NASA to search for life on Mars

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posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 11:40 PM
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www.cnn.com...

article headline:




Objective of 2020 mission to Mars: Signs of life, NASA says


So, here we finally have an admission from NASA that they are looking for signs of life outside our own planet. Not space exploration, not geological data mining, they want to find signs of life.

This is a bold move.




posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 11:42 PM
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Originally posted by GeisterFahrer
This is a bold move.


Is this sarcasm?
Every single time that NASA sends a craft to Mars, they always speak of the "looking for life" part of it.
Always have.



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 11:51 PM
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Never has NASA, as an organization, ever claimed to be looking for signs of life. A scientist here or there said it would be "cool" or to that effect.

With as many conspiracy theories as there are out there that NASA is covering up actual proof of extraterrestrial intelligence (thanks to Apollo Astronauts that have made this public) for them to openly admit that their sole purpose in 2020 is to search for signs of life is .... big.
edit on 9-7-2013 by GeisterFahrer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 12:01 AM
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Originally posted by GeisterFahrer
Never has NASA, as an organization, ever claimed to be looking for signs of life. A scientist here or there said it would be "cool" or to that effect.


Did NASA really have to say it? What are the main reasons for us to go into space anyway? To master the art of space travel so that one day we can colonize other planets and to look for life elsewhere in the universe.



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by GeisterFahrer
 



"We're still on the quest to answer the grand question: Is there life somewhere else in the universe?" John Grunsfeld, NASA's associate administrator for science, told reporters Tuesday in a teleconference.


The key word in that quote is "still"



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 12:12 AM
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What??!
They are looking for life on Mars NOW!


ETA: the entire point of them searching for things like methane is to look for signs of life...
edit on 10-7-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 12:50 AM
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My guess is they'll find - ultimately - extant life on Mars that's barely surviving in small underground pockets. They'll find vast areas of extinct life organisms. But the catch will be that all of the life on Mars CAME FROM EARTH and adapted to hte martian environment about a billion years ago.

Unfortunately, we'll discover that life cannot adapt to a hostile environment and thrive. This means the best we'll find on Mars are small patches of bacterial or fungal life hanging on.

We'll find nothing in the rest of the solar system except samples of extinct earth organisms that're trapped in meteoroids which were ejected from earth up to a couple billion years ago. We'll see that the odds of survival on a meteorite (or asteroid) are too small for journeys past Mars.

One thing it will do is teach us about ancient earth life and how it spreads to other places.

There'll be debates about how much we can despoil Mars, even though its life is earth-derived. Obviously, people will want to build small colonies, just for kicks. It's an issue. The people moving to Mars will have a big advantage because the life on Mars won't be as complex as on Earth. See, the more hospitable environment on Earth allowed for ever more complex forms of life to evolve.

In a round-about way, Earth life will sprout on Mars, eventually. Humans might terraform or seed it. So even though it got off to a slow start, it'll gain a renewed push in the future...

Of course, maybe what we find out will be far more extreme. Maybe we'll find out that life came from elsewhere. Maybe it originated on Mars (or Venus). In fact, maybe we'll discover that life originated on many different bodies in the early solar system. Maybe we'll find NO life elsewhere.

I'm just trying to weigh the "feelings" I'm getting in my gut.

As for Titan, there's evidence that precursors to life could be existing there. Last I read about it, it was surprising how earth-like it seemed. Not earth-like in a modern way, of course.
edit on 10-7-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 01:45 AM
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They already know there is life out there, they have been preparing humanity for this realisation for years now with the steady stream of information that is being drip fed to us..



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 02:26 AM
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The current rover (Curiosity) is studying the martian environment to help establish past habitability of the planet, and you're surprised that NASA's next step is to look for actual signs of life? If anything, such a mission is long overdue.

But yeah, this is a new milestone in space exploration. This will be the first space mission to specifically look for signs of life. All this conspiracy talk got me thinking, how will NASA and the government react when they find signs of past life? What about signs of present life?



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 08:37 AM
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Originally posted by jonnywhite

Unfortunately, we'll discover that life cannot adapt to a hostile environment and thrive. This means the best we'll find on Mars are small patches of bacterial or fungal life hanging on.


Whats hostile to humans isn't necessarily hostile to other organisms. For example, there is that Antartic Lake - Lake Vostok - that was buried under 2 miles of ice for 15 million years. Scientists thought it would be sterile and when they were able to drill and collect samples they found new organisms that adapted and living under the ice.

One quote from one of the researchers "these organisms may have slowly adapted to the changing conditions in Lake Vostok during the past 15-35 million years as the lake converted from a terrestrial system to a subglacial system.""

