Does anyone remember the Stanford Abduction?

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posted on Jul, 13 2013 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by UncleVinnys
 


I don't want to be misunderstood. I believe that there are select events involving mortal extraterrestrials making contact with individuals. Some of us were discussing in this thread how the narrative has been altered by interpretation of the data, wrong data and non-academic investigators. Bud Hopkins was one of the worst when considering scientific principle. There were also others such as Linda Howe and Jacques Vallée.

A couple of us agreed that only the keystone contact events (i.e. Barney Hill, Travis Walton, Pascagoula and perhaps the Allagash mountain incident) were well documented and worthy of further study.

There are just too many so-called experts out there selling books, preaching to the choir. The best way to approach the UFO and abductee enigma, is to study the authors and investigators, and their circle of colleagues. Many revealing facts have been recorded and published about them. Unfortunately, the average person is more interested in stories than substance founded on research. And sadly that's what has fueled the ethos of lore we must now wade through.





edit on 13-7-2013 by g2v12 because: grammer




posted on Jul, 13 2013 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by Latrodectus
 


BTW Latrodectus, I mentioned the Allagash incident, involving two brothers and two friends, as opposed to the "Allegheny", which was my mistake. Case Book has a brief on it.



posted on Jul, 13 2013 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by cklein61
 


I just heard about this case within the last 2 years or so. The women's accounts of what happened surprised me very much! I live very near Stanford and the first time I ever heard mention of it, one of our local news channels was featuring it in a segment they do on mysteries and the unexplained. It wasn't so much that I hadn't heard of it before that surprised me, but the fact that it allegedly happened so close to home! I've seen odd things in the sky on and off all my life here, but I have never known of anyone nearby who claimed to be an abductee. I know the road these women claim to have been traveling on, very well. I like seeing local mysteries pop up on ATS, so S&F to you, OP, for making mention of it!
I do believe I'll read over the case again, just to refresh my memory.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 01:05 AM
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Of the keystones, which one do you favor and why?


I find the Walton Case in Snowflake, AZ pretty compelling. I was familiar with it already because the movie "FIRE IN THE SKY" had officially creeped me out as a child, but on reading the actual case, I think the thing that catches my eye the most about it, is that there is corroborative eye whitness testimony from five different people, all but one of whom passed polygraph tests. I think the other one was an inconclusive result. having had some experience with polygraph tests I can tell you that the best the average guy can hope for is Inconclusive. espescially the older ones. It is extremely difficult if not impossible to Lie to one and expect a No Deception result. the best you can hope for is confusing results. and these days polygraphs are insane. they are monitoring 5 to ten physiological reactions. So the fact that four guys passed polygraph tests suggests to me that its highly likely that these guys at least BELIEVED they say Walton get abducted. Now is it possible that they had some shared hallucination or something of that nature, but then how would you explain waltons A: disappearance, and then B: memories of what happened later?

ALTHOUGH.................I believe waltons' memories of the event were pulled from hypnotic regression.
But to me I like this one the best of the ones Im familiar with offhand.


My least favorite of the "keystone events" would have to be Whitley Streibers accounts of what took place with him in New York state which supposedly inspired him to write Communion and the Transformation. If all he had ever written was communion, I might have found his case to be compelling, but he just kept cranking out unbelievable garbage book after book, where he made himself out to be some sort of messenger chosen by the visitors to an envoy to humankind. after reading his second book in the Communion series I had had enough. His work reads to me like the ravings of a sick deluded person (honestly).
edit on 14-7-2013 by Latrodectus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 07:37 PM
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Originally posted by Latrodectus


Of the keystones, which one do you favor and why?


I find the Walton Case in Snowflake, AZ pretty compelling. I was familiar with it already because the movie "FIRE IN THE SKY" had officially creeped me out as a child, but on reading the actual case, I think the thing that catches my eye the most about it, is that there is corroborative eye whitness testimony from five different people, all but one of whom passed polygraph tests. I think the other one was an inconclusive result. having had some experience with polygraph tests I can tell you that the best the average guy can hope for is Inconclusive. espescially the older ones. It is extremely difficult if not impossible to Lie to one and expect a No Deception result. the best you can hope for is confusing results. and these days polygraphs are insane. they are monitoring 5 to ten physiological reactions. So the fact that four guys passed polygraph tests suggests to me that its highly likely that these guys at least BELIEVED they say Walton get abducted. Now is it possible that they had some shared hallucination or something of that nature, but then how would you explain waltons A: disappearance, and then B: memories of what happened later?

ALTHOUGH.................I believe waltons' memories of the event were pulled from hypnotic regression.
But to me I like this one the best of the ones Im familiar with offhand.


My least favorite of the "keystone events" would have to be Whitley Striebers accounts of what took place with him in New York state which supposedly inspired him to write Communion and the Transformation. If all he had ever written was communion, I might have found his case to be compelling, but he just kept cranking out unbelievable garbage book after book, where he made himself out to be some sort of messenger chosen by the visitors to an envoy to humankind. after reading his second book in the Communion series I had had enough. His work reads to me like the ravings of a sick deluded person (honestly).



