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Daring to be Different in the Black Community

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posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:40 PM
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I am going to go out on a limb here and say I think more AAs think like BC then you realize, just a personal observation.




posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by Stormdancer777
I am going to go out on a limb here and say I think more AAs think like BC then you realize, just a personal observation.


Here is another observation:

When we the people are fighting between ourselves they are not fighting the thing they should be :government.

A house divided is easily conquered

A house united are the masters of their own destinies.
edit on 15-7-2013 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by Stormdancer777
I am going to go out on a limb here and say I think more AAs think like BC then you realize, just a personal observation.


I'm AA and I don't appreciate being stereotyped....



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by AceWombat04
In my mind and in my heart, people are just people. It's only circumstances that differ. And when enough people share in a circumstance, they begin to identify themselves by that circumstance and label themselves as said circumstance. Then they label those who don't share in it as "other." To me, that's the true source of racism and divisions in our human family (I do see us as one family, even though I get a lot of flack for that from people all across the human spectrum.)

I once had a conversation with a black friend during which he realized that virtually everything he identified as culturally "black" was true of me as well, simply because I had grown up very impoverished and in the inner city. I said, "Well, that's a circumstance. That's now who we are. And it can apply to anyone equally, regardless of ethnicity. Who we are is distinct from the circumstance, even if it does shape us and influence who we are." He got angry and said, "Yeah, but your parents and grandparents didn't get sprayed with fire hoses just for standing up for their rights." It was food for thought for both of us in different ways, and I actually did concede the point.

What I've come to believe is this. Racism does exist and so-called white privilege also exists. As one of my favorite comedians once said, "If you're white, even if you aren't racist, you benefit from racism whether you want to or not or know it or not." Double standards exist in the justice system, and sometimes they're predicated upon ethnicity or profiling and sometimes they aren't. When it's obvious that they are, I think there's an impetus to stand up against that. But sometimes it isn't the case even when people are inclined to think it is, or it isn't fully clear whether it is or not. That's when it becomes complicated and such divisions and conflicts emerge.

Because people identify with their circumstance and make it part of their identity, if there's a question as to whether something was unjust or wasn't, people factionalize and polarize along circumstantial lines. (What they mislabel ethnic lines in my opinion. To me, there are no ethnic lines. Only circumstantial ... and especially financial... lines.)

In short, I love everyone and view everyone as my family. The real adversary to us all, from where I sit, is the war against the middle class and the expansion of poverty. The last thing those with the power and the money to shape our national narrative and perception want is for us to be unified and at peace with one another. Factionalization benefits them and gives them lots of strawmen for us to rally around. I refuse to play that game personally. That doesn't mean I won't speak out against injustice when I see it. It does mean I refuse to see people as something other than what I am. Part of the human family.

Peace.


You put that so much better than I did in my attempt to say exactly the same thing.

It is the environment we grow up in that defines us and our attitudes, not our colour, or class origin.
you put a mixed race child from poor parents with a rich white family and you get a solicitor(lawyer).
Thats my maternal half brother, born before me in a time when racial mixing was a no no.
He was adopted due to the pressure of my mother being white with a black child in the early 70's.
He did well for himself in his situation. Whereas I didnt in the poor environment,
People with opportunities generally do well, those that dont get opportunities dont do so well.

Opportunities usually go to those with the money and connections to create them.
The poor(of all races) have to work a lot harder to create their own opportunities, and the reason those around them are judgmental when they do is because it makes them feel inferior for not having the testicular fortitude to have climbed their own way out of being poor.
You are bad for being successful, because it means their lack of achievement cannot be blamed on anyone but themselves.
People dont like to face truths that hard, so you are bad. Like I said before, people do some strange things in their own heads to justify their position to themselves. But they are family and you should be doing your best to reconcile your differences and develop better understanding, even within your own family.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by LizardSlicks
 



That's all you got out of the OP because that's all your listening for and the only part you understand.
I guess so….maybe because I’m not looking for something to be offended by….




What is "everything blacks are supposed to agree with"? Seriously, is that a thing where a portion of the black population has an inflammatory viewpoint and this is the voice being thrust into the microphone, this is what we can hear, so that must be what they think and feel?
You’d have to ask BC about that (or the many blacks who get destroyed publically for not being “black enough”). I didn’t coin the term. I don’t look at things through a racial prism.




