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Ireland says no to arrest warrant for Edward Snowden

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posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 03:43 PM
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I am pleased to say that the Republic of Ireland has denied the US an arrest warrant for Edward Snowden if he lands in the country. Apparently the American government are concerned that Snowden may pass through Shannon airport here on his way to south America.




Judge Colm Mac Eochaidh refused the request for an arrest warrant on the grounds that no information had been given by the US authorities about where the alleged offences took place. The ruling also stated that the decision was taken because the US failed to show where the theft of government property took place or what had been stolen. Judge Mac Eochaidh said offences may relate to theft of information and its misuse rather than to physical property but that assumptions could not be made that it took place in Hawaii.


Of course there is nothing to prevent the US from making a second application for an arrest warrant.

Ireland was one of the countries Snowden applied for asylum in but said 'A request for asylum in the Irish Republic can only be considered if Snowden makes an application on arrival in the country'.

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posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 04:47 PM
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Ireland



Though its dangrously close to the unofficial "51" state of America the UK.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:12 PM
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Its good to see that Ireland has the back bone to stand up to the US, I have been sick and tired of all those countries out there that don't want anything to do with that guy, I look at this guy as a whistle blower and for all of his trouble he is not even protected under the Whistle blower laws.

Hats of too you Ireland.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:27 PM
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Originally posted by crazyewok
Ireland



Though its dangrously close to the unofficial "51" state of America the UK.


The north of Ireland is actually classed as British.

Great news, I'm assuming it doesn't apply to the north, as I don't recall hearing that Britain had granted him any kind of asylum, or that if he even applied here.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by JeffersonAirplane
 


I know Im from Britain.

Yes it means Irleand not UK Ireland.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by crazyewok
 


Thanks
I'm so glad to hear of more and more countries backing him, or at least some of them trying to.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:40 PM
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I was recently in Belfast and Dublin.....love em both.
Wish people would stop saying how much they love Ireland...too many people find out about it they will ruin it.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by JeffersonAirplane
 


yep, Northern Ireland is classed as being part of the UK although some folks would disagree.

You are entitled to either a British or Irish passport if you are born in the north. Plus, we are kind of self governing up here now, although not as much as we would like ( give us time ).



Since the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, Northern Ireland is largely self-governing. According to the agreement, Northern Ireland co-operates with the rest of Ireland on some policy areas, while other areas are reserved for the Government of the United Kingdom, though the Republic of Ireland "may put forward views and proposals" with "determined efforts to resolve disagreements between [the two governments]"



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by Res Ipsa
 


I see you are from Florida, Ive been there on holiday a couple of times and loved the place!

Wanna swap?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:53 PM
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Originally posted by Lady_Tuatha
reply to post by JeffersonAirplane
 


yep, Northern Ireland is classed as being part of the UK although some folks would disagree.

You are entitled to either a British or Irish passport if you are born in the north. Plus, we are kind of self governing up here now, although not as much as we would like ( give us time ).



Since the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, Northern Ireland is largely self-governing. According to the agreement, Northern Ireland co-operates with the rest of Ireland on some policy areas, while other areas are reserved for the Government of the United Kingdom, though the Republic of Ireland "may put forward views and proposals" with "determined efforts to resolve disagreements between [the two governments]"




Very interesting, I had no idea that the north of Ireland followed some of the same policies as the south.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:00 PM
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reply to post by Lady_Tuatha
 


This reminds me of France denying the US use of its airspace when we bombed Libya back in the 80's. France thought they were more important than they actually were.

Worst case scenario we can just appeal Irelands decision to the EU courts.
edit on 8-7-2013 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:04 PM
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Originally posted by Xcathdra
reply to post by Lady_Tuatha
 


This reminds me of France denying the US use of its airspace when we bombed Libya back in the 80's. France thought they were more important than they actually were.

Worst case scenario we can just appeal Irelands decision to the EU courts.
edit on 8-7-2013 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)


It was frances airspace to do with what they will. The usa does not own the world.

Its that arrogance that makes super powers fall....



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by crazyewok
It was frances airspace to do with what they will. The usa does not own the world.

The US never asked to use their airspace...



Originally posted by crazyewok
Its that arrogance that makes super powers fall....

and its that type of ignorance that does the same..

As for Irelands decision.... its their decision.

I just don't want to hear them bitch when the favor is returned in the future.
edit on 8-7-2013 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


If they had not said no then the usa could have crossed it from its bases in the uk.

The usa has a habbit of doing things before checking.



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 01:34 AM
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Originally posted by crazyewok
reply to post by Xcathdra
 


If they had not said no then the usa could have crossed it from its bases in the uk.

The usa has a habbit of doing things before checking.


Yet they didnt need the use of France's airspace...

Just like Ireland doesnt need permission to violate a treaty as well as EU gtreaties simply because they dont like US Domestic law.

Oh... wait... theybhave nothing to do with US Domestic law. Hmmm.. now who is presuming something they dont have a right to presume?



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


Oh really.. and what treaties are they violating according to you?



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 09:28 AM
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America does not recognise the European court of human rights/justice, so one might as well forget Europe as regards so called 'human rights'.



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 09:29 AM
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Originally posted by Xcathdra

Originally posted by crazyewok
reply to post by Xcathdra
 


If they had not said no then the usa could have crossed it from its bases in the uk.

The usa has a habbit of doing things before checking.


Yet they didnt need the use of France's airspace...

Just like Ireland doesnt need permission to violate a treaty as well as EU gtreaties simply because they dont like US Domestic law.

Oh... wait... theybhave nothing to do with US Domestic law. Hmmm.. now who is presuming something they dont have a right to presume?


What are you on about? America did not provide the evidence as to when and where these offences took place, that is why the arrest warrant was denied, nothing to do with treaties, if they were honest about what is happening they might have got it but they weren't. Ireland is not America, here we need proof of wrong doing, we aren't just going to hand out arrest warrants because your corrupt government said so.



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


If there is one thing we can always count on, it's Xcathdra to enter a thread and peddle the government line and defend them to the hilt. If they said jump you'd ask how high.

Carry on...

Good on Ireland I say.



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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Originally posted by Xcathdra
reply to post by Lady_Tuatha
 


This reminds me of France denying the US use of its airspace when we bombed Libya back in the 80's. France thought they were more important than they actually were.

Worst case scenario we can just appeal Irelands decision to the EU courts.
edit on 8-7-2013 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)


Well all the US has to do is to appeal for the warrant with the information that the irish judge deems necessary ( if they have it ) I would hope most countries wouldnt blindly take other governments words for it when asking them to take such measures, its only right that evidence should be supplied.






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