Man with Stage 3 Colon Cancer Refuses Chemotherapy & Cures Himself with Vegan Diet

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posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 10:10 PM
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Okay so I saw this and thought it was pretty amazing. I have heard many stories like this one, usually with one thing in common; being cured of cancer DIY style without chemo and without following the doctor's advice.
The man in this video is Chris Ward and here he shares his story of how he refused chemotherapy and cured himself with a raw vegan diet.



I am not here to judge those that have or would choose chemo and radiation and such. Everyone is different and everyone is free to choose how they want to fight it, especially depending on the situation and severity. This is not a chemo or doctor bashing thread. I just wanted to present this to my fellow ATSers for intelligent discussion.

I personally believe I would go for the natural route such as Chris Ward did if I ever found myself in the same boat. However, I still don't know how things would actually be if it came to it. Nonetheless, I find this information intriguing. I also find it odd how many doctors never seem to address diet and diet plans. What say you ATSers?
edit on 11-7-2013 by Cherry0 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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So many diseases have been cured with diet alone, it should be common knowledge at this point. I suggest researching the Gerson therapy. Max Gerson cured cancer decades ago, with fresh fruits and veggies.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 10:28 PM
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My dad was recently diagnosed with bowel cancer after being diagnosed with Leukemia 4 years ago. He is now undergoing chemotherapy. I really wish he'd open his mind to alternative treatments but he is a stubborn old goat and has made up his mind (and nobody, come hell or high water, will change it). All I know is if (and likely when) I end up facing the same trial, I would rather try natural treatments than letting anyone inject me with chemicals that are almost more harmful to the body than the disease itself.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 10:33 PM
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The plant defense system is a powerful ally if needed. I cannot eat all veggies on a regular basis, but I am very aware that they can help me out as medicine if I need them. I can probably go vegan for two weeks with no lasting health problems but it would be very invasive if I went much longer. The same reason I was allergic to my meds is because of the meds being partially designed off of a similar chemistry to the plant defense system.

I think that these plant chemicals can kill cancer of the digestive tract. I am not sure as to dose or choice of plants that would best help to fight which type of cancer though. Some people can do vegan for a long time, That is not possible for me because of some inherited genetic changes.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 10:41 PM
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reply to post by tigershark1988
 


Heya, thanks Tiger. I looked up the Gerson Therapy. I found the Gerson.org site and bookmarked it. I'll take a closer look when I get the chance. Again thanks for the info.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by DeadSeraph
My dad was recently diagnosed with bowel cancer after being diagnosed with Leukemia 4 years ago. He is now undergoing chemotherapy. I really wish he'd open his mind to alternative treatments but he is a stubborn old goat and has made up his mind (and nobody, come hell or high water, will change it). All I know is if (and likely when) I end up facing the same trial, I would rather try natural treatments than letting anyone inject me with chemicals that are almost more harmful to the body than the disease itself.


I'm so sorry to hear that. I hope he gets through it alright. I can only imagine how tough it is to go through. Thoughts and prayers.

Yeah, I have always preferred the all natural route as well. Not all situations have called for it but I generally prefer it.
I have always find it kind of odd that, in regards to chemo, in order to kill the cancer you have do damage to your body that is already damaged by the cancer.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 11:04 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Honestly, I think I would have a hard time with a vegan diet as well. I was vegetarian for many years until we slowly added fish and poultry to our diets. No red meats though. But with vegan, that means no eggs or dairy and such. However, I'm sure if I got cancer I could see myself making those drastic changes to my diet in order to beat it.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by DeadSeraph
My dad was recently diagnosed with bowel cancer after being diagnosed with Leukemia 4 years ago. He is now undergoing chemotherapy. I really wish he'd open his mind to alternative treatments but he is a stubborn old goat and has made up his mind (and nobody, come hell or high water, will change it). All I know is if (and likely when) I end up facing the same trial, I would rather try natural treatments than letting anyone inject me with chemicals that are almost more harmful to the body than the disease itself.


I'm truly sorry to hear about your Dad. I always said I would go the alternative route if I ever got cancer, but when I did actually get diagnosed with an aggressive cancer, I chose the chemo and radiation. I am still alive to tell my story.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 11:12 PM
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Sorry, double post.
edit on 11-7-2013 by Night Star because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by Night Star

Originally posted by DeadSeraph
My dad was recently diagnosed with bowel cancer after being diagnosed with Leukemia 4 years ago. He is now undergoing chemotherapy. I really wish he'd open his mind to alternative treatments but he is a stubborn old goat and has made up his mind (and nobody, come hell or high water, will change it). All I know is if (and likely when) I end up facing the same trial, I would rather try natural treatments than letting anyone inject me with chemicals that are almost more harmful to the body than the disease itself.


I'm truly sorry to hear about your Dad. I always said I would go the alternative route if I ever got cancer, but when I did actually get diagnosed with an aggressive cancer, I chose the chemo and radiation. I am still alive to tell my story.


Glad to hear about your success story, and that you are still here to share it with us



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 11:25 PM
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reply to post by Night Star
 


Thanks for the reply. I'm glad it worked for you and are around to share your experiences.

I've always loved hearing/reading about others experiences in life, both the ups and downs. It certainly gives you more than one perspective on life.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by DeadSeraph
 


I'm 55, but many of the women who were recieving their treatments with me were older. Chemo these days is not like the chemo of years ago. Now they have pills for nausea. It is different for everyone depending on what kind of cancer, how far advanced and what kind of chemo you get. If you have any questions, feel free to send a private message.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 11:41 PM
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Originally posted by Cherry0
reply to post by Night Star
 


Thanks for the reply. I'm glad it worked for you and are around to share your experiences.