I know you are not trying to be unfair or insensitive but do you see how easily it is to just skim over the top of these things and not give it a second or third thought and thus end up without a true picture of what is going on, especially so when you have only ever occupied one side of the spectrum. It has nothing to do with embittered blacks blindly celebrating Obama as a black president, or anything close to that. It has to do with what you are accustomed to listening for and the understanding or lack thereoff that you have acquired from this flawed method of media that is reinforced by the absence of a balanced foundation for understanding such inequalities to begin with. How do we know we're wrong if we're told otherwise?
So I have no ability to comprehend what the OP said because “I’ve only occupied one side of the spectrum” and the media has melted my brain?

I think you make some good points but they are from a far out perspective. Many of us are trying to understand why some people chose to rake others over the coals like this.

Maybe you’re right….I just don’t see it.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:47 PM
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Originally posted by olaru12

Originally posted by muzzleflash

Originally posted by olaru12

Originally posted by muzzleflash





I see this entire thing as progress already. I feel like our society is taking a step forward through this controversy.



I hope your are right....

But as I watch Fox and posting at the same time; it looks as if the exact opposite is transpiring. Sorry!


If you EVER watch the MSM be prepared to be fooled.

What you think those garbage outlets and their garbage opinions have any bearing on real humans in real society? I hope not.

I hope everyone turns that nonsense off asap. It only hurts and clouds minds.


If you honestly think that Rush and Beck have no bearing on real humans in real society....
I can show you astonishing statistics on their actual impact politically and culturally. They are AM Gods!!!!
People aren't going to turn off any media that supports their ideologies and personal agendas and the radio Gods will continue to give their audience what they crave; a place to belong. Much like ATS....


What I meant was that you cannot judge the opinions of millions of people based entirely on the propaganda a specific news outlet produces.

Just because it is popular doesn't mean everyone believes or agrees. A lot of people that watch FOX disagree and simply want to know what crazy stuff they will say next.

That is what is happening here. People are associating their view of FOX NEWS with anyone who happens to be on the "other side of the debate". Or vice versa with CNN or whatever.

This is a major source of misunderstanding and misconceptions.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by NavyDoc

Originally posted by LizardSlicks
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


You were replying to a post about "abandoning culture". The OP has done much more to that than eat some other food based upon what beliefs and ideas she has that she has shared, yet you equated her encompassing aversion and far reaching put down of the black community as a whole to you eating mexican food. Trust me there was nothing in your post that was too abstract for somebody else to appreciate. It just wasn't accurate or as effective a comparison as you believe it to be. It was a worthless response because of how irrelevant the comparison was which I paralleled with the part in my post about stereotypical african american food.


How is striving for an education and certain political beliefs abandoning "black culture?" Would not equating such things to a racial group a racist stance?

If striving for an education is "abandoning black culture" then are you not suggesting that lack of education is part of black culture?
edit on 15-7-2013 by NavyDoc because: (no reason given)



?

Now how did you deduct that from anything I've said. I haven't mentioned nor addressed education once in my post here, and don't care much at all about any political aspects to it. You just made yourself look more feeble than you hopefully are. Good luck, really.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:48 PM
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Why would we want people like BC to represent her community?

When we have people like Rev.Sharpton and Jesse Jackson.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:50 PM
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I read on some of the comments that when you live in an area where the whites and blacks reinforce each other's stereotypes, it's easy to have racism run rampant. I have to agree. I was one of them, but I'd like to show you how I managed to "break the cycle".

