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Italian Neurosurgeon says he is ready to transplant heads...

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posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 04:59 AM
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Ok,

I can understand the importance of transplanting certain organs for saving a human life but just why would you want to have a head transplant?


GOT your head screwed on right?

This may become a pertinent question if this neuroscientist gets his way - he wants to begin transplanting heads.

Doctor Sergio Canavero of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group has outlined a medical procedure which he says will successfully connect a brain to a spinal chord - the major challenge for any such operation.

Link here : www.news.com.au...

In 1970, the first cephalosomatic linkage was achieved in the monkey. However, the technology did not exist for reconnecting the spinal cord, and this line of research was no longer pursued. In this paper, an outline for the first total cephalic exchange in man is provided and spinal reconnection is described. The use of fusogens, special membrane-fusion substances, is discussed in view of the first human cord linkage. Several human diseases without cure might benefit from the procedure.

Full article here : www.surgicalneurologyint.com...


I guess that if i had 15 million dollars to spend there would be no way i would do that just to hold another mans willy when i go for my morning pee!

SO, my question to you all is the following : If you had a spare 15 million to spend and were suffering from some incurable ailment that could be cured by a head transplant, what would you opt for?

My answer to this question would be : Quit while you are aHEAD!

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 12-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Word added
edit on 12-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Phrase added




posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:14 AM
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Hi Rodinus

What the bloody hell?

Just as i am getting my head back together after last nights death thread
its just gone now. This is the begining's of the sci-fi's we have read, star trek stargate progs.


In 1970, Robert White and his colleagues successfully transplanted the head of a rhesus monkey on the body of another one, whose head had simultaneously been removed. The monkey lived 8 days and was, by all measures, normal, having suffered no complications. [28] A few years later, he wrote: "…What has been accomplished in the animal model - prolonged hypothermic preservation and cephalic transplantation, is fully accomplishable in the human sphere. Whether such dramatic procedures will ever be justified in the human area must wait not only upon the continued advance of medical science but more appropriately the moral and social justification of such procedural undertakings." [29] In 1999, he predicted that "…what has always been the stuff of science fiction - the Frankenstein legend, in which an entire human being is constructed by sewing various body parts together - will become a clinical reality early in the 21st century… brain transplantation, at least initially, will really be head transplantation - or body transplantation, depending on your perspective… with the significant improvements in surgical techniques and postoperative management since then, it is now possible to consider adapting the head-transplant technique to humans."[30]


as the site stated "moral implications"

cheers Rodinus
dave



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:17 AM
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I can see I already ultra rich people at 80 undergoing body transplants, with young people who died from head trauma.



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:19 AM
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reply to post by AthlonSavage
 


I can see bloody Walt Disney coming back

Cryogenetics
abcnews.go.com...



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:26 AM
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Originally posted by davesmart
reply to post by AthlonSavage
 


I can see bloody Walt Disney coming back

Cryogenetics
abcnews.go.com...


So maybe Ted Williams might become the first Guinea Pig!

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:29 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


Bro please...iv'e got to take a break now

and your sig still makes me piss myself



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:32 AM
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perhaps some heads could be transplanted on pigs bodies ore reverse ?



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by davesmart
 



The other signature i wanted to use was : Why disinfect the injection site of the criminal when he recieves the lethal injection? (i could actually use that now as the criminals body may be used for transplantation purposes!?)

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 12-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Crap spelling



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:34 AM
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Originally posted by ressiv
perhaps some heads could be transplanted on pigs bodies ore reverse ?


Yes, but what would this achieve?

And to be quite honest and looking around at some of TBTB this may have already been carried out!

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:38 AM
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Originally posted by Rodinus
reply to post by davesmart
 



The other signature i wanted to use was : Why disinfect the injection site of the criminal when he recieves the lethal injection? (i could actually use that now as the criminals body may be used for transplantation purposes!?)

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 12-7-2013 by Rodinus because: Crap spelling


Ive not laughed this much since i seen chubby brown on stage, the fat bastard as he likes to be called





posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:39 AM
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Well that's just dandy! My husband has always said that when he goes he wants his head cryogenic ally frozen so that he can eventually go on to think more and learn more. It's always been a bit of a creepy thought for me, having someone decapitate my husbands head after he's gone and I honestly assumed that the technology would never be THERE to make it work for him.

Now what can I do!!!



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:41 AM
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If someone put my head one someone elses body, I would be concerned I was touching someone elses John Thomas when I went to the loo.

But then I suppose its not my hand either sooo........



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:42 AM
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Originally posted by Pixiefyre
Well that's just dandy! My husband has always said that when he goes he wants his head cryogenic ally frozen so that he can eventually go on to think more and learn more. It's always been a bit of a creepy thought for me, having someone decapitate my husbands head after he's gone and I honestly assumed that the technology would never be THERE to make it work for him.

Now what can I do!!!


