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Asiana crash photo anomaly

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posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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I'll make this short and to the point...
The first image shows the airplane as seen from above.
Notice how the interior is black and chard.



Then how is it possible that in this picture, nothing looks damaged, much less burned?



Note: Using Google image search, both images cannot be found preceding Saturday.




posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:36 PM
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The back of the plane?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:38 PM
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In your first photo only half of the fuselage is visible.
Is there a wider shot available that shows the full plane for comparison?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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Good catch and question. The paper thin oxygen circulation bags for the masks don't show heat damage and the interior seems to show no smoke fire damage/smudging.

Different planes where someone used a file photo on #2? Anyone have a pre-fire shot of this plane or one like it to see interior colors and config?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:43 PM
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As already said......interior shot is from the rear of the plane




posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:44 PM
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whats the timing of the photos?
was one taken by someone leaving the plane ?
or are you trying to start this was a false flag op since it's been awhile since we had one of those.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:44 PM
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I think what has happened is that the craft landed, people were evacuated safely and then the plane caught alight.

That pretty much aligns with the story given ton us.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:44 PM
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Photos show that the rear section is in much better condition. A very good chance those seats were in the rear area of the plane.

edit:

Look at all the light toward the rear of the picture. Might be the door and toward the tail.
edit on 7/8/2013 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by Argyll
 


There still would be visible heat damage- look at how intense the heat must have been to do that to the craft!

I believe the plane landed then it caught fire- otherwise I'm pretty sure there would be more casualties!



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by samuel1990
 





There still would be visible heat damage- look at how intense the heat must have been to do that to the craft!


I think it's obvious that people were evacuated before the plane caught fire....stands to reason that the interior shot was taken before the fire started............. possibly by an evacuating passenger?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:55 PM
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I don't even think that the picture need be taken beforehand, I mean the plane is completely empty in the picture. It's more like a picture of the rear, and there does seem to be more damage on the right hand side rear from other pictures, hence the daylight as well.

I now see that the picture is likely off an NTSB video. Looking at it, you can safely say there is not much plane left below the seats. The daylight is not that significant. Link,

www.nbcwashington.com...
edit on 8-7-2013 by smurfy because: Link.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:59 PM
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I have a feeling that it was reported that one of the engines, which you can not see in the overhead photo, came adrift and lies alongside the fuselage, and that is what caused the fire. igniting leaking fuel, hydraulics etc.

The overhead was the first photo I saw, and I could not believe many could have escaped or how that could have occurred. Seems incredible.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:00 PM
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Is it just me or do planes seem flimsy as hell?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by samuel1990
I think what has happened is that the craft landed, people were evacuated safely and then the plane caught alight.

That pretty much aligns with the story given ton us.


This has been my thinking as well, that everyone got out before the fire spread to the fuselage.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:02 PM
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The fire didn't burn through the entire cabin. It started forward of the wings, after the firefighters were already on scene. They were able to control it fairly quickly. They had enough time to throw knives up to people on the plane, so they could cut seatbelts and free trapped passengers before the fire started. They were in the process of dousing the fuselage with foam as well as they were freeing passengers.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by Signals
 


They're anything but. Aviation aluminum has a stronger tensile strength than a lot of steels used in building. It has to be thin enough to be light, but strong enough to be able to flex, both from pressurization, and from flying through storms and turbulence.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:15 PM
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I believe the top photo is after and the bottom photo is before.

I'm guessing engine failure, hard landing, people are evaluating while the plane is burning rapidly.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:21 PM
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I'm guessing engine failure


NTSB stated engine failure is probably not an issue.

From NTSB


The throttles were advanced a few seconds prior to impact and the engines appear to respond normally.
edit on 7/8/2013 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by sylent6
 


It's pointing towards pilot error. New pilot to the 777 (lots of experience in other aircraft), new instructor pilot (lots of experience in the 777), came in too steep, and tried to abort the landing too late.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:30 PM
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I'm not buying that. Even if he was inexperience, he manage and somehow to land the aircraft with minimum casualties.

Something happen to that plane right before it landed and maybe the plane is faulty. Is there any prior mechanical problems or some recalls with that particular model plane?

Anyone knows of any passengers making any statements on what they seaward?
edit on 8-7-2013 by sylent6 because: (no reason given)





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