I grew up in Compton, CA in the 80's to early 2000's. I was taught growing up that the poverty around me was the "white persons fault". "They will do anything to keep you down and keep you from succeeding." "White people live to stab you in the back." Those are some of the beliefs I grew up with. So, I hated them. My goal was to be a dump truck driver, or a street sweeper, since they made "good money". Then my dad took me camping in Big Bear. There, my curiosity got the best of me. I started hanging out with some white people my age. I was about 15 or 16. But, I never turned my back to them or trusted them. I was ready for their eventual betrayal. Well, we ended up playing tag in the woods at dusk. The object was you can't just use your sight. You have to use your other senses too. I agreed to play so I could prove myself right. I had an escape plan all laid out. Well, I ended up hiding with another one of my companions by a log. His voice seemed deeper, but I thought he was trying to scare me. When I turned to look at him, I saw the swastika on his forehead, and he told me "You're gonna die here, (racist word)." It turns out that skinheads followed us into the woods and waited for me to separate myself. He didn't know that I was prepared for this attack, although it came from a different source than I expected. I saw his knife, and I don't remember much after that. I only remember running through the woods hearing him screaming about his nose being broken and how they were gonna kill me. Then I was tackled, and I thought I had a fight on my hands. Too my shock the person who tackled me yanked me too my feet, and then the rest of the group I was with formed a line in front of me, facing off the skinheads, who all had knives. They told the skinheads, "You want him, you get through us".
I was floored. The skinheads backed off, and I didn't say a word as they led me back to the tent we hung out in. A section of my belief system had been shattered. White people weren't the evil demons that I'd been told they are. Many people heard what was going on and rallied around me. I couldn't believe that white people were being so good to me. And they wanted nothing in return. After that, I determined that, instead of assuming every white person is racist, assume they're not, and let them prove they are. I had alot easier time "navigating through society" with that attitude.
Of course I was called "uncle tom" and told I thought I was better than them. I was accused of turning myself into a slave to them. But, I noticed that when I was naturally respectful and kind to them. They treated me well. Even if they tried to take advantage of me and learned that I do NOT tolerate that and I will make it know, they still respected me. The ones who hated me after we had that conversation, well, they weren't very well liked anyway.
What I'm trying to say is, in my experience, if you project a certain attitude, people will feed off of that. You can label yourself as one of "those people" by the way you walk, your facial expression, body language, ect... That goes for any race. So you can "break the cycle", maybe not in areas that are full of hate, but those are in the minority. There's a whole lot more neighborhoods that don't think like that.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:56 PM
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Excellent post OP, and very brave of you to take the stance that you have.


Originally posted by ButterCookie
We have conceded to life-long victim-hood, and excuse making, shifting the blame on others, especially other races and I hate it.

You can thank people like Jesse Jackson, and Al Sharpton for that, not to mention the Bill Clintons, Barbara Boxers, Dianne feinsteins, Ted Kennedys, etc. They are terrified at the very thought of racial harmony, as they would all lose their very lucrative jobs.



1. How do we think black slaves came to America? Do we think that Europeans just waltzed onto the African shoreline and grabbed slaves? No. African Kings and Queens SOLD their subjects into slavery.
2. Why do we think the entire Civil Rights movement was about our skin color? It was MOSTLY about white private business owners mad at the GOVERNMENT, not blacks, for forcing them to turn their private businesses into public ones.

And you will never hear any of the above-mentioned repeat these facts because they don't fit the agenda.



If slavery is the answer to all of the black community's problems, then why can't we trace these behaviors and issues all the way to the Reconstruction Era? Seems like those problems would be detected to the generations much closer to slavery, rather than just popping up in this era.

And again, the fault of the above-mentioned. They just weren't around at the time.

And what's worse is that we now have people in very high places encouraging their behaviour. I don't see any hope of it changing anytime soon.

Unfortunately, the very people who many of the black community are relying on for truth have set them back immeasurably by convincing them that they are victims and "can't make it in a white man's world".



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by olaru12
 


I guess you are not going to turn off Chris Matthews and Ed Schultz any time soon, either.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:05 PM
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To whom may find my comments worth a note.

After pondering this thread a few hours out and about in the world today I took note of the differences I saw and my thoughts. It was surreal in a way.

I saw an obese woman, I saw a bald headed guy, I saw a younger girl with cellulite, I saw another cute chick with a fro (really want one lol). I saw black, white, asian, and other ethnicity groups but I didn't pay as much attention to skin color.

When I went to the Krystal (LOVE ME SOME KRYSTALS) there were all black people working there because I was downtown and that's what I expected. It's location is prominently in a black neighborhood. I can HONESTLY say I wasn't scared. Maybe I have no fear because I went to school with mostly black people in the middle of the projects. They taught me how to dance and I made lasting friendships. My friends would come over and say my family "acted black". We are like a "black family". I never took offence to that AT ALL.

I think a big problem with differences is people are scared to speak what they feel.

Back to Krystals... There is always this one woman who calls me baby and she puts a smile on my face each and every time. I did notice her gold tooth as it was shining pretty good when she smiled at me.


I wondered if my thoughts were racist and if noticing and pondering differences may be normal.

I think it is.

To say the obese womans history comes with a lot of obesity may or may not be true. Who knows, but chances are many in her family are obese. I wondered the same about the bald headed guy. Does his family have a history of such.. um.... baldness? Probably but I didn't ask him to be sure.

My point is as long as there are bodies with eyes and a mind to think with there will always be differences noted in the human mind. We all have a history and some of the stories are not so pretty.

