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Accent when you talk. Do you have one?

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posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:01 PM
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I have a distinctive accent. I never realized it until I recently moved to a different state.

When I realized this. I started to over-pronounce some words with the embarrassment that people that I communicate with might not understand me.

They are very small words or the way I phrase things.

For instance.

The words "pill" and "peel" are both pronounced like "pill"

"hill" and "heel" ......"The tall blonde woman wore high hills"

"Pen" and "pin"...... "Can you hand me a ball point pin?"

Here is a phrase that would sound funny to other people....

"Are we going to Disneyland or no?"

I have been told my accent is a cross between Canadian with a slight Spanish accent.

(We tend to say "Eh" a lot.) lol.

"John Elway was all bad eh. " (meaning John Elway was a good quarterback)

Now living in my new state I often get asked where I'm from.

They can never guess. I've been told a few times Manhattan, NY.

But I grew up no where near NY.

You get a star if you can guess where I'm from.


So any of you carry a regional accent?

Do you hide it?

Do you love it?

Do you hate it?




posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by Frankenchrist
 


Everybody else does but I don't

edit on 15-7-2013 by XLR8R because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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I have been told I have an Ohio accent...
I have no idea what that means.

I can't hear any differences in most people's regional accents except for the very obvious ones like the south, Boston or New England.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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Saying "no" instead of "not" is Scottish.

"are we going up the highlands or no"

Saying Eh! is scottish too.

I'm Scottish and everyone in my town speaks like that, I'm from Dundee

The Scots moved to Canada, thats why Canadians speak with some Scottish words, like saying "aboot" instead of "about"

"What are you talking aboot"

Nova Scotia means "new scotland"

en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...

You have Scottish roots.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:18 PM
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Everyone has an accent, to someone else.

I have been asked where I'm from because I "speak English to well to be American."



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by roughycannon
 


Lol! Maybe.

Where I'm from we don't have too many Scotts in the state. And not much, if any in our history.

Anything is possible though.

We do tend to throw Spanish words into English sentences.

When hanging up the phone we don't say "goodbye"

We say "bueno bye"



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:26 PM
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From around here in may neck o'ter woods










posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:27 PM
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I have been told i sound like a southern retard who lost his tongue in iraq and is currently strangling a chicken while yodeling...
edit on 15-7-2013 by TsukiLunar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:36 PM
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I have a Southern US accent, which comes out when I'm tired or tipsy. It's rather like an English accent. I'm told that linguistically, the two accents are similar. Ever heard that?



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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OTR trucker for 14 years--US and Canada.

I speak English, Canadian, Redneckian, Joisian, Creole, Hillbilly, New Yorkian, Bahstonian,
Californese, Portlandish and Texan.

...the rest of you I just can't understand



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:40 PM
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There are some celebrities that are from my state or have lived there long enough to pick up the accent.

Steve-O from Jackass. I watched a video and he did a stunt where he proceeded to burn the skin off his face and hands.

A guy asks him "Are you OK?"

Steve-O then replies in a thick accent " Not even."

Just what he said and the way he said it, I knew where he was from.

And last week I was watching Celebrity Ghost Stories.

Coco (Ice Ts wife) was on telling her story and she said "fill" instead of "feel".

"I could fill his breath blowing on my hair"

I busted out laughing and had to look her up.

Sure enough. She's from my city.
edit on 15-7-2013 by Frankenchrist because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by Frankenchrist
I have a distinctive accent. I never realized it until I recently moved to a different state.

When I realized this. I started to over-pronounce some words with the embarrassment that people that I communicate with might not understand me.

They are very small words or the way I phrase things.

For instance.

The words "pill" and "peel" are both pronounced like "pill"

"hill" and "heel" ......"The tall blonde woman wore high hills"

"Pen" and "pin"...... "Can you hand me a ball point pin?"

Here is a phrase that would sound funny to other people....

"Are we going to Disneyland or no?"

I have been told my accent is a cross between Canadian with a slight Spanish accent.

(We tend to say "Eh" a lot.) lol.

"John Elway was all bad eh. " (meaning John Elway was a good quarterback)

Now living in my new state I often get asked where I'm from.

They can never guess. I've been told a few times Manhattan, NY.

But I grew up no where near NY.

You get a star if you can guess where I'm from.


So any of you carry a regional accent?

Do you hide it?

Do you love it?

Do you hate it?



It's called "dialect", not accent. An accent is when you pronounce words that are from a different language than your mother tongue in a strange way. Like how Arnold Schwarzenegger speaks English with an Austrian accent.

