Does anyone remember the Stanford Abduction?

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posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 02:02 PM
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I have been reading ATS for the last few years and have read all the UFO stories. I have been obsessed with them since I was a child. I remember this story because it happened in Stanford KY, where my Grandparents lived. When this story broke I remember watching the skies looking for spaceships all summer long, it was very exciting. All the years I have be reading ATS I never saw this story mentioned and thought I would share. If there is a previous thread before I am not aware of it. Hope you enjoy. youtu.be...
edit on 9-7-2013 by cklein61 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by cklein61
 


I must admit I haven't heard of this but on face value it looks interesting , I've found this on the 1976 Stanford, Kentucky Abductions that may be of interest , reading it now

Here are some highlights .

The UFO hung over the driver side of the car for a time before it moved ahead of it on the highway. As it did, a bluish-white light shot into the car, lighting up the interior of the vehicle. Later, Mrs. Smith would describe the inside of their car as being filled with "a haze like air, sort of a fog." In a second, all three women suffered from a burning sensation so strong that they could not open their eyes from the irritation. The last thing in the memory of Smith, Stafford, and Thomas was being backed into a pasture entrance in a "crazy manner." The entry was flanked on both sides by an old stone wall. One hour and 20 minutes later, the three found themselves back in the little Chevy, again driving toward Liberty. They were shaken and tense with exposed areas of flesh; painful from the burns.



A detective for the Lexington Police Department, James Young was hired to head the polygraph part of the session. Recognized as an expert in the field, Young began his testing of the three women, all done privately for each of the three. Young was actually a great choice for the sessions, because he was a skeptic as far as UFO stories went. The tests themselves were lengthy, leaving no room for anything but a conclusive result, whether good or bad. After the tests were all completed, Young emerged from the room with an expression of utter amazement. All three of the women had "breezed through" their tests without a hint of deception. To his credit, Young was man enough to admit that his earlier prejudices were completely erased after the testing of the three women. Next would come Dr. Sprinkle's hypnotic session.



In all cases, no matter how believable, it always helps if other witnesses come forward. This case also had other observers of the UFO that night, independent of Stafford, Smith, and Thomas. These sightings occurred in Casey and Lincoln counties, Kentucky.
Within a couple of hundred yards of the abduction, one couple watched from the window of their home a "large, luminous object," which passed over the Stanford area. This occurred about 11:30 P.M. The couple wanted to remain anonymous. Other observers reported also, describing a ring of "reddish orange" lights around a disc-shaped flying object. Two teenagers, out for a joy ride, stated that they chased a low-flying UFO after it had hovered over the Angel Manufacturing Plant in Stanford. They chased the strange object all the way to Danville, and there they reported the object to Police.
Another very significant report came from the owner of the property where the three women's abduction took place. The farmer stated that "down the road" from his house, he witnessed an unusually low-flying object which shot a white beam of light to the ground
.
www.ufocasebook.com...


I find it interesting that others reported Unidentified objects in the area that to me sound very similar to the object the ladies reported seeing .... Interesting case thanks for posting


edit on 9-7-2013 by gortex because: Edit to add



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 03:11 PM
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I would love to hear from other members who remember this and lived in the area at the time.



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 



The farmer stated that "down the road" from his house, he witnessed an unusually low-flying object which shot a white beam of light to the ground.

Thats interesting. Halt (Rendlesham case) said that the craft he and his airforce buddies saw sent down a beam of white light.

OP's vid.
edit on 9-7-2013 by VoidHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 03:47 AM
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Here's a mention of the case in the book Real Aliens, Space Beings, and Creatures from Other Worlds by Brad Steiger, Sherry Hansen Steiger.
books.google.co.uk...,+James+Young&source=bl&ots=v5OM9bhFxX&sig=bqyPz JQGOmsA-BT_H3lCgTc3ocA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=5RzdUZ_6LMq20QXU0YDoBg&ved=0CIgBEOgBMAg4Cg#v=onepage&q=Lexington%20Police%20Department%2C%20James%20Young&f=false



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by cklein61
 


Thanks for this thread. Fascinating account by three honest women, who simply wish to understand the purpose of their experience. The Barney and Betty Hill case is extremely intriguing with many parallels. There was also an Australian case, with multiple witnesses and abductees in three vehicles.

These type of cases are clearly not imagined or illusionary, but physical in nature. I would love the opportunity to interview someone who can relate such vivid details.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 06:03 AM
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Thanks, it was my first thread on here.
edit on 11-7-2013 by cklein61 because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-7-2013 by cklein61 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by cklein61
 


I don't live near the area and I've never heard of it before but it is quite interesting. Thanks for sharing



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by cklein61
Thanks, it was my first thread on here.
edit on 11-7-2013 by cklein61 because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-7-2013 by cklein61 because: (no reason given)


Have you read any particular author or are you influenced by a specific ideas?



