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Religious leanings of Freemasonry

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posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 03:29 AM
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With my plans to join the Freemasons soon, I've grown curious as to the specific religious aspects of Freemasonry. I know that the Knights Templar are extremely religiously-oriented, and that Masonic rituals involve reference to a "greater being", but I'm not quite sure what that means.

To put it into context, I have been baptized twice (once Protestant, at birth, then again Catholic at 8) but I am completely atheist. I know that the Catholic Church has condemned Freemasonry, but the group seems in many ways to borrow from Christian symbology. Any clarifications?

Thanks again to all the Masons who've responded to my questions; I can't wait for my process to begin.




posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 05:49 AM
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my old man is a mason i dont no nothing about it because he cant tell no1 because it a secret club thingy...... how did you come about on becoming a mason? also what lodge are you being placed in?
xxmintyxx



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 06:46 AM
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Technically if you declare yourself an atheist , you should not be allowed to join Freemasoney.

All the recognised Masonic Grand lodges require you to make a statement that you belive in a supreme being. It is the one question that you must answer , YES.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 06:47 AM
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Originally posted by Don Armageddon
With my plans to join the Freemasons soon, I've grown curious as to the specific religious aspects of Freemasonry. I know that the Knights Templar are extremely religiously-oriented, and that Masonic rituals involve reference to a "greater being", but I'm not quite sure what that means.

To put it into context, I have been baptized twice (once Protestant, at birth, then again Catholic at 8) but I am completely atheist. I know that the Catholic Church has condemned Freemasonry, but the group seems in many ways to borrow from Christian symbology. Any clarifications?

Thanks again to all the Masons who've responded to my questions; I can't wait for my process to begin.


Bad news DA, Freemasons don't care what your religion is but the one thing you CAN'T be is an Atheist. You must profess a belief in a Supreme Being (pick a being, any being... That should get the rabble rousers going), and I would caution against any attempt to subvert this requirement. That being said, the religious tone of Masonic ritual is such that I am not offended, nor are others offended at my presence and participation (I mention this because I am not a Christian), that is the beauty and a Tenet of Freemasonry. Sorry to break the bad news, but the fundamental requirement is an Ancient Landmark (the nineteenth to be exact), and is non-negotiable.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 07:05 AM
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So for some masoners this can be the Christian God, and for others this can be, say Satan?



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 07:35 AM
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Originally posted by Jakko
So for some masoners this can be the Christian God, and for others this can be, say Satan?


Satanism is a big no-no in Freemasonry, but technically, one could subvert the process. The real kicker is that the values associated with Satanism (that is, Anton LaVey, etc.) are incompatible with Masonry, and the Satantist will soon find himself in trouble once his beliefs are exposed thogh the natural course of lodge activities.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 07:38 AM
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Originally posted by Jakko
So for some masoners this can be the Christian God, and for others this can be, say Satan?



Ga-rate!

Post the pics of the masonic-satanist induction ceremony. This will make the price of goats go up!

I wonder if the ""worshipful master"" will wear chaps (hairy ones) and a mask? Will he use a pitchfork instead of a staff?



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 07:50 AM
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Originally posted by PublicGadfly

Originally posted by Jakko
So for some masoners this can be the Christian God, and for others this can be, say Satan?



Ga-rate!

Post the pics of the masonic-satanist induction ceremony. This will make the price of goats go up!

I wonder if the ""worshipful master"" will wear chaps (hairy ones) and a mask? Will he use a pitchfork instead of a staff?


No such things happen, Gadfly.

Give it a rest already. You've completely trashed your reputation on these boards (such that it was to begin with), and now you show up to engage in halfhearted attempts at insults and immaturity. Apparently, you're an adult, probably the most senior among us, yet your behaviour is that of a bored child.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 07:58 AM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me
Bad news DA, Freemasons don't care what your religion is but the one thing you CAN'T be is an Atheist. You must profess a belief in a Supreme Being (pick a being, any being... That should get the rabble rousers going), and I would caution against any attempt to subvert this requirement. That being said, the religious tone of Masonic ritual is such that I am not offended, nor are others offended at my presence and participation (I mention this because I am not a Christian), that is the beauty and a Tenet of Freemasonry. Sorry to break the bad news, but the fundamental requirement is an Ancient Landmark (the nineteenth to be exact), and is non-negotiable.


It is also true that because I belive in God, I am not alowed to be an Atheist?



