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Reports: 777 crash lands at San Francisco

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posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 07:52 AM
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Asiana has confirmed the manifest. There were 77 Koreans, 141 Chinese, 61 Americans, and 1 Japanese on board. There were 291 passengers and 16 crew.




posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 08:11 AM
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Some pictures from the scene:









posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 08:55 AM
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Interesting to note that 5 min prior to this occurrence that this happened, same airline, same model this was pointed out by another site?
RSOE Alert Map


Vehicle Incident in Greece on Saturday, 06 July, 2013 at 19:48 (07:48 PM) UTC
"The aircraft, a Boeing 777 200ER, was diverted to Athens at 0125 Hours Kenyan time after a fire warning indication in one of the cargo holds.

The one in San Fran:


Vehicle Incident in USA on Saturday, 06 July, 2013 at 19:53 (07:53 PM) UTC.
A Boeing 777 aircraft has crash-landed at San Francisco international airport.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by whatnext21
 


Same model, different airline. It was a Kenya Airways flight. The fire suppression system activated in the aft cargo hold. There was no apparent fire, or damage. Tests were conducted that showed the fire system was working, the aircraft was towed to a hangar for repairs and was scheduled to continue on today.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 09:03 AM
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Some 'conflicting' reports. Sky News reports that airline company boss says "nothing wrong with the engines". BBC news with same report, "nothing wrong mechanically"??



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by smurfy
 


The engine problems that affected BA38 in London was unique to the Rolls Royce engine. Asiana 214 was powered by Pratt & Whitney engines, so they shouldn't have been affected by the same problem.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 09:29 AM
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Asiana has confirmed that the fire started after the tail strike. The flight deck crew was comprised of three pilots with over 10,000 hours each, and a co-pilot with over 5,000 hours. The aircraft underwent routine maintenance in June, with no problems found. It flew from Seoul to Osaka with no problems.

The aircraft, registration HL7742, was delivered new from Boeing on 7 March 2006, and as of March 31st had flown 35,700 hours, and 5,185 cycles. It was one of 12 777s in Asiana's fleet.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 09:51 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by BABYBULL24
 


I'm sorry, but that picture pisses me off. Look at the size of the bags those people are carrying. If that fuselage had already been on fire, which part of it may have been and they didn't know it, they could have killed people behind them getting their bags, and getting them out the doors.

IT'S NOT WORTH A LIFE to save you're freaking computer. Leave the damn thing behind.


Zap,

I don't think they did it intentionally. Most likely they were in shock.

When people get huge adrenaline rushes and then survival mode kicks the brain doesn't work logically.

Just saying.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


That's an excuse for some of them, but, there should have been people there keeping them moving, and stopping them from taking the bags off. This isn't the first crash I've seen people with their bags afterwards, and some of them knew what they were doing. They very calmly said later, "I stood up, and got my bags, and then hurried my family off the plane." I can understand shock, but it's the ones that know what they're doing, or do it because they didn't bother to actually pay attention to the briefing (like most people) that irritate me.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 10:11 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by smurfy
 


The engine problems that affected BA38 in London was unique to the Rolls Royce engine. Asiana 214 was powered by Pratt & Whitney engines, so they shouldn't have been affected by the same problem.


hey Zap....isn't airline safety, for that matter aircraft safety "all about the maintenance" so to speak?.....aircraft parts wear out, there have also been parts used by airlines around the world that were sub-standard, due to cost cutting by the airline company.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 10:26 AM
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reply to post by jimmyx
 


There were, and still are, but with that particular problem, it had to do with the heat exchanger in the engine. It wasn't providing enough heat to keep ice from forming in the fuel. The P&W engines use a different type of heat exchanger that wouldn't have the same problem.

There could theoretically be other problems that led to this accident, but my gut says strictly pilot error. Either they were overloaded trying to fly the manual approach and run their checklists, or crew coordination broke down (this has led to some of the worst aircraft accidents in history and has always been a problem).
edit on 7/7/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by smurfy
 


The engine problems that affected BA38 in London was unique to the Rolls Royce engine. Asiana 214 was powered by Pratt & Whitney engines, so they shouldn't have been affected by the same problem.