A dialect is regional. Having said that, I live in the south, unfortunately. I hate it here. I'm surrounded by idiots and everyone has a southern dialect. I was raised here, and in a sense, I do use words from the southern dialect, but I do not pronounce them the same.

For instance, I say "y'all" and pronounce it normally such as - yall. But southerners around here say "Yawll"

I say "fixing to", as in I'm fixing to do something. Fixing means about down here. I'm about to do something. I'm fixing to do something. But people here say "fixin' ta"

There are a plethora of other southern words that I refuse to use in light of better options. Like "over yonder", "supper" (it's dinner dammit), "sum'm" (something), etc.

Also there are universal words that are pronounced completely idiotically down here. Like "France" for instance is pronounced "Fray-yance" like it has two syllables. Idiots. Same goes for dance "day-yance"

Instead of "light" or "right", down here it's "laaaat" or "raaat"

Have you ever heard the play on words where you say "Rise up lights" as normally as possible, and it actually sounds like an Australian saying "Razor blades"? It's pretty funny actually if you try it.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:49 PM
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I tend to adopt the accent of wherever I've gone.... I do it subconsciously. I don't mean to.

I've had a southern accent, an English accent, and mish-mashes of others. If I'm in a really rural area, I'll quickly lapse into southern (right along with the Yes Sirs and No Maams)....without even thinking. If around those that are English, I have to be careful not to lapse into that, or I may come off as mocking them...when really, I just used to have a lot of English teachers, so had that accent for about 3 years.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:51 PM
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Aside from saying like a lot and a few other terms associated with"valley girl" I talk the same way you hear most t.v. personalities speak on t.v. So no cool accent here.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:54 PM
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I have a Mid-north Eastern accent common to all those living in or around Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ohio.

Ya know...

Cirque



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:03 PM
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How about newfinese, lol.




posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:05 PM
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I'm very proud of my southern drawl.


I've lived in many places and I must say its one of the more interesting accents.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:10 PM
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I was brought up in an area where the word "go" is pronounced as "goo" (There's a puzzle for you to solve).
My teacher parents came from outside the area, and I rather prided myself on not having the local accent. I most certainly do not say "goo".
Yet when fellow-students in a different part of the country were discussing the question of accents, I was rather mortified when one of them observed that I pronounce "going" as "goo-ing". And now I listen carefully, I've got to admit that I do. It feels natural.
So the local accents may have more influence on us than we realise.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by Frankenchrist
 


My accent is hard to pin down. This is because of the heavy Welsh influence on my genetics, rather than having grown up around speakers of the Welsh tongue. Basically, there is a particular shape to a welsh palate, which I have. However, I grew up in Essex. Now, I do not speak with a Welsh accent, because as previously mentioned, I havent grown up around people who do. However, I grew up around the folk of Essex, and I do not have an Essex accent either.

Because my palate is shaped in such a way as to promote rich vowel sounds, and because unlike many of my fellow Essex residents, I actually believe that the letter T actually exists, my accent sometimes comes across as somewhat upper crust, despite my appearance, and for that matter, that of my bank account. I was once accused of being posh at a wedding, which made myself and my date snort imitation champagne out of our noses, me especially, since unlike everyone else at the doo, I was the only person who had dressed themselves for less than three hundred quid. Hell, I was wearing military style boots and combat trousers, as well as a jacket and tie!

I have been confused for Australian, South African, and a person from Surrey (county in England) all in the past year. However, those incidents are some of the stranger examples. Most people instantly assume that I have had a university education upon first meeting me, which I can only assume is because of my palate and my determination not to butcher the English language every time I speak, which is something that persons of my generation are expected to do, something that my fellow metalheads are falsely accused off despite being fairly well spoken in my expirience, and something that persons from Essex are widely publicised to do on a regular basis, entirely fairly it has to be said.

However, the question is somewhat bizzare. Everyone has AN accent. Every person, born on the planet who has the ability to speak and uses it, absorbs certain traits from thier learning environment and the people around whom they spend the most time. Everyone. Therefore, if you take a person from one place, and put them in another, wether they speak the same language or not, you will always find them tripping over differences in pronunciation between one region and another. For instance, there are no native residents of Manchester, born and bred, who speak as if they were born in Essex. There are no residents of Elgin in Scotland, who could easily be mistaken for Welsh persons, aside from by the most cloth eared waste of space on the planet of course.

Interestingly, despite my Welsh palate, I have never been mistaken for a resident of that wonderful and gorgeous land.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:20 PM
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I speak the most recognizably English-North American accent to date.

I made sure growing up to have nothing distinct about it.




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