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Job market sucks...

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posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 01:42 PM
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I have skills and a few degrees in engineering/computer/technical, and I have to say that the job market blows. I literally have come to the conclusion the ONLY way anyone gets a decent job these days is if you KNOW SOMEONE at the hiring company that vouches for you, or pulls some strings...

Thank god I have a job, just trying to expand my horizons. If really feel bad for those that have no job, and can't find one...

My brother and I have slowly been looking into a product (doing some R&D on our own dime) and starting our own company. I think that is the future of employment, the shift away from the "factories" (as brought about by the Industrial Revolution) and a focus back to self employment (previously defined as baker, candle maker, butcher, black smith, etc.) before the Industrial Revolution...
edit on 16-7-2013 by pityocamptes because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by pityocamptes
 


Yep, no kidding. My best friend and I have been bouncing around with our own idea because honestly, branching out on one's own is quite possibly the best way to go. My dad owned a mid-sized corporation for decades and just to give you a head's up, owning one's own business can mean more hours/days worked (dad worked 7 days a week/12+ hours a day), more stress because everything is riding on you, and regularity of income. For us, summers were great but winter was when the cash dried up. Then, once you get "big", you may end up getting the "offer" from a larger corporation that, if you don't accept, they may find a way to crush you. At least that's what happened to my dad. All he has left now from that time is his house and the offer he received was $30 million about 13 years ago. So, if what you and your friend do "takes off", be ready for that. The "big boys" in every industry are about controlling their market share and have a tendency of either buying or squishing "upstarts".

I know I sound a bit negative but these are the things that people tend to forget when striking out on their own. If it wasn't worth it, I wouldn't be toying around with the idea with my best friend either.
My dad's company was making about a million a year (I was set to make $300k annually plus profit incentives on his retirement with him receiving $600k). He used to eat at the best restaurants in the city and owned a dozen cars (either



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by WhiteAlice
reply to post by pityocamptes
 


Yep, no kidding. My best friend and I have been bouncing around with our own idea because honestly, branching out on one's own is quite possibly the best way to go. My dad owned a mid-sized corporation for decades and just to give you a head's up, owning one's own business can mean more hours/days worked (dad worked 7 days a week/12+ hours a day), more stress because everything is riding on you, and regularity of income. For us, summers were great but winter was when the cash dried up. Then, once you get "big", you may end up getting the "offer" from a larger corporation that, if you don't accept, they may find a way to crush you. At least that's what happened to my dad. All he has left now from that time is his house and the offer he received was $30 million about 13 years ago. So, if what you and your friend do "takes off", be ready for that. The "big boys" in every industry are about controlling their market share and have a tendency of either buying or squishing "upstarts".

I know I sound a bit negative but these are the things that people tend to forget when striking out on their own. If it wasn't worth it, I wouldn't be toying around with the idea with my best friend either.
My dad's company was making about a million a year (I was set to make $300k annually plus profit incentives on his retirement with him receiving $600k). He used to eat at the best restaurants in the city and owned a dozen cars (either



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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If I had it to do all over again, instead of getting an MBA, I would have become a plumber or an electrician.



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
If I had it to do all over again, instead of getting an MBA, I would have become a plumber or an electrician.



Why?



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by pityocamptes
 


Because no matter what, people always NEED these services (and unlike project management and managers, they can't be outsourced). I would be making more money, not be underemployed, and likely build up to where others are working for me. Last time I paid for a plumber, I thought about it. I do a lot of construction, electrical, and plumbing work myself around the ranch, but I know when I'm in over my head, then call a pro. I know what I have to pay these guys, so I know how well they do.



edit on 16-7-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
reply to post by pityocamptes
 


Because no matter what, people always NEED these services (and unlike project management and managers, they can't be outsourced). I would be making more money, not be underemployed, and likely build up to where others are working for me. Last time I paid for a plumber, I thought about it. I do a lot of construction, electrical, and plumbing work myself around the ranch, but I know when I'm in over my head, then call a pro. I know what I have to pay these guys, so I know how well they do.



edit on 16-7-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)




...until you have to reach deep within the 'ole $hitter pipes... hahahahaha - thats when you call a pro, or set free the object you dropped in...



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by pityocamptes
 


Hmmm, that's actually a tricky question and I'm going to be brutally honest. No, he wasn't ever satisfied. He became an addict of money and power to the extent that nothing was ever enough and he drove his family away in a major way. He was investigated for racketeering by the FBI and would brag/joke about being a mafia. It wasn't that much of a joke. His need for success, money and power was so great that he threw even his family members, including his own mother and myself, under the bus. When he declared bankruptcy (was being legally pursued and price squeezed by the megacorp), he had nothing and noone. He attempted suicide and then, after we all rushed in to support him, he attempted suicide again. According to him, he had nothing to live for anymore. It skewed all of his perceptions. He actually did try to start up again several years later but pushed too hard to expand and left an opening to get his one store tanked, courtesy of his ex-wife (who received nothing for it) and the megacorp he angered so much. That time, it was personal. Funny thing is that I asked him how much he was making at just that one store and he said $30k a month. $30k a month was not enough in his book. He outright got addicted and blew his own expectations as what was a livable income out of the water. So no, don't think he was ever satisfied.

Bit of a cautionary tale. Oh and one more thing, even if your business does take off, set some aside for retirement. My dad didn't and guess who can't retire. Don't turn out like him.



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I have seriously looked into being a plumber, even as a women, but locally at least, there are no training programs, no on the job training, or apprenticeships and no one will hire you with out 2-5 years experience.
I love it when people say apply at McDonalds. We don't even have minimum wage jobs around here. There are so many people applying for McDonalds type jobs that even they can be super picky.



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 10:20 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
If I had it to do all over again, instead of getting an MBA, I would have become a plumber or an electrician.


"A pipe burst in a doctor’s house. He called a plumber. The plumber arrived, unpacked his tools, did mysterious plumber-type things for a while, and handed the doctor a bill for $600."

The doctor exclaimed, “This is ridiculous! I don’t even make that much as a doctor!”

The plumber waited for him to finish and quietly said, “Neither did I when I was a doctor.”



posted on Jul, 17 2013 @ 01:51 AM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
If I had it to do all over again, instead of getting an MBA, I would have become a plumber or an electrician.


This is true. My dad is a master electrician owning his own company for 30+ years. No formal education past high school.

Dad makes money hand over fist. During this economic downturn, he has boomed. During good economic times, he is still in the boom.

I realized this in time and after getting an Associates, I stopped (still debt free) instead of continuing for a Bachelors. I have tried to sway people who want to return to college or start college that instead, they need to do something useful. It's not all plumbing or electrical either, there is also HVAC and appliance repair; fridge, washer, and dryer. A person can get a start on any of these by getting a job doing it, or by getting an Associates in two years.

And if you think, oh but no one's hiring, that's crap. Call around. My father has never NOT been hiring for electrical work. With 0 experience he hires walk ins and the lowest he pays is $15/hour.

Edit: I forgot to say, another is a car mechanic. Mad cash to be had.
edit on 7/17/13 by Ameilia because: (no reason given)



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