While this doesn't do anything to prove if there is or isn't life on Mars or other planets on the solar system, it just goes to say what we currently consider a hostile environment for humans, might not be hostile to other life forms, bacterial or fungal.

www.nbcnews.com...
edit on 7/10/2013 by H34T533K3R because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by GeisterFahrer
Never has NASA, as an organization, ever claimed to be looking for signs of life. A scientist here or there said it would be "cool" or to that effect...


Of course NASA has been looking for signs of life elsewhere and researching the possibility of life elsewhere. They have been doing it for a long time, and it isn't a secret. It is one of their missions..

NASA has an entire branch balled the "NASA Astrobiology Institute" (NAI) whose job it is to research the possibilities of life elsewhere:

NASA Astrobiology Institute


Much of the speculation on the possibility of life in the solar system (in places such as Europa, Titan, Mars, and elsewhere) has come from NASA:

Mapping the Chemistry Needed for Life at Europa

What is Consuming Hydrogen and Acetylene on Titan?


edit on 7/10/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by GeisterFahrer
Never has NASA, as an organization, ever claimed to be looking for signs of life. A scientist here or there said it would be "cool" or to that effect...


Of course NASA has been looking for signs of life elsewhere and researching the possibility of life elsewhere. They have been doing it for a long time, and it isn't a secret. It is one of their missions..

NASA has an entire branch balled the "NASA Astrobiology Institute" (NAI) whose job it is to research the possibilities of life elsewhere:

NASA Astrobiology Institute





Much of the speculation on the possibility of life in the solar system (in places such as Europa, Titan, Mars, and elsewhere) has come from NASA:

Mapping the Chemistry Needed for Life at Europa

What is Consuming Hydrogen and Acetylene on Titan?


edit on 7/10/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



The very first sentence in your posted link states this:



Astrobiology is the study of the origins, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe.


The study of "origins" is abiogenesis. This appears to be more of a philosophical study than an actual mission for the specific purpose of finding alien life on an alien planet. 50 years ago, this was a pipe dream.

That was the point I was making by this being a big deal.
edit on 10-7-2013 by GeisterFahrer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 01:26 AM
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Originally posted by GeisterFahrer
Never has NASA, as an organization, ever claimed to be looking for signs of life. A scientist here or there said it would be "cool" or to that effect.

With as many conspiracy theories as there are out there that NASA is covering up actual proof of extraterrestrial intelligence (thanks to Apollo Astronauts that have made this public) for them to openly admit that their sole purpose in 2020 is to search for signs of life is .... big.
edit on 9-7-2013 by GeisterFahrer because: (no reason given)


In 1976 they had an experiment on the Viking lander that was searching for signs of life. This is public knowledge. So sorry you are as wrong as wrong can be.

Among the objectives of the 2020 rover mission will be the search for signs of life, the collection of samples to possibly be returned to Earth and testing technology that may allow for a manned mission to Mars.

So no, that is not the sole objective. Your conspiracy delusions are making truth hard for you to comprehend.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 06:47 AM
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As Occam indicated the Viking landers included a set of tests that could according to our 'best' ( or at least practical under the circumstances) understanding at the time search for extent life on mars.


Science objectives

Obtain high-resolution images of the Martian surface
Characterize the structure and composition of the atmosphere and surface
Search for evidence of life on Mars

en.wikipedia.org...


At some point in the recent past someone apparently compiled some of the information i have become aware of in the last decade ( much of which one could find in dozens of prior threads on this forum) on a wiki page... A great deal of work went into this and it's certainly a fantastic resource for those who are too lazy to use even a basic resources such as google.

en.wikipedia.org...(planet)

I really recommend it and at worse a large proportion of the posters on this thread will be much less ignorant on the subject matter when the next similarly titled thread comes around.

Thanks,

Stellar
edit on 11-7-2013 by StellarX because: I am somewhat ignorant of grammar and spelling



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 09:50 AM
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The has to be life on Mars or somewhere else. Aliens live like 1,000,000 light years away from us. There's always the Earth ageing and going on to harm the earth by chemicals etc.

I think there's life on mars, but we still have alot of studying to search for life on any planet.

Has anyone seen the "WOW" Video?



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by GeisterFahrer

The very first sentence in your posted link states this:



Astrobiology is the study of the origins, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe.


The study of "origins" is abiogenesis. This appears to be more of a philosophical study than an actual mission for the specific purpose of finding alien life on an alien planet. 50 years ago, this was a pipe dream.

