam, the laser will then be split into 192 separate beams, converted into ultraviolet light and focused into a capsule at the centre of an aluminium and concrete-coated target chamber.

When the laser beams hit the inside of the capsule, they should generate high-energy X-rays that, within a few billionths of a second, compress the fuel pellet inside until its outer shell blows off.

This explosion of the fuel pellet shell produces an equal and opposite reaction that compresses the fuel itself together until nuclear fusion begins, releasing vast amounts of energy.



Scientists have been attempting to harness nuclear fusion since Albert Einstein’s equation E=mc², which he derived in 1905, raised the possibility that fusing atoms together could release tremendous amounts of energy.

Under Einstein’s theory, the amount of energy locked up in one gram of matter is enough to power 28,500 100-watt lightbulbs for a year.




www.telegraph.co.uk...

NAMASTE*******
edit on 7/20/13 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)





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