Walton's story did receive some accreditation and redemption from skeptics due to the polygraph results. Unfortunately, the movie misrepresented his story, adding in things that never occurred. I've never looked into any research or information published regarding the regression technique or what procedures were followed to ensure that the subject wasn't being led.

The regressions dealt with missing time (two or three days I believe) but Walton had conscious memory of being left on the highway leading to his town. He saw the door close on a metallic, disk shaped craft while it ascended out of sight as he lay on the road side, cold and naked.

Weeks after the incident he was taken to a psychiatrist, who decided to perform the regression due to his paranoid behavior from fragmented memories of the beings and procedures, which made him feel like a mad man.

When Communion was published I saw it on a book stand while waiting in line at a convenience store. The cover, featuring an artist's conception of a Grey's face with those enigmatic black, lifeless eyes, made me feel very uncomfortable. I actually felt a bit of nausea. I bought a copy and while reading it remembered a strange experience I had a few years before. There were things in the book I could relate too as some characteristics of contact, abduction. It triggered the memory of an experience of my own I had pushed to the back of my thoughts. After reading the book though, something in my intellect told me not to trust Strieber, as he had given a full account of the many abductee meetings attended in NYC when he allegedly began to have fragmented recall of his abductions. I always had the gut feeling that he obtained knowledge from the experiences of others for his book, and that he was nothing but a charlatan.










edit on 14-7-2013 by g2v12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 12:05 AM
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I actually never thought about it like that. it would be pretty convenient for Streiber to just insert other peoples stories into his own since he had been attending contactee groups. That's hilarious. What really makes me suspicious of the guy is that he already wrote horror fiction as an occupation before he wrote his best known supposed "non fiction" work. it is just a little too convenient for me that his abduction story is truly frightening.


and I lol'd when you wrote the part about the face on the book creeping you out, because when I was a child my mom had that book and I would put the cover face down if I was in the room alone with it because it used to give me the willies
There is something nasty about that face and you don't have to be a contactee to not like it. Its pretty bad man!



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by Latrodectus
I actually never thought about it like that. it would be pretty convenient for Streiber to just insert other peoples stories into his own since he had been attending contactee groups. That's hilarious. What really makes me suspicious of the guy is that he already wrote horror fiction as an occupation before he wrote his best known supposed "non fiction" work. it is just a little too convenient for me that his abduction story is truly frightening.


and I lol'd when you wrote the part about the face on the book creeping you out, because when I was a child my mom had that book and I would put the cover face down if I was in the room alone with it because it used to give me the willies
There is something nasty about that face and you don't have to be a contactee to not like it. Its pretty bad man!



Yep, its a sinister face that goes right to primal roots. The artist he paid to do the cover earned his worth. The Greys are always sinister, cold - with clandestine multifarious agendas. It's like an ugly tale from the cold war. Strieber's book was laced with it. The funny thing was how he subconsciously sabotaged his lies with truth (regarding the meetings). A dishonest person can never hide his need for redemption.

I would bet that at least 90% of the abductee books are a composite of all of the other stories and assumptions that are out there, plus various themes from popular classics fictions.

They did tell my girlfriend that she had been chosen for an important scientific research project. And as people are easily flattered, that made her feel important. I was semi-conscious, paralyzed on the bed. But my broken recall corroborated that she was talking with someone as she stared at the ship hung outside our bedroom _ I remembered her asking, "who are you?", ...what science project?" Some of the (so-called) investigators claim that its a common theme for abductees to be fed the line that they were chosen for something important, but never told what it is.

I have had some chats with an acquaintance who has become a fairly well known UFO investigator and has written some books. He was a homicide detective, and decided to get into the UFO field full time after struggling with long term memories of abduction by Greys, and the sudden and unexplained death of his nine year old son the day after he was abducted. He says the Greys do what they want, without attempting to convince their subjects to cooperate. He expressed actual hatred for them. He used police terminology when describing how easily these entities could find them, by having studied their movements stealthily. Just as a rapist or serial killer might. He spoke of them as being predatory and information oriented.

I told him about my memories and asked if I should have regression performed to see if there are any latent memories. He advised me against that, noting that he knew someone like me who had to know. Apparently the man did a series of regressions and listened to the tapes. Bringing his abduction experience to the surface created more questions and confusion, ultimately making him miserable. When I heard this, decided to not to have the regression done.

In any case, how would I know if the regressions were actually unlocking real memories or allowing my subliminal mind to narrate some theme to fulfill my own expectation?
edit on 16-7-2013 by g2v12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2013 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by gemineye
reply to post by cklein61
 


I just heard about this case within the last 2 years or so. The women's accounts of what happened surprised me very much! I live very near Stanford and the first time I ever heard mention of it, one of our local news channels was featuring it in a segment they do on mysteries and the unexplained. It wasn't so much that I hadn't heard of it before that surprised me, but the fact that it allegedly happened so close to home! I've seen odd things in the sky on and off all my life here, but I have never known of anyone nearby who claimed to be an abductee. I know the road these women claim to have been traveling on, very well. I like seeing local mysteries pop up on ATS, so S&F to you, OP, for making mention of it!
I do believe I'll read over the case again, just to refresh my memory.


Do u have a link to the story?





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