I've always loved hearing/reading about others experiences in life, both the ups and downs. It certainly gives you more than one perspective on life.


I too enjoy reading about other people's experiences in life.

I'm still too frightened to try any alternative medicines for something as serious as cancer. I think it is awesome that it has worked for some people, but there are so many variables. Nice to know we have options I guess.

Oh and...LOVE your avatar!



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by Night Star
 


Thanks! Love yours too! I've seen your elf poppin up around ATS.


I agree, it's great that there's so many treatment options available. What's good for one person might not be so for another. I can understand why you chose yours. It was your choice to make whether or not someone disagrees with it, again I'm glad you beat it! And yes, there are so many variables to look at. It can be crazy.

In the end, I suppose it all comes down to what the person wants, how they want to fight their battles in life. I don't like to tell people what to do but I will still always try to present cases such as the one in the OP with Chris Ward to anyone that's interested. Spreading information along of other available treatments is sorta my way of trying to help I think.



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 03:27 AM
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reply to post by Cherry0
 


I haven't watch the clip yet, but I've got to ask: I thought cancer occurred when a faulty gene started copying itself in the wrong way? If this is so, how can food stop this?

Note: Watched the clip. Ummm, he had the cancer surgically removed. He didn't cure it at all.
edit on 7/12/2013 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 03:34 AM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


The body's own immunity and ph balance ,have a lot to do with cancer replicating .
The body knows its not normal ,but if you ingest a lot of starches ,yeast and sugar ,the body's chemistry is ripe for cancer to grow .
Realign chemistry with certain foods ,cancer cells die . All of them . Be it tumor ,leukemia or just cells.
High oxygen levels in the blood alone can do this .

That being said,to the OP ,also check out the Budwig diet.
It cures many things ,but it known for its cancer eradication for the most part.



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 03:35 AM
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Originally posted by jiggerj
reply to post by Cherry0
 


I haven't watch the clip yet, but I've got to ask: I thought cancer occurred when a faulty gene started copying itself in the wrong way? If this is so, how can food stop this?


I'm admittedly ignorant to a lot of the specifics but I was under the impression genetics only signified a propensity towards vulnerability, and that cancer was actually caused by mutagenic cells? Hopefully someone can clarify. I remember reading an article some time back that seemed to indicate cancer was much less prevalent in the ancient world based on studies of egyptian mummies. This would imply that gene's do not "cause" cancer, but can be effected by it.
edit on 12-7-2013 by DeadSeraph because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 08:41 AM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Thanks for the reply Jigger. From what I have gathered, in stage 3 cancer, just removing the tumor and all involved lymph nodes doesn't just get rid of the cancer.



Stage III Colorectal Cancer

Stage III colorectal cancers have spread outside the colon to one or more lymph nodes (small structures that are found throughout the body that produce and store cells that fight infection). Tumors within the colon wall, which also involve the lymph nodes are classified as stage IIIA, while tumors that have grown through the colon wall and have spread to one to four lymph nodes are classified as stage IIIB cancers. Those tumors, which have spread to more than four lymph nodes are classified as stage IIIC colon cancers.

Treatment involves:


- Surgery to remove the tumor and all involved lymph nodes if possible.

- After surgery, the patient will receive chemotherapy with 5-FU, leucovorin and oxaliplatin, capecitabine with oxaliplatin or capecitabine alone.

- Radiation may be needed if the tumor is large and invading the tissue surrounding the colon.

The five-year survival rate for stage III colon cancer is about 64%. Patients with one to four positive lymph nodes have a higher survival rate than people with more than five positive lymph nodes.


WebMD.com



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 08:50 AM
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reply to post by DeadSeraph
 


I was just reading actually that cancer can occur in three main ways:


Sporadic cancers - these are cancers that occur by chance in individuals who have no known genetic risk factors and no significant family history. Approximately 60% of cancers are sporadic.



Familial cancers - these are cancers caused by variants in multiple genes and the environment all working together. In this case, each genetic variant causes a slight increase in risk. The overall risk of developing cancer depends on the number of cancer risk genetic variants that a person inherits and what environmental factors interact with those genes. Although these cancers appear to cluster in families, they don’t follow the typical rules of inheritance.



Hereditary cancers - these are cancers that are associated with a change in a single cancer susceptibility gene (like BRCA1 or BRCA2). These genes account for a very small percentage of all cancers. In fact, only 5-10% of breast and colon cancer cases are caused by changes in a single gene. Although everyone who carries a change in a cancer susceptibility gene does not get cancer, the risk is increased greatly, usually to 50% or higher. These types of genetic changes are passed on in an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern in families. This means that each child of an individual that carries a gene change in a hereditary cancer susceptibility gene has a 50% chance of inheriting the gene change.


I'm sure there are a lot of variables that we just aren't aware of.

My grandmother on my dad's side died of colon cancer before I was born actually. My dad's side of the family have often had bowel issues including me but no colon cancer from us yet, hopefully never. I do not know what kind she had or if it would run in the family. All I know is I try to take care of my health and my family's health the best I can, so that means smart food choices. I'd rather take preventative measures.



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 12:04 PM
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For every success alternative medicine makes, it seems that mass media only focuses on the failures...
Case in point, I didn't even know Steve Jobs had cancer until he died from it.





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