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by billmcelligott
It is also true that because I belive in God, I am not alowed to be an Atheist?


Excellent point. The 2 are in conflict.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 10:26 AM
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Well, "Supreme Being" is a very broad term. I'll have to meditate on it from now until my process begins to see how it relates to me.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 11:44 AM
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Right. It is meant to be a broad term. Maosnry seeks people of faith, but also seeks to be as inclusive as possible.

As to the "Supreme Being" part: that's entirely up to you. It works on the honour system. We cannot prove that you do or do not believe, but if you are ill-intentioned or you became a Mason under false pretences, then Masons are quite gifted at noticing that in due course.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by billmcelligott
It is also true that because I belive in God, I am not alowed to be an Atheist?



Originally posted by intrepid
Excellent point. The 2 are in conflict.


Yes Bill, a belief in God (any God, pick one), and a philosophy of atheism, are diametrically opposed as our esteemed Canadian observer has conspicuously pointed out. If you would care to experiment in the duality of such a juxtaposition, be my guest, I personally eschew such conflicts as inherently unproductive. I do engage in the practice of pooling similar theologies as a means to better understand my own beliefs, and consequently of those around me (but not all, some escape even my noted ken
), but I would never want to burden others with my own personal choices.


dictionary.com
atheist n.
One who disbelieves or denies the existence of God or gods.

\A"the*ist\, n. [Gr. ? without god; 'a priv. + ? god: cf. F. ath['e]iste.] 1. One who disbelieves or denies the existence of a God, or supreme intelligent Being.

2. A godless person. [Obs.]

Syn: Infidel; unbeliever.

Note: See Infidel.
atheist
adj : related to or characterized by or given to atheism; "atheist leanings" [syn: atheistic, atheistical] n : someone who denies the existence of god.

Theologian Monkeys, not just for passing the plate on Sunday anymore



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by Jakko
So for some masoners this can be the Christian God, and for others this can be, say Satan?


No. Satan is a component of Judeo-Christian religious belief, and is not the Supreme Being. He is equivalent to the Persian Ahriman and Egyptian Set, meaning he opposes the Supreme Being.

Freemasonry does not recognize the existence of Satan or other sectarian dogmas. It does, however, recognize the belief in God, and also recognizes that different religions honor Him in different ways, and under different names relative to the various cultures.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 02:03 PM
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Well, here in Canada, a "supreme being" is a "supreme being" . . not necessarily God qua God. If a person wishes to call a nature deity of Taoism a "supreme being", then he may do so. In any case, up here, "supreme being" is the norm, and that phrase is not pressed any further.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 02:45 PM
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As a strong Christian, I dont see anything good about masonry. Although I only know little about it, I get a bad feeling from it. Just seems blasphemous.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 02:50 PM
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So by your own admission you have judged through ignorance.

Very Christian of you.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by Leveller
So by your own admission you have judged through ignorance.

Very Christian of you.


I havent judged anything. I said from the amount of knowledge I know on the subject, I get a bad "feeling" its not judging it at all. Intuition isnt caused by the minds thinking.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by LTD602
Well, here in Canada, a "supreme being" is a "supreme being" . . not necessarily God qua God. If a person wishes to call a nature deity of Taoism a "supreme being", then he may do so. In any case, up here, "supreme being" is the norm, and that phrase is not pressed any further.


The same is true here, as in most regular Grand Lodges. I think our only difference here is that I use the terms "God" and "Supreme Being" interchangeably. By "God", I do not necessarily mean a particular manner in which the Deity is viewed, i.e., the Christian view of God, or the Hebrew, Muslim, etc.
Freemasonry recognizes the existence of the Grand Architect of the Universe, Creator of heaven and earth, the Giver of all good gifts, and the Judge of the quick and the dead. All Masonic meetings open with the Chaplain invoking His Divine blessings, and close with the same. How the individual Brother perceives of God outside of these things is his personal opinions, and are grounded on his religious beliefs instead of his fraternity's teachings.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by Illuminous
As a strong Christian, I dont see anything good about masonry. Although I only know little about it, I get a bad feeling from it. Just seems blasphemous.


Which is why Freemasonry relies on it's Candidates to come forth and seek admission (apologies to the UK Brethren, I think your policy is flawed), you don't like it, don't join.

Think Freemasonry is bad? Go check out the Elks... Scary.


BPOE Monkeys, not just for Saturday night dances anymore...




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