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 07:48 PM
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Would love to hear Druscilla's take on this from a psychological perspective.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 09:27 PM
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In most cases I am rather leery of abductee reports with the exception of a few like Travis Waltons and these ladies and a few other worth mention. I just run into so few plausible accounts from people who I would consider trust worthy individuals, but every now and then you run across one of these with witness corroboration that are very hard to discount. I myself am not a fan of hypnotic regression "therapy" and consider most aspects of psychology subjective and "scientifically soft" but having had some experience with polygraph examinations I have a much better feeling toward them. So I consider polygraph testimony (especially newer testimony and testing because of advancements in that field and associated technologies) a valid form of testing especially when multiple polygraphs have been performed. Id never heard of this story before now. its really interesting and warrants in my mind, a little more investigation. thanks for the post!



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 09:40 PM
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Originally posted by Latrodectus
In most cases I am rather leery of abductee reports with the exception of a few like Travis Waltons and these ladies and a few other worth mention. I just run into so few plausible accounts from people who I would consider trust worthy individuals, but every now and then you run across one of these with witness corroboration that are very hard to discount. I myself am not a fan of hypnotic regression "therapy" and consider most aspects of psychology subjective and "scientifically soft" but having had some experience with polygraph examinations I have a much better feeling toward them. So I consider polygraph testimony (especially newer testimony and testing because of advancements in that field and associated technologies) a valid form of testing especially when multiple polygraphs have been performed. Id never heard of this story before now. its really interesting and warrants in my mind, a little more investigation. thanks for the post!



The Travis Walton story along with Betty Hill and the Pascagoula abductions are my favorites, with perhaps a couple others. I wonder how many others like them are out there never to be heard of.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by g2v12
 


Ya man I don't know the answer to that but im sure there are a lot. But personally ive seen very little convincing evidence that the abduction model is what it seems to be at face value, and not caused by some internal physiological or psychological issues, but its these keystone cases that really give me pause and make me wonder about the phenomenon. Just when I think I have it figured out...........................



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 10:37 PM
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Originally posted by Latrodectus
reply to post by g2v12
 


Ya man I don't know the answer to that but im sure there are a lot. But personally ive seen very little convincing evidence that the abduction model is what it seems to be at face value, and not caused by some internal physiological or psychological issues, but its these keystone cases that really give me pause and make me wonder about the phenomenon. Just when I think I have it figured out...........................



Right. Multiple witnesses, corroboration and other elements that call for deeper analysis. I've read everything I could get my hands on since the mid sixties. I also have a memory of some type of contact experience from the 70s, of which I recognize elements of mind control. The half dozen or so classic cases produce life long effects on the recipients. The Allegheny event is one of the most intriguing of all, which involved two or three brothers and a friend. It took years for the brothers to talk about their subliminal memories, which were manifest in their dreams - without the slightest knowledge of the others' experiences.

I have come to believe that the data we have of the abductee's perceptions of (what might very well be physical and psychological) contact has been falsely interpreted as being a purely psycho-spiritual phenomenon, as even John Edward Mack M.D. may have faltered by the nature of his work. And we find this tendency to portray such events through a one or two dimensional perspective by the scientists Jacques Fabrice Vallée and his mentor Dr Allen Hynek.

I just feel it is too much of a stretch for people (even scientists) to imagine non-humans with instruments that can utilize ubiquitous elements to the effect of literally controlling the brains of human subjects in such a profound manner. Nevertheless, one might consider the symmetry of the brain and what basic natural forces could be employed to effect or control it. Especially when considering that Alpha waves are neural oscillations in the frequency range of 8–12 Hz.

It may be so simple and startling a revelation, that even the most educated among us would find this impossible to imagine or accept.



edit on 11-7-2013 by g2v12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 12:38 AM
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I'm unfamiliar with the alegheny event. Ill have to do some research on that one. as far as shared dreams and psychological issues are concerned, it compelling as far as a story goes but I cant take it too seriously as far as evidence is concerned (personally) because that type of data is really sort of intangible and I need some "material" to chew on. I am reminded of a lecture by Terrence McKenna where he was talking about sessions with orally active '___' (ayahuasca) where participants would regularly share hallucinations and talk about the colors and textures of a certain moment in their visions. Stuff like that just shows me that theres so little we know about our psychology and the possibilities we possess that things like shared visions don't seem to be that uncommon in certain circumstances and shouldn't be trusted as legit data, even if you absolutely 100 percent believe the person telling you the story. Its interesting, but Ill need a little more. I remember Bud Hopkins got himself into a little hot water when people started to show that people could "remember" abductions through suggestion under hypnosis even though no such things had ever occurred.



