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Bug Out Bag 101- A Different Perspective

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posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:09 AM
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Building a bug out bag shouldn't start with someone else list. It should start by learning how to properly build a bag so it contains the essentials YOU need. This introduction to the bug out bag covers the basic method to consider the essential gear you need in your pack.





posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by LibertysTeeth
 


My BoB is specifically tailored to the terrain and weather conditions that I know I will be traveling through. (Northern climates). That means being prepared for pretty much any seasonal or weather related event. What little food I have is of the long lasting variety in the case its lacking at any point.

Plenty of edible plants, Venison, fish and fowl (plus Dogs and Cats if need be). Water can be procured through a variety of means.

My Bob also gets modified and restocked every time I go camping, which I do in all seasons. It's actually gotten smaller from its orginal configuation.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 09:53 AM
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Having lived in Alaska until 2001 and living in Arizona since, I can tell you that with the exception of some common items (fire starter, water container, food, ect) the remaining contents of my BoB between the two locations are completely different. Location and climate also including threats and animals couldn't be more different between the two and BoB contents should and do reflect that.

Where ever you may be and what climate will dictate what you'll need to survive in the short term and long term.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 09:53 AM
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Good point about being individualized.

Part of this for me is that I will have to go almost 50 miles to get home if a SHTF event happens while I'm at work. So, a light BOB with an emphasis on small, light, and multi-use items is key for me. Also, my climate is pretty forgiving in all seasons, so other than rain, shelter isn't a big concern.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:12 AM
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I'm glad to see that you actually use your gear. That will be a point I make in another video. It is one thing to have the gear, it is another to put in some real world practical use.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:24 AM
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Yep, and you inevitably get out there and go....damn...wish I had THIS with me (insert some item left out of your BOB planning). By using it, you find out these things BEFORE you ever have to actually rely on it in a SHTF scenario.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:29 AM
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reply to post by LibertysTeeth
 


One more thing and thanks for reminding me. I need a solar panel to charge batteries. I also have a Motorola just in case the cell phone towers are knocked.

I speaking of batteries, I just realized that I need to change mine.

Dude! You're costing me money!



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:29 AM
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Not only that, but actually learning how to use some gear. Could you imagine setting up a tent under stress in the dark for the first time or something like that?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by LibertysTeeth
 


That's why I like dome tents. They are so darn easy to set up. (and quick too, so if you have to put it up real quick when a storm happens....)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 



I need a solar panel to charge batteries.


I'd really hope I could get home within 3-4 days, so I can't see the need for that. My radio/flashlight is handcrank also, and I refresh the batteries every 4 months (along with the water) for anything in the pack that uses them. The radio/flashlight can even charge the cell phone, with some cranking.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:42 AM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I should have specified walkie talkie. I too have a Grundig FR200 that works great.

But I'm thinking that if I was in an area that was struck by a natural calamity; ie, tornado, flood, etc., then there will be people monitering the freqs.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by LibertysTeeth
 


Since you have the site, can you address the issue of dress for a prolonged SHTF scenario? I mention this because at the beginning of the video, we see a guy with a bright blue bag wearing camo which negates the camo.


With the exception of my hunting clothes, I have gotten rid of all my uniforms and replaced them with earth-tone colored clothing. People hopefully won't see me as a resource or threat that way. I am looking for a duster with removable liner. That way it would be easier to carry concealed as well.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 11:12 AM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
reply to post by TDawgRex
 



I need a solar panel to charge batteries.


I'd really hope I could get home within 3-4 days, so I can't see the need for that. My radio/flashlight is handcrank also, and I refresh the batteries every 4 months (along with the water) for anything in the pack that uses them. The radio/flashlight can even charge the cell phone, with some cranking.


The Goal Zero is nice as you can just strap it to the back or your pack and charge things without thinking about them. The smaller one (like I have) only does USB, so you can only charge items that are charged via USB. The larger version will charge AA's.

Curious, how much cranking would it take to charge a cell phone?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by LibertysTeeth
 


I find I get about a minute of use per minute of cranking. If the phone is completely dead, add about 2 minutes of cranking. (doesn't seem like a lot, but when that is ALL your doing, seems like an eternity). Still, it's for an EMERGENCY...so... (I also have a Motorola walkie, but won't be able to use it until closer to home).

I was thinking the same thing about the backpack (and I agree on clothes). I always have a change of clothes in the truck, and like the above poster, it's a blend of being able to use it for concealment, without advertising "Hey, I'm a wanna be Rambo, and have lots of cool stuff you could kill me for".... My shirt is a vented, khaki-colored fishing style shirt (lots of little pockets, like Shatner wore in "Sh*t My Dad Says", the TV show). They are terribly comfortable. Pants are a pair of khaki-colored cargo pants, and some light brown hiking boots. Nothing you wouldn't normally go wearing in the woods. The pockets of these clothes are packed with some extra goodies too, but nothing that is NEEDED (that isn't in the BOB), in case I don't have a chance to change, etc for whatever reason.

That's why my BOB is in a rather normal looking (though green) backpack too. My BOB looks no different than a student's school backpack.

I'd like to get a Goal ZERO for home, but don't need it in my BOB.