Maybe you might want to tell him this :

Many critics say the companies that perform cryonics are simply ripping off customers with the dream of immortality and they won’t deliver. It doesn’t help that the scientists who perform cryonics say they haven’t successfully revived anyone, and don’t expect to be able to do so anytime soon. The largest hurdle is that, if the warming process isn’t done at exactly the right speed and temperature, the cells could form ice crystals and shatter.

Link here : zidbits.com...

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:45 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


Interesting. I wonder however, how likely it is that an entire donor BODY would be available for such a proceedure. Also, I wonder how well a brain would be able to take command of a new body, how well it would be able to regulate the heartbeat of an unfamiliar heart, how fast it would learn how this body works, what its quirks and ideosyncrasies are, and what they add up to in terms of differences in operation.

And of course, there is the big one. Surely the risk of transplant rejection in such a proceedure is much higher than with other transplant operations? I mean, we are talking about replacing the central processing unit which controls every chemical interchange in the bodies lexicon of operations.

Furthermore, in the event that the actual operation is one hundred percent successful, and the brain adjusts to its new surroundings well, the patient attains full motor control of the donor body, and all seems well. Wont the body have different allergies and weaknesses ? And how likely is a full acceptance by the body, of the new brain, or brain of body for that matter? How likely is a one hundred percent uptake in neurotransmission between the brain and the body? How would one prepare a body for such an operation, or indeed the head?

I find the entire idea utterly bizzare. To my mind, if one has copped it so severely that a new body is required, one ought to do the decent thing and be off to the other place, not hang around on someone elses corpse out of sheer bloody stubbornness!



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:51 AM
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Also saw this which caught my eye in another article :

Published in the June issue of Surgical Neurology International, the project has been outlined by Italian neuroscientist and functional neurosurgeon, Dr. Sergio Canavero. He says the procedure would take 100 surgeons 36 hours to complete, and would cost around £8.5 million ($12.6 million).

100 SURGEONS!!!

Seems he has also knocked the prices down in-between the link from the 2nd of July in my first link to the 15th of July in this link :

www.medicalnewstoday.com...

I guess not that many people are too entheusiastic?

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:52 AM
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Originally posted by Rodinus
Ok,

I can understand the importance of transplanting certain organs for saving a human life but just why would you want to have a head transplant?




A person is in an accident, let's say he was riding a motorcycle.

He smashes his head in, and is pronounced dead at the scene...but the rest of his body is relatively intact.

The motorcycle hit a car side on, he is alive but won't be for long, as the impact crushed his body beyond repair but his head is relatively unscathed...get the picture?
The two are a tissue match, and suitable for transplanting for each other..
Take the head off the driver, transplant it onto the body of the biker and the car driver lives.

That kind of thing.

The potential for dodgy-ness is great here though...an aging billionaire might decide to 'aquire' a young body when his or her is dying riddled with disease...by transplanting his or her head onto a young body (assuming he or she doesn't have dementia) life can be extended greatly...although not for the person who became a 'body donor'.



edit on 12-7-2013 by MysterX because: added text



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:55 AM
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Awesome I need a new head. Mine is as rough as a robbers dog.



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:56 AM
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Originally posted by TrueBrit
reply to post by Rodinus
 


Interesting. I wonder however, how likely it is that an entire donor BODY would be available for such a proceedure. Also, I wonder how well a brain would be able to take command of a new body, how well it would be able to regulate the heartbeat of an unfamiliar heart, how fast it would learn how this body works, what its quirks and ideosyncrasies are, and what they add up to in terms of differences in operation.

And of course, there is the big one. Surely the risk of transplant rejection in such a proceedure is much higher than with other transplant operations? I mean, we are talking about replacing the central processing unit which controls every chemical interchange in the bodies lexicon of operations.

Furthermore, in the event that the actual operation is one hundred percent successful, and the brain adjusts to its new surroundings well, the patient attains full motor control of the donor body, and all seems well. Wont the body have different allergies and weaknesses ? And how likely is a full acceptance by the body, of the new brain, or brain of body for that matter? How likely is a one hundred percent uptake in neurotransmission between the brain and the body? How would one prepare a body for such an operation, or indeed the head?

I find the entire idea utterly bizzare. To my mind, if one has copped it so severely that a new body is required, one ought to do the decent thing and be off to the other place, not hang around on someone elses corpse out of sheer bloody stubbornness!


Transplant rejection would probably be the most difficult obstacle to jump and as you so pertinently say, apart from the brain having to go through a whole new apprentiship of learning how its new body works, there are also the major set backs of different pathologies stemming from this type of intervention.

And how do you get a full body quickly to the operating theater so quickly without all or partial internal organs deteriorationg?

There is actually a video of the primate head transplant on YT which i have chosen not to link to this thread for ethical reasons which also gives a little more insight into how the monkey reacts after transplantation.

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:57 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


That might work, but he's got a ways to go hopefully until he reaches that junction in his time, obviously things can change, but.....he always appreciates an intelligent, educated debate as opposed to emotional

It might work, if not....I'll have a hubbycicle to pass on to my child



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


The monkey is really sad, for I think it was 3 days he could see, he could respond, he could feel, but he could not eat.

I can't even look at those images or the 2 headed dog that was created, those poor things






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