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 10:38 PM
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Originally posted by Latrodectus
I'm unfamiliar with the alegheny event. Ill have to do some research on that one. as far as shared dreams and psychological issues are concerned, it compelling as far as a story goes but I cant take it too seriously as far as evidence is concerned (personally) because that type of data is really sort of intangible and I need some "material" to chew on. I am reminded of a lecture by Terrence McKenna where he was talking about sessions with orally active '___' (ayahuasca) where participants would regularly share hallucinations and talk about the colors and textures of a certain moment in their visions. Stuff like that just shows me that theres so little we know about our psychology and the possibilities we possess that things like shared visions don't seem to be that uncommon in certain circumstances and shouldn't be trusted as legit data, even if you absolutely 100 percent believe the person telling you the story. Its interesting, but Ill need a little more. I remember Bud Hopkins got himself into a little hot water when people started to show that people could "remember" abductions through suggestion under hypnosis even though no such things had ever occurred.



You know, I was fascinated with Hopkins as an amateur so converted that he was unconsciously preaching to the choir. He was also aggressive in documenting a particular category of abductions with witnesses in places like New York City, within a narrow set of parameters. I think that was a good idea initially, but in his zeal didn't filter the methodology in performing regressions, as you alluded.

On the other hand a more interesting story from this perspective was the work of a leading psychiatrist, Dr. Benjamin Simon of Boston, who regressed Betty and Barney Hill (early 60s). Simon was a fundamentalist who thought of UFOs and alien encounters as hogwash or pure fantasy. The Hills were initially referred to Simon by another doctor when they expressed concerns about his lack of experience in regressive hypnosis. I've seen transcripts of the tapes and was impressed with Dr. Simon's support during the sessions, without leading the subjects. Of course what I saw was a very small part of the many hours recorded. He regressed both, but his main interest was helping Barney due to his stressed condition and poor health - ulcers, high blood pressure and alcohol consumption. He passed away several years later at a young age.

One aspect of the alleged abduction of the Hills, was that it was the first ever investigated and published. The couple remembered seeing a UFO on their trip home through the new england countryside and began having lucid dreams within a few days thereafter. The dreams were very frightening and apparently corroborating when they were discussed. How much influence Barney and Betty's discussions had on their psyches is perhaps a matter of premise, depending on whether there was an actual experience associated.

The Hill case is a good study because it was singularly unique for the time and marked the beginning of the advanced mythos and chaos we see today with allot of acting out, and a pathology of its own in some respects. John Edward Mack M.D. (October 4, 1929 – September 27, 2004) did hundreds of regressions and wrote a book. He originally attempted to define a new psychological disorder in his research, but found the subjects so indelibly impressed with what they expressed as terrifyingly visceral experiences, he concluded there was something more happening than delusion, which could not be classified within the standards of psychiatry. His research and methods were so impeccable that his colleagues were unable to have him excised from the Harvard teaching staff. If I understood him, he viewed the alleged abductee experiences as psycho-spiritual visions rather than physical encounters.

If you are interested in a personal fundamental study, these are some of the worthy candidates. There are too many amateurs who have made a name for themselves by writing books and speaking at UFO conventions, with virtually no education or practical experience in the right fields. The work of Mack and Vallée (with assistance from Hynek) are correlated as non-physical phenomenon, which has unfortunately turned toward the paranormal and religious fundamentalism.

The example in your post regarding the use of (D.M.T) is based on a common experience in which the group knowingly participates in the experiment. Being such inherently, how would you approach individuals whose memories tell them that they've been forced against their will to participate in humiliating scientific procedures involving their reproductive organs?


edit on 12-7-2013 by g2v12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 11:48 PM
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Truthfully, Im uncertain how I would answer that question. I certainly wouldn't call them liars, but I would have to take everything they told me even under hypnosis with a grain of salt due to the abundance of stories out there from people whom I would categorize as highly suspicious. Now I don't completely discount that a physical phenomenon is occurring, but those real, hard to refute, corroborated stories are few and far between.

I am familiar with Mack, and respect both his research and his credentials. Hyneck however is another story completely. I take almost everything he says with a grain of salt because of his wildly differing positions throughout his career. And yes, the Hill's story is remarkable and probably one of the best cases we have out there to look back on. But they were keystone! people like Hopkins took that scenario and ran the phenomenon into the ground. Hopkins and people like him, (in my mind) are the Ken Keseys of the UFO world. I feel they've done more damage than good. That's why with the acception of a few cases I really try to ignore the abduction phenomenon (even though I believe there is something there) and look to UFO sightings more often instead.



posted on Jul, 13 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by Latrodectus
Truthfully, Im uncertain how I would answer that question. I certainly wouldn't call them liars, but I would have to take everything they told me even under hypnosis with a grain of salt due to the abundance of stories out there from people whom I would categorize as highly suspicious. Now I don't completely discount that a physical phenomenon is occurring, but those real, hard to refute, corroborated stories are few and far between.

