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Freaky Webs

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posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 01:26 AM
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Hey, has anyone else been experiencing these freaky (spider) webs? It appears to be happening in at least 3 states simultaneously in the South Central U.S.:

www.snerdey.com...

Think it may have something to do with Global Warming?




posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 07:19 AM
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Here is a shot of the sun.. this is a picture so it's ok to look at it.


I think this comment really sums up this "phenomena". The things this person claims as webs could easily be scratches on the camera lens, bits of dirty, trick photography (notice the angle the photos are taken.. below the roofing pointed up. Any REAL webs stretching across the roofing could look like they are floating in the sky).

But yes, it probably isn't uncommon to see spider webs floating in the wind. They could get torn loose by people, or whatever, and get blown about before finally settling on the ground again
In the right wind conditions a plastic bag can not only remain floating for a suprisingly long time, but it can also rise up into the air


E_T

posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 12:26 PM
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"Never underestimate the power of human stupidity."
-Robert Heinlein


This tree was planted Nov 3, 2004.
Looks like it's been there for years.
Check out all of the webs on it.

Spiders can make webs in one night! (even in few hours)



posted on Nov, 17 2004 @ 04:18 PM
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Did anyone else watch the video? From what the guy says they actually have wings... That strikes me as, well, a lil' odd.

The web's on the trees is hardly that exciting.

Edit: Ooh, from one of the links at that website: this site



[edit on 17/11/2004 by Slashpepper]



posted on Nov, 17 2004 @ 04:33 PM
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the weather is right for spiders to have spider love (just how certain conditions cause locus swarms) i live on a lake (lots of spiders near lakes) and when spiderlings hatch they let out a long piece of spider silk the use as a hang glider (spiderlings are very light) and the little guys fly around until they land on a good web making object. This guy is just observing common nature. he must not go outside often.



posted on Nov, 18 2004 @ 03:12 AM
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I live just about on the shore of Lake Erie just south of Buffalo, NY....We have spiders.....but nothing like that!!! I'm sure glad I don't live there!! I HATE spiders!!



posted on Nov, 19 2004 @ 10:12 PM
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Last year about this time one morning I was driving out of town on a country road and witnessed zillions of spider webs along the ditches, telephone poles, attached to nearly ever little bush, weed, etc.! It was incredible. The sunlight was gleaming as the dew was clinging to them and it was like a crystaline world.

Having grown up in the country though, I'm familiar with many mornings finding spiderwebs everywhere. They're more visible in the mornings because of the dew and the way the early morning light shines on them, and because they are freshly spun.

I've always been interested in spiders and used to come home from school and walk around our yard and collect bugs in a jar and toss them into the garden spider webs. They came to recognize me as I approached and would jump out in the middle of their webs, awaiting their snacks!

I haven't heard of any unusual spider phenomena recently but undoubtedly, with the warmer summers and autumns we are having, I think spiders would flourish more as would have a longer period of temporate climate to breed and survive in. After the first frosts of autumn, many spiders move down from trees, etc. closer to the ground and come inside houses.

Your post got me researching about what kinds of spider webs there are, and I'd like to share the following: These are the more common types of webs:

* Orb webs Rounded or spiral webs created between 2 points. Some orb web styles include use of spring traps, cones, ladders, and even sticky trip lines attached to the water's surface.

* Triangle webs -- A three-sided web. The spider waits at one end of the web, and when an insect lands on the web, the the spider shakes the line and tangles the insect so it won't escape.

* Sheet webs Flat mats which usually have a funnel-shaped retreat at one end. The spider hides in the funnel until prey becomes caught in the matting. Sheet web spiders construct a horizontal silk sheet with a dome, from which the spider hangs upside down.

* Cob webs A framework of threads support trap threads attached to a horizontal surface. Prey trip the trap threads and get caught. Cobweb spiders build an irregular silk meshwork with sticky threads at the bottom that trap insects. These spiders put loops in their strands of silk that helps catch their prey.

A Net Thrower is a type of Cobweb Weaver. This spider doesn't wait for insects. It makes a small "net" web and hangs upside down waiting for its prey to get near. Then he drops the net on the insect.

* Funnel webs The spider hides in the funnel and pounces at passing prey, dragging it back into its lair. Funnel webs are flat silk sheets with a raised tube in the corner that serves as the spider's retreat. A Funnel Weaver builds a web in the grass shaped like a tornado funnel. When an insect lands on the outer part (wide part) of the funnel the spider comes up and grabs it.

The Water Spider builds a web like a dome underwater. The spider attaches sheets of silk to plants in the water and then fills the dome with air bubbles. It looks like a small balloon. The spider feeds and raises its family inside the dome.



posted on Nov, 19 2004 @ 10:21 PM
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This phenomina is a regular occurance this time of year as spiderlings "balloon" out to find places to spend the winter.

Like thread on the sun not setting in the right place, this topic is a fairly regular one this time of year.

