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PRISM - The Mirror That Betrays You

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posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 10:41 PM
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You know this, with all of the recent developments involving Snowden...we were talking at work and someone brought up the movie "Enemy Of The State". Closer and closer we get to this kind of "no one is truly innocent" mindset. It seems "they" will find a way to persecute you no matter what you do.

www.youtube.com...




posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 04:07 AM
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With such impressive omnipotent powers the NSA should be able to thwart any would-be bad guy huh? Why you would be a fool to attack the United States. Don't even try it. That sounds like a good message to put out there huh?


It's not to spy on some shadowy terrorist, it's for us. And you're right, no one is foolish enough to attack the United States-not any more, because we've demonstrated a complete mad dog Keyser Soze-level of vengance. We'll overthrow a country that didn't even attack us just because they're in the same general neighborhood. Our army has completely intimidated the terrorists, which is why the last few Al Queda attacks have been a miserable failed collection of shoe, underwear and wrong-fertilizer bombings that have terrorized no one. What, you think the Utah facility is an empty building, that the whole thing is a fake just to scare people?




edit on 8-7-2013 by Snsoc because: clarity



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:57 AM
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When I read about this I think of all the people involved working on the system. There must be thousands of technicians employed by the various authorities, plus those working at the various companies and on top of that add all the military and police personnel. A massive number of people employed to keep the rest of us safe.

So all of these people will have profiles which will also be monitored.

My next thought is that people like Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, now classed as spies, worked for the system. So it seems to me that the people most likely to cause problems are working for the system.

Lets face it your average postman, taxi driver, butcher or baker is unlikely to know anything about terrorist activities such as setting bombs, smuggling weapons, hijacking planes. They are too busy doing their normal routines to have time to get up to no good.

So we have the situation where this surveillance system is set up to watch the same people who set it up.

Have to go now as there is somebody banging on my front door.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:04 AM
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Hi all, I came out of lurk-mode after finding a new interview with Snowden held before he left Hawaii. It sheds a little more light on PRISM's capabilities and the extent of the surveillance and the inner-workings of the NSA.


Question: Do the NSA and its partners apply some kind of wide dragnet method to intercept phone calls, texts and data?

Snowden: Yes, but how much they can record, depends on the capabilities of the respective taps. Some data is held to be more worthwhile, and can therefore be recorded more frequently. But all this is rather a problem with foreign tapping nodes, less with those of the U.S. This makes the monitoring in their own territory so terrifying. The NSA’s options are practically limitless - in terms of computing power, space or cooling capacity for the computers.

Question: The NSA is building a new data center in Utah. What is it for?

Snowden: These are the new mass data storage facilities.

Question: For how long will the information there be stored?

Snowden: Right now it is still so, that the full text of collected material ages very quickly, within a few days, especially given its enormous amount. Unless an analyst marked a target or a particular communication. In that case the communication is saved for all eternity, one always get an authorization for that anyway. The metadata ages less quickly. The NSA at least wants all metadata to be stored forever. Often the metadata is more valuable than the contents of the communication, because in most cases, one can retrieve the content, if there is metadata. And if not, you mark all future communications that fits this metadata and is of interest, so that henceforth it will be recorded completely. The metadata tells you what you actually want from the broader stream.


Snowden Spiegel Interview - May 2013

Enjoy.
edit on 8-7-2013 by BrerRabbit because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 06:07 AM
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well, I appreciate all the work you put into this and after a careful evaluation of your contribution... I have to say, thanks for reminding me about the police! I forgot about that group.


edit on 8-7-2013 by Nephalim because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:37 AM
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Awesome thread Heff! Thanks for putting all that together.

I share your concerns and have been focusing on the same implications. But something I'm starting to wonder about: The power this PRISM system gives is so mind-boggling that I wonder if anyone or any group will be able to handle it. I cannot imagine a stable situation evolving from this.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:50 AM
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Thanks for this OP!

Having lived in a police state and been witness to how a "politically charged" poster, (which could barely be seen from the road) inside the house I was staying in was cause for the corrupt police to raid the house. Take us into the toilet and do an anal search.
If you reminded them of your rights (by asking for a warrant) they could easily plant a stash of drugs behind your toilet bowl and lock you up for 15 years, have your kids put into care, have your social security cheques stopped.....

With the information available thanks to PRISM it doesn't bear thinking about the possibilities. Scary stuff.
While I myself have never had a Farcebook account and kept a low profile (up till now) I agree with you that taking extreme measures to wipe yout tracks only makes you more vulnerable .

It's easy to sit back and say it's too late, but if ever there was a time to stand up and fight for your fight to privacy, it is now! This is Global.
Privacy International files legal challenge against UK government over mass surveillance programmes
A small step, but at least they're doing something and keeping it in the news...



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 08:23 AM
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I see PRIVACY as A SACRED RIGHT. It doesn't really matter WHO ruins my privacy or HOW. The minute you spy on my private communications you become a criminal in my eyes! No better than a drug pusher or bank robber. --- My 2 Cents



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Lada2000
I see PRIVACY as A SACRED RIGHT. It doesn't really matter WHO ruins my privacy or HOW. The minute you spy on my private communications you become a criminal in my eyes! No better than a drug pusher or bank robber. --- My 2 Cents


Add the founding fathers to your list then...