I recently found out I had african american on my dads side. From Angola to be exact (1700's). The woman I showed property to that had the pretty fro was also from Angola and she got a kick out of me telling her I had an ancestor from there. I even joked with one of my black girlfriends that I now have no idea what to pick when something asks me for my race. lol

My daughter who is 13 has listed her friends in her contacts (which are from all over the world) as Niggah A, Niggah B, Niggah C, and so on. You get the picture. Her friends do not take offense. It's slang for them and is meant to show how close they are. Like.... it could read Sista A, Sista B but she has niggah and it means the same thing to them. So what!? Its the total opposite. It seems as if the younger ones are more comfortable with their differences and accept each other more so than my generation and the ones before me.

We ALL probably have a mixture (im sure im not the only one) and could be considered muts or if you prefer a nicer term.. brothers and sisters.

The media AND government MADE this trial (one of many) out to be a race issue. Some people bought it hook, line and sinker.

To say slavery is over is a mistake. WE ARE ALL SLAVES to a system of greed, power, and hate. Don't like it? Change it!

Love you Buttercookie!!!!



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:08 PM
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I rember meeting a bunch of black Hebrew Israelites whilst shopping one day, talk about the most nasty hate ridden people one could care to meet. Basically they told me black people CAN'T be racists, and I totally believe that they actually believed it too!



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by ButterCookie
 


Great post, stay strong and surround yourself with positive influences. If you can get just 1 other person to see things as you do then it is worth everything.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by ThirdEyeofHorus
reply to post by olaru12
 


I guess you are not going to turn off Chris Matthews and Ed Schultz any time soon, either.


What? You aren't going to call me a commie like you did in the past. I'm disappointed....


More stereotyping on your part eh?

I am more than capable of being a liberal/progressive entirely on my own with out any outside influence. I make no apologies either.

Keep up the divisiveness, you are a master of your craft!!!


edit on 15-7-2013 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


You do have the ability to comprehend these things, but only after you've been exposed to them enough to feel and understand the nuances and subtleties rather than just see the differences that are apparent.

Some people have a better chance than others to overstand. The fact that you are thinking and listening greatly heightens the chances of rising to see things from a viewpoint that's fuller. You are one of the only people that have replied that haven't gotten outwardly defensive about things.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by MamaJ
 


Being born in the south side of Chicago, I busted up with laughter after reading this~



My daughter who is 13 has listed her friends in her contacts (which are from all over the world) as Niggah A, Niggah B, Niggah C, and so on. You get the picture. Her friends do not take offense. It's slang for them and is meant to show how close they are. Like.... it could read Sista A, Sista B but she has niggah and it means the same thing to them. So what!? Its the total opposite. It seems as if the younger ones are more comfortable with their differences and accept each other more so than my generation and the ones before me.


You are absolutely correct, I'm 30 and I've had several talks with the younger generation(s) in high school and prior. The stereotypes we carried around in school and into the "real" are vague and if anything unbenounced to them or they just don't care. They have a way of seeing past the crap that many were indocterinated to believe as fact when it's actually not. In this sense, the future might not be as bad as some postulate it will be


If I could applaud you I would!




posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by ButterCookie
 





I have encountered people like luciddream...


i must meet them! these people that respect their own culture and do and not jump ship when things get bad or when the "grass is greener on the other side"...

What the hell, was that conservative thinking in my head? NOoooo!



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by luciddream
reply to post by ButterCookie
 





I have encountered people like luciddream...


i must meet them! these people that respect their own culture and do and not jump ship when things get bad or when the "grass is greener on the other side"...

What the hell, was that conservative thinking in my head? NOoooo!


can you please define this culture, because i have been trying to define mine, but I cant.
Im in no way saying you cant, Im just interested in hearing what you consider your culture to be.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by luciddream
 


Seems like you jumped ship from a racist white culture, to liberal culture. Sounds pretty hypocritical to me. You didn't exactly paint your family in a good light either, and you obviously jumped ship.

Or was this post sarcasm, that you think would be ridiculous and would make the OP look bad?

I was born in Wisconsin, and somehow I ended up in Texas most of my family are ultra conservatives that vote Republican no matter what. I guess I'm the only liberal in my family and I've been called a "bleeding heart liberal" several times by my father.

Also I know that some of my family members were involved in the KKK and all those disgusting racist groups back in the 50's and 60's.

My point is, that there are uneducated racists people in EVERY culture and they are not confined to a certain skin color or culture, and the OP is somehow making all of you believe that being racist and uneducated is a trait of the black culture and that's sad.

This thread just exposes a lot of ATS posters

edit on Mon, 15 Jul 2013 16:33:03 -0500 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



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