Here's a link to my Radio/Flashlight/Charger....
beprepared.com...

edit on 8-7-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 02:20 PM
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Very good video. Nice break down on the essentials and how to prioritize. Biggest problem I see is that most people don''t bother camping or trying skills and thus won't have a good idea of what they might need in their area and season.

I hadn't given gas masks much thought but those living in industrial areas and even anyone living near train tracks might need one. You never know when a fire or train derailment might send toxic fumes your direction.

Keeping warm is usually a simpler task than keeping cool. People who aren't used to being outdoors in extreme heat will suffer badly. Carry all the water you can, make sure you have a method of purification that doesn't require fire and travel during the cooler hours of early morning or night.
We were without power for a week last summer with temps over 100 and something I found helpful was those cans of compressed air for dusting your computer. They get very cold with use and when applied your wrists, neck or forehead can bring your body temperature down quickly. Not sure how practical it would be to have one in your pack but if heat were my primary worry i think I'd pack a can or 2.

People often don't know that the cover for their canteens will keep their water cooler if it's wet. When you fill your canteen be sure to soak the cover if it's hot outside.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals
Very good video. Nice break down on the essentials and how to prioritize. Biggest problem I see is that most people don''t bother camping or trying skills and thus won't have a good idea of what they might need in their area and season.

I hadn't given gas masks much thought but those living in industrial areas and even anyone living near train tracks might need one. You never know when a fire or train derailment might send toxic fumes your direction.

Keeping warm is usually a simpler task than keeping cool. People who aren't used to being outdoors in extreme heat will suffer badly. Carry all the water you can, make sure you have a method of purification that doesn't require fire and travel during the cooler hours of early morning or night.
We were without power for a week last summer with temps over 100 and something I found helpful was those cans of compressed air for dusting your computer. They get very cold with use and when applied your wrists, neck or forehead can bring your body temperature down quickly. Not sure how practical it would be to have one in your pack but if heat were my primary worry i think I'd pack a can or 2.

People often don't know that the cover for their canteens will keep their water cooler if it's wet. When you fill your canteen be sure to soak the cover if it's hot outside.


I don't know if I'd agree with the keeping warm is easier than keeping cool. While I'll admit I've never dealt with temps much over 105 I sure have had my share of -10's,0's, 10's. Its ok if you are moving, but hell if you can't.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by LibertysTeeth
 


Keeping warm is fairly easy. Keeping cool though is a whole different matter. If in Hot extremes, such as the desert or humid enviroment. You move at night when the temps are down. This is a no-brainer.

The opposite is true for a winter scenario.

Just as a tip. If you are the one producing these videos, stop showing the indiviual wearing body armor or Kevlar/ACH. Those would be only useful when defending the home front. On the move and I guarentee you that they will make you a target if you are traveling alone.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:28 PM
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reply to post by LibertysTeeth
 


Perhaps growing up in upstate NY got me adapted to cold and if there's snow making a shelter is fast and relatively easy. Wherever you are there's usually enough forest litter to create a debris shelter and cover yourself with leaves or grass. I wouldn't count fire as an option, often tactical good sense would preclude one using it. Unless one is trying to be found never being noticed is always the best approach.
After moving to Virginia though I've found the heat much harder to compensate for, carrying enough water for humid, 100+ degree days is near impossible. Any activity during the day costs heavily in lost fluids and electrolytes which much be replaced or cramped muscles, nausea and migraines set on.
We haven't even gotten to being sunburned or heat exhaustion yet.....
The BOB really is about getting a person someplace after an emergency situation. Truly hot weather forces one to find the coolest possible place and just wait it out. This is giving me an idea for a water filter that you could attach it to a stick then push it deep in soft ground to extract water through a tube attached to the other end. Like a big straw you stick in the ground. Gotta think about this one.

edit on 8-7-2013 by Asktheanimals because: corrections



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by TDawgRex
reply to post by LibertysTeeth
 


Keeping warm is fairly easy. Keeping cool though is a whole different matter. If in Hot extremes, such as the desert or humid enviroment. You move at night when the temps are down. This is a no-brainer.

The opposite is true for a winter scenario.

Just as a tip. If you are the one producing these videos, stop showing the indiviual wearing body armor or Kevlar/ACH. Those would be only useful when defending the home front. On the move and I guarentee you that they will make you a target if you are traveling alone.


The multicam/body armor etc is part of the "character" but I will keep it in mind. I've been trying to wind down the multicam and I agree, but I will cover that in another video.



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 01:54 PM
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I have to reiterate what Gazrok said about not wearing camo as it does advertise something. Companies like L.L. Bean make good outdoor clothing in neutral tones of green, gray and brown which don't attract attention when on the street. They often perform better as camouflage as well since they have no specific pattern which is often the wrong one for the environment and season you're in.

Having worked with groups of military and L.E. on camo this has been proven repeatedly. There really is no universal pattern that works in all terrain/seasons - a lesson the military has learned over and over again. In Fall & Winter brown is the dominant color, for Spring and Summer choose mostly greens. (see thread in signature for more information)
edit on 9-7-2013 by Asktheanimals because: added comment

edit on 9-7-2013 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



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