Yes I know that, I was commenting on the two differing news reports.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 10:44 AM
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In Athens 5 minutes before the SFO crash Same airline another 777-200ER had a fire and almost didn't make it to land.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by smurfy
 


The most likely mechanical problem that would have caused this would be engine related though. Rule out engines, and there's a good probability you've ruled out any mechanical problem. Especially with the ILS being off. You could be looking at a radio altimeter problem, or an autothrottle issue, but the most likely mechanical problem would be engine related.

We'll find out for sure in 10 days when the NTSB interim report comes out.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by SWCCFAN
 


Different airline, and they weren't in any danger.


Kenya Airways flight KQ117 from Amsterdam to Nairobi has made an emergency stop at Greece capital Athens, a press statement from the airline communications office has said.

"Kenya Airways wishes to inform its passengers and the general public of the diversion of flight KQ117 that was flying from Amsterdam to Nairobi with 301 passengers on board."

"The aircraft, a Boeing 777 200ER, was diverted to Athens at 0125 Hours Kenyan time after a fire warning indication in one of the cargo holds. As is the normal standard procedure in the industry, the fire suppression system was activated and the aircraft diverted to the nearest airport for further assessment."

The statement further says that tests have been conducted on the fire detection system and it has been found to be working properly.

The airline says that the crew and passengers have been taken to a local hotel and the flight is set to depart Athens at 1700 hours and is expected to arrive in Nairobi at 2255hours.

www.the-star.co.ke...

Same type of aircraft, but it was a Kenya Airways flight. There was apparently no evidence of fire, the fire suppression system was repaired and recharged, and the flight was scheduled to continue on.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
Asiana has confirmed that the fire started after the tail strike. The flight deck crew was comprised of three pilots with over 10,000 hours each, and a co-pilot with over 5,000 hours. The aircraft underwent routine maintenance in June, with no problems found. It flew from Seoul to Osaka with no problems.

The aircraft, registration HL7742, was delivered new from Boeing on 7 March 2006, and as of March 31st had flown 35,700 hours, and 5,185 cycles. It was one of 12 777s in Asiana's fleet.


Were the pilots familiar enough with that particular airport? General experience is one thing and specific knowledge is another thing. The ILS was off for maintaince so if the pilots never landed there before, considering the unique features of that airport and runway, such as the piers protruding before the runway, well you get the idea. Too low and bust!



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 11:11 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I think what he is implying is that we were taking the electric particle stream from a space based weather event. An event that just happened to effect the earth almost the exact same time that we had two of the same planes although not from the same carrier experience, technical difficulties, causing one to crash land and another to land with incident.

I'm pretty sure what the implication is and since you happen from what I have read of you posts a technical guru on aircraft military civilian alike.

Is it possible for say a magnetic energy, or high energy flux to create a fire or short out equipment and cause something like this (Fire, Crash, etc.)

The coincidence to some I speak with they find very uncanny....

SaneThinking



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 11:13 AM
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The people on this 777 were very lucky in my opinion. This could have been so much worse - plane breaks apart more severely, fuel tanks spill and ignite, only a few people manage to escape, some people get trapped in the fuselage et cetera.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by EarthCitizen07
 


That they haven't said. Asiana has regular flights to San Francisco, so with that level of experience, I would think that at least one of the crew had flown into there in the past.

The two fatalities were Ye Mengyuan, and Wang Linjia, both 16, and students at Jiangshan Middle School. One was thrown clear of the wreckage after the impact, the other was found near the wreckage, both were thrown from the aircraft.

Benjamin Levy was onboard the flight, and said that there was no warning from the crew, and their initial response appeared to show they were overwhelmed at first. He said that he has flown into SFO many times, and on the approach he thought that the water seemed awfully close on approach. He said they appeared to be 10 feet over the water, without being able to see the runway. He thought that the pilot knew what he was doing, and everything would be ok, just before they slammed into the jetty.

San Francisco General said they received 53 patients, including 26 children. Six of those are in critical including one child. Four adults and one child that arrived in critical condition have been upgraded.

The Asiana CEO has said that the accident likely didn't occur because of pilot error due to their experience level. The FDR and CVR are in Washington and the NTSB hopes to have them decoded today.

Experience level doesn't mean much if crew coordination or workload were an issue. The KLM-Pan Am crash on Tenerife was caused by one of KLMs most experienced pilots.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 11:18 AM
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Imagine a pilot trying to land at lindbergh field for the first time, not knowing about the city garage that directly blocks the decent into the airfield, not having ILS guidance, a little bad weather.




Why THE HELL does FAA allow such "accidents waiting to happen" airports?



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