At least no one has tried to blame "chemtrails" for the spider webs yet.




posted on Nov, 19 2004 @ 10:23 PM
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They came to recognize me as I approached and would jump out in the middle of their webs, awaiting their snacks!


This is simply amazing. Spiders actually posess the cognitive ability to recognize a friendly human?! It makes you wonder how much we don't know about the sencient abilities of the animal/insect world!



posted on Nov, 19 2004 @ 10:25 PM
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I cant get the link to work so Im just going on the picture.


Though it is rare as most spiders are anti-social and even cannibalistic some do live in a huge communal webs .By teaming together, the spiders maintain a good web, and capture large numbers of prey. They even share prey like a pride of lions.

Perhaps the web is a communal web

www.bbc.co.uk...

[edit on 19-11-2004 by ShadowXIX]



posted on Nov, 19 2004 @ 10:37 PM
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Wow! a communal web! Makes one wonder if ants and bees, etc. evolved from solitary creatures to communal entities!

Surely places where chemical contamination is prelevant, the insects must be adversely affected. Photos of webs of spiders on drugs look like this:

www.missblackwidow.com...



posted on Nov, 19 2004 @ 10:43 PM
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I have found that the more time one spends in nature with living things, you develop an affinity with them and a bond is created.

I had a friend who was so in tune with nature, that when he walked through the woods he apologized to the plants when he stepped on them, he felt life was that sacred.

I learned the language of trees spending much time in the woods alone, and plants do have their own language, albeit a silent one, but you must get in touch with them to sense it.



posted on Nov, 20 2004 @ 12:11 AM
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I learned the language of trees spending much time in the woods alone, and plants do have their own language, albeit a silent one, but you must get in touch with them to sense it.


Not tying to be a smart a$$, but what exactly do trees convey when they communicate?



posted on Nov, 20 2004 @ 12:16 AM
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I dont know if this is the same but I have heard when you play music for plants they grow better.



posted on Nov, 20 2004 @ 02:49 AM
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Wow, awoman, you really know your spiders!! I envy you....I don't know why I am so afraid of them, I just am!! It seems they always fall on top of me when I am sitting or leaning, and it freaks me out!! I am definitely a tree hugger myself though!! Did you know that many religions, including Wicca and Druidism tell you you should thank a tree or plant anytime you take something from it? I think trees definitely have their own language...I also remember reading that scientists did a study where they isolated a frequency pitch that a certain plant made at different times. They also had brine shrimp in with the plant. Apparently, they decided to kill the shrimp to see how the plant would react, and it starting emitting a high frequency shriek as if it were screaming....Studies also found that if you play classical or new age music, plants will grow better, but if you play rock or punk music, they grow slower than normal!!


E_T

posted on Nov, 20 2004 @ 03:50 AM
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Originally posted by aWoman
Surely places where chemical contamination is prelevant, the insects must be adversely affected. Photos of webs of spiders on drugs look like this:
www.missblackwidow.com...
Looks like caffeine causes them to make webs which are "little" chaotic.





Originally posted by magickalworld
I'm sure glad I don't live there!! I HATE spiders!!
Then you'll surely like my desktop background.



posted on Nov, 20 2004 @ 08:26 AM
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Strangely enough, what I picked up from trees were emotions. And not just from one tree-- they all emit feelings. When in a woods you can sense the group's feelings, and various interchanges between them.

I'm aware Native Americans say prayers when taking plants, etc. to use.
If you hve any links on the experiments with plants and brine shrimp etc. please post them. I thnk plants are affected by noise and music. It's a wonder anything grows at all in big cities!

Back to spiders, when I worked in Utah in the Canyonlands the tarantulas would crawl across the ground towards you because of your body heat. They were relatively harmless and cool to watch.

What surprises me is that the lowly Daddy Longlegs spider's venom is so toxic! And we used to handle them all the time when we were little and rip their legs off (stuff kids do!)


E_T

posted on Nov, 20 2004 @ 08:44 AM
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These have really interesting webs...


www.xs4all.nl...


www.xs4all.nl...



posted on Nov, 20 2004 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by aWoman


What surprises me is that the lowly Daddy Longlegs spider's venom is so toxic! And we used to handle them all the time when we were little and rip their legs off (stuff kids do!)



Thats what happens when you have toxic venom but fangs to small to pierce human skin. I just hope they dont evovle some bigger fangs that would be scary


E_T I found out why they put those patterens into their webs. I had one like that near my house a orb weaver and looked into it. It turns out that is to make the web visible to larger animals that would destroy the web if they flew into it. Things like birds that the spider cannot hope to eat but could ruin the web. Spider silk is valuable to spiders so they dont want to waste it.

[edit on 20-11-2004 by ShadowXIX]



posted on Nov, 20 2004 @ 06:03 PM
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Daddy Longleg venom isnt toxic and there fangs can penetrate human skin and playing music to plants does make them grow faster. Just watch the Mythbusters people




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