Supreme Court asked to stop NSA telephone surveillance

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posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:17 PM
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Well, I am not a lawyer nor do I play one on message boards but this lawsuit may have merit because the way the the laws are set up respecting the FISA courts only the USSC can make rulings.

Here we go. THis is big. This is where the rubber meets the road. We will finally know where we stand in this once great land of ours.


Washington (CNN) -- The U.S. Supreme Court is being asked to stop the National Security Agency's surveillance of domestic telephone communications data.
In an emergency appeal filed Monday, a privacy rights group claimed a secret federal court improperly authorized the government to collect the electronic records, and said only the justices could resolve the statutory issues at stake.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center filed its petition directly with the high court, bypassing the usual step of going to the lower federal courts first.
Such a move makes it much harder for the justices to intervene now, but the privacy group argues "exceptional ramifications" demand judicial review now.


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I do know the court is almost ready for Summer recess, I hope we don't have to wait until September.
edit on 8-7-2013 by GrantedBail because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by GrantedBail
 


I don't see them bypassing lower courts as an issue since this deals directly with Constitutional rights, which is the reason for the US Supreme Court.

If the courts wont correct this then the people of the US must by voting.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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The NSA has been using telephones to spy on Americans for 60 years the duration of the cold war before that they were using telephones to spy since Bell invented them.

So why are they going to stop now?
Just because the SCOTUS says 'pretty please'.

Not likely.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:53 PM
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So let's say that the Supreme Court declares this surveillance is illegal. If it continues in secret, and there just so happens to be another whistle blower-then WHAT could the SCOTUS do to enforce the law since all of these things are done in secret?

Will things change so that the SCOTUS doesn't have the right to rule on SECRET affairs? This could be a slippery slope...



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


J. Edgar Hoover agrees.
(wherever hes at)




posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by sonnny1
reply to post by neo96
 


J. Edgar Hoover agrees.
(wherever hes at)



The SCOTUS lacks credibility especially after approving the care act that has that 'data hub' that is linked to the IRS and the DOD.

LOL Geez.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by GrantedBail
 


This video speaks for itself
edit on 8-7-2013 by Nephalim because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-7-2013 by Nephalim because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:12 PM
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If nobody has brought this issue of spying as unconstitutional before it will stand now, the reason is that the patriot act has been abused and the government has done nothing to fix the abuses, so now is the Supreme court time to put out the guidelines of what is constitutional or not about spying by private contractors in the NSA under the patriot act.

This issue will be taken by the supreme court.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:16 PM
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reply to post by GrantedBail
 


waste of time and money
if the peeping toms running prism et al
can simply pull up the judges files
and blackmail them into submission

the only way to deal with these peeping toms

is by poking their "eyes" out.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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New second video interview with Snowden

www.guardian.co.uk...



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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Originally posted by GrantedBail
I do know the court is almost ready for Summer recess, I hope we don't have to wait until September.


reply to post by GrantedBail
 


The way things are escalating there probably wont be a September.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by GrantedBail
 


I think it's cute and all that EPIC thinks this is going to settle matters; cuter still that they actually think it's going to be resolved in our favor.

But this entire issue, as much as boils me, completely justifies my cynicism of the past few years. The Government is our enemy. The Supreme Court is part of the Government. Ipso facto, the Supreme Court is our enemy.

Oh, sure, there are a few mewling minority opinions here and there; but all-in-all, whether it's that the Supremes are just as vulnerable to blackmail as everyone else, or that they've simply turned their backs on us, they are NOT our recourse to oppression. That's on us--one way or the other....



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
The NSA has been using telephones to spy on Americans for 60 years the duration of the cold war before that they were using telephones to spy since Bell invented them.

So why are they going to stop now?
Just because the SCOTUS says 'pretty please'.

Not likely.


I have to agree with neo96.
The "secret" agencies within the administration will continue to spy on us just in a more clandestine way..
Sad but true



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043
If nobody has brought this issue of spying as unconstitutional before it will stand now, the reason is that the patriot act has been abused and the government has done nothing to fix the abuses


TPA hasn't been abused. It has done exactly what it's creators intended for it to do. It's very existence is abusive. Those who have convinced people that this is merely a perversion of the law's true intent are no doubt laughing their butts off right now.





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