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 09:23 AM
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Thank those that are protecting us from the evil ones bent on bringing down society as we know it. Without these great protectors, there are some bastard out there that would pull the plug on American's got talent. We love Howard Stern on Venus, most of our females want to have mating with him.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by bowaconstricta
 


www.guardian.co.uk...



US privacy group challenging NSA and FBI collection of phone records Electronic Privacy Information Center to file petition asking supreme court to suspend FBI's blanket collection of data

The US supreme court will be asked to suspend the blanket collection of US telephone records by the FBI under an emergency petition due to be filed on Monday by civil rights campaigners at the Electronic Privacy Information Center (Epic).

This new legal challenge to the power of government agencies to spy on Americans follows the publication last month by the Guardian of a secret order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court ordering Verizon to hand over metadata from its phone records.

Previous attempts to appeal against the rulings of these courts have floundered due to a lack of public information about who might be caught up in the surveillance net, but the disclosure of specific orders by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden has opened the door to a flurry of new challenges. It comes as a similar legal challenge was filed in Britain on Monday.


looks like there are more challenges popping up every minute... good to see.
edit on 8-7-2013 by bowaconstricta because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by Variable
 


Apologies... In a moment of half-azzery I Googled and copies the top link for the key words I'd searched. As time permits - later this evening - I will find and provide sources that are more appropriate.

Egg on my face to be sure. LOL



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by Lada2000
I see PRIVACY as A SACRED RIGHT.


I think WE ALL find that truth to be self evident.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:13 PM
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posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:43 PM
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S all this data is coming form some place to a central server farm. So servers must be online.......anyone getting my drift here



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 05:33 AM
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Originally posted by Hefficide
reply to post by Variable
 


Apologies... In a moment of half-azzery I Googled and copies the top link for the key words I'd searched. As time permits - later this evening - I will find and provide sources that are more appropriate.

Egg on my face to be sure. LOL


Uhm, I'm actually glad that I didn't click on the real NSA website. You could have warned us. I clicked on it and I was like, "NO! You fool, put that away before Sauron sees you!"



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 06:32 AM
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Prism is a crazy topic but america will get over it like every other thing



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 06:32 AM
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Prism is a crazy topic but america will get over it like every other thing



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 07:14 AM
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Sorry for the delay in getting back to this. Real life has been hectic as of late.

Now that I've had a chance to catch up and do some digging, the site that I did originally source is not necessarily invalidated by the fact that it is not an official source. The "parody" part of their disclaimer seems to refer to their use of an NSA-like motif and URL - not the content provided on the page:


This is a parody of nsa.gov and has not been approved, endorsed, or authorized by the National Security Agency or by any other U.S. Government agency.

Much of this content was derived from news media, privacy groups, and government websites. Links to these sites are posted on the left-sidebars of each page.

Source

I've found an NPR article which verifies, to a degree, the potential storage capabilities of the NSA facility in Bluffdale.


The gargantuan $1.2 billion complex at a National Guard base 26 miles south of Salt Lake City features 1.5 million square feet of top secret space. High-performance NSA computers alone will fill up 100,000 square feet.

The estimated power of those computing resources in Utah is so massive it requires use of a little-known unit of storage space: the zettabyte. as the amount of data that would fill 250 billion DVDs.

The NSA's Utah Data Center will be able to handle and process five zettabytes of data, according to William Binney, a former NSA technical director . Binney's calculation is an estimate. An NSA spokeswoman says the actual data capacity of the center is classified.

The NSA's Utah Data Center will be able to handle and process five zettabytes of data, according to William Binney, a former NSA technical director . Binney's calculation is an estimate. An NSA spokeswoman says the actual data capacity of the center is classified.

"They would have plenty of space with five zettabytes to store at least something on the order of 100 years worth of the worldwide communications, phones and emails and stuff like that," Binney asserts, "and then have plenty of space left over to do any kind of parallel processing to try to break codes."

Source

To quantify what Cisco says of a zettabyte:


Cisco Source

Some anecdotal articles contend that the Utah center is actually dealing in Yottabytes and not Zettabytes. Regardless of which is closer to reality - we are talking about an unbelievable amount of storage and bandwidth potential. This also does not consider other fusion centers, research centers, military resources, or University cooperative programs.

It is well within the realm of possibility that every single digital transmission is being recorded and stored for a set period of time. Every single text, post, status update, call... all of it.

But this is only the starting point for my OP. As has been pointed out, others have posted about The Utah facility previously ( Though I am not bandwagon jumping at all, my first threads on cyber security issues, including domestic spying specifically date from over two and a half years ago and this is a theme I've visited several times ) - the point of this thread is to begin to discuss the ways in which this sort of unprecedented spying capacity, combined with an equally astounded computing capacity might be used or abused.

In my opinion the ultimate value and danger here is not necessarily that Uncle Sam might now if I send a naughty text to my girlfriend or not - or if I misbehave and stream a movie or TV show illegally. I am much, much more concerned with what can be done with the highly specific details being accessed as it applies to the creation of data sets and behavioral models.
edit on 7/10/13 by Hefficide because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 07:20 AM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


Before, many did not believe this guy..I did not read the entire thread so if already posted sorry






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