That was the point I was making by this being a big deal.
edit on 10-7-2013 by GeisterFahrer because: (no reason given)


So I guess you really didn't explore the link to NASA's Astrobiology Institute? It really has much more to do with Life Elsewhere than simply "abiogenesis". For example, I have seen articles on there discussing the possibilities of life on Titan that lives on liquid methane (and would thus be very different than any Earth life). Besides, the study of how life formed on Earth could be a huge tool in helping to find how life may have possibly evolved elsewhere.

The point is NASA's Astrobiology Institute is all about the different possibilities of how life may come to be anywhere in the universe -- not just Earth.

I suppose a person could argue that abiogenesis may not be the origins of life on Earth, and that somehow it was spread here from elsewhere (I'm open to the possibility); HOWEVER, even that life would have ultimately needed to start somewhere. So, obviously, abiogenesis is possible.

And as 'occamsrazor" pointed out above, one of the stated missions of the Viking Probes in 1976 was to look for signs of life (signs of biological processes). So this is not really new. I'm old enough to remember when the Voyager probes found signs of a liquid ocean under the ice of Europa in the 1980s, one of the first things the NASA scientists mentioned was about the possibilities of life in those oceans.

The bottom line is that NASA has often been very interested in the idea if life elsewhere in the universe. One of the foremost experts in the field of the study of the possibility of life elsewhere is Dr. Chris McKay (often appearing on "Science Channel" documentaries about the possibilities of alien life) -- and Dr. McKay is one of NASA's lead research scientists.



edit on 7/11/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 09:32 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by GeisterFahrer

The very first sentence in your posted link states this:



Astrobiology is the study of the origins, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe.


The study of "origins" is abiogenesis. This appears to be more of a philosophical study than an actual mission for the specific purpose of finding alien life on an alien planet. 50 years ago, this was a pipe dream.

That was the point I was making by this being a big deal.
edit on 10-7-2013 by GeisterFahrer because: (no reason given)


So I guess you really didn't explore the link to NASA's Astrobiology Institute? It really has much more to do with Life Elsewhere than simply "abiogenesis". For example, I have seen articles on there discussing the possibilities of life on Titan that lives on liquid methane (and would thus be very different than any Earth life). Besides, the study of how life formed on Earth could be a huge tool in helping to find how life may have possibly evolved elsewhere.

The point is NASA's Astrobiology Institute is all about the different possibilities of how life may come to be anywhere in the universe -- not just Earth.

I suppose a person could argue that abiogenesis may not be the origins of life on Earth, and that somehow it was spread here from elsewhere (I'm open to the possibility); HOWEVER, even that life would have ultimately needed to start somewhere. So, obviously, abiogenesis is possible.

And as 'occamsrazor" pointed out above, one of the stated missions of the Viking Probes in 1976 was to look for signs of life (signs of biological processes). So this is not really new. I'm old enough to remember when the Voyager probes found signs of a liquid ocean under the ice of Europa in the 1980s, one of the first things the NASA scientists mentioned was about the possibilities of life in those oceans.

The bottom line is that NASA has often been very interested in the idea if life elsewhere in the universe. One of the foremost experts in the field of the study of the possibility of life elsewhere is Dr. Chris McKay (often appearing on "Science Channel" documentaries about the possibilities of alien life) -- and Dr. McKay is one of NASA's lead research scientists.



edit on 7/11/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)


And that would still be a philosophical debate and discussion. That is far different than planning on an actual space exploration mission with the specific purpose of finding alien life.

Something that has never been done before.
edit on 11-7-2013 by GeisterFahrer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 02:23 AM
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Correction - this mission will look for signs of past life. Apparently, NASA are not yet ready to look for possible signs of existing life. (or the public are not yet ready for the disclosure, mwahahaaaaa!)

Why NASA's Next Mars Rover Won't Seek Current Life: www.space.com...
edit on 12-7-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 08:41 AM
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NASA is already aware there are tiny-sized life-forms on the planet so what other kind of life will it be looking for?

See Phoenix mission - lg_7851 (sol 31) and it's the only one of its kind.

Why would an excavated brown soil sample turn 'rosy red' all of a sudden?



posted on Jul, 13 2013 @ 01:51 AM
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Originally posted by wildespace
Correction - this mission will look for signs of past life. Apparently, NASA are not yet ready to look for possible signs of existing life. (or the public are not yet ready for the disclosure, mwahahaaaaa!)

Why NASA's Next Mars Rover Won't Seek Current Life: www.space.com...
edit on 12-7-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)


Do you have any clue what the conditions on Mars are like? Now why would you think they are looking for present lifeforms under those conditions?





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