I am familiar with Mack, and respect both his research and his credentials. Hyneck however is another story completely. I take almost everything he says with a grain of salt because of his wildly differing positions throughout his career. And yes, the Hill's story is remarkable and probably one of the best cases we have out there to look back on. But they were keystone! people like Hopkins took that scenario and ran the phenomenon into the ground. Hopkins and people like him, (in my mind) are the Ken Keseys of the UFO world. I feel they've done more damage than good. That's why with the acception of a few cases I really try to ignore the abduction phenomenon (even though I believe there is something there) and look to UFO sightings more often instead.



I am on the same page with you in all the above. I never thought much of Hopkin's correlations, due to my perception of his over zealous nature and lack of education in science and what appeared to be a lack of filtering the data with some preconditions.

I read Vallée, but found the Hynek/Vallée theorem drawn from a narrow class of high strangeness data, much of which was adapted from events that seemed out of context in terms of EDH and ETH. This is in addition to the fact that the results were reminiscent or scientifically infused interpretations of ancient paranormal belief systems (including religion). His books attempted to circumvent this disparagement with the premise that such beliefs were the result of an unknown entity that morphed as aliens, demons, angels and leprechauns. Which is elemental in the Abrahamic religions. Nothing new there.

As for the Hill study and the few other keystones, the regressions came as the result of lucid conscious memory and/or dreams, which being so unusual in nature, acted as a sort of device for further investigation. That's of significant interest even as an intangible. Sometimes, by expecting everything we research to have whatever it is one would accept as tangible, we erect walls to further research. And of course, this also has the reciprocal effect of allowing amateurs to run them into the ground.

Of the keystones, which one do you favor and why?
edit on 13-7-2013 by g2v12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by g2v12
 



BTW, www.tricksterbook.com... here's a well researched paper on the Hopkin's book about the NYC abduction. Near the end is an amazing correlation.



posted on Jul, 13 2013 @ 07:22 PM
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Originally posted by g2v12

Originally posted by Latrodectus
reply to post by g2v12
 


Ya man I don't know the answer to that but im sure there are a lot. But personally ive seen very little convincing evidence that the abduction model is what it seems to be at face value, and not caused by some internal physiological or psychological issues, but its these keystone cases that really give me pause and make me wonder about the phenomenon. Just when I think I have it figured out...........................




I have come to believe that the data we have of the abductee's perceptions of (what might very well be physical and psychological) contact has been falsely interpreted as being a purely psycho-spiritual phenomenon, as even John Edward Mack M.D. may have faltered by the nature of his work. And we find this tendency to portray such events through a one or two dimensional perspective by the scientists Jacques Fabrice Vallée and his mentor Dr Allen Hynek.

I just feel it is too much of a stretch for people (even scientists) to imagine non-humans with instruments that can utilize ubiquitous elements to the effect of literally controlling the brains of human subjects in such a profound manner. Nevertheless, one might consider the symmetry of the brain and what basic natural forces could be employed to effect or control it. Especially when considering that Alpha waves are neural oscillations in the frequency range of 8–12 Hz.

It may be so simple and startling a revelation, that even the most educated among us would find this impossible to imagine or accept.



edit on 11-7-2013 by g2v12 because: (no reason given)


Interesting.

Yeah, I think John Mack may have been ON to something. Even if it is call psychological, it still has a vast and long-lasting effect, much like near-death experience.
How do you separate out the idea that man can, with his mind, produce a physical change, and the idea that "aliens" can do the same. The point is if mind can change things, then reality is not what we thought.

Meanwhile, a quote from David Jacob - just wondering if abductions are a generational thing that would argue against a purely "all in your mind" hypothesis.

“Science, UFOs and the Search for ET Hybrids”
Since the Antonio Vilas Boas case in 1957, the abduction phenomenon has consistently presented itself as being reproductively oriented. In the early 1980s Budd Hopkins coined the word “hybrids” to designate the offspring of those reproductive activities. He also discovered that the abduction phenomenon was intergenerational. Therefore, the children of abductees will in turn be abductees themselves and so on through the generations. My research has confirmed this. I have recently formulated a theory about hybridization that might reconcile the differences in personnel involved with abductions with the intergenerational features of the phenomenon. The theory is based on examination of hundreds of accounts that I have received over the past twenty-seven years. The new theory suggests that the hybridization program is more important and extensive than has been known and that it has a direct bearing on the intergenerational aspects of abductions and our future.
Dr. David Jacobs, PhD.





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