Speed of light and time and human ageing

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posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:45 PM
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This is my first post after many years of reading. And this is more of a question to the smarter people here. For a long time I have wondered if you were on a planet that takes longer than 365 days to travel around the sun would you live longer. A sol on mars is longer than an earth day. If our body is set to a 24 hour day as many people say. Would an earth day be the same on a human as a sol day on mars if that human was on mars. With days being longer on mars and a year (time to go around the sun) being longer would humans set their biological clock to that time and have a normal life span of say 150 years because days on mars years are longer. Maybe this would answer why ets could be so old and be so advanced as our time goes faster than theirs do. Although a sol is only 23 min longer than an earth day and a mars year being much longer it does add up and another planet might be 48 hour days long vrs 24. That's the question I pose and sorry my first thread wasn't a better one.




posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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Well, I don't know about on another planet, but let me tell you about my (and many millions of others) observation of time.

As you get older time speeds up!

I'm not joking!

I'm heading towards 60 and for me a day seems more like 12 hours. When I was a kid a day seemed to last forever. So, I don't think it matters WHERE you are, its got more to do with WHO you are, and how OLD you are.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:00 PM
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Nothing wrong with that question.
It's a good one for your first thread too.

It's all relative as they say.
Let's stick with humans for simplicity.
Your question is would we live longer if we were on say Saturn?
Which takes about 29 years to travel once around the Sun.

The answer I think is nope. We'd live the same amount of time
given the same creature comforts on Earth.
But on Saturn we'd die before we're 3 years old.
I don't think the orbit plays into longevity.
But who knows?



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by AmazedByU
 


I can't answer your question of whether or not the length of a planet's day/year affect the life spans of its inhabitants. I have never experimented nor researched anything on the subject. But I do think DNA would be more of a factor. A cat for instance lives about 15 years, a person can get up around 100, and tortoise live upwards of 200 years. Seems like a more plausible explanation to me for the length of alien life is that their DNA allows it. But like I said, I know nothing on the subject of biological clocks vs life span, so maybe you are on to something!



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by AmazedByU
 

no, it wouldn't change the lifespan of any creature (assuming the climate, atmosphere, and other constants were the same).

a human's natural lifespan is limited by end caps on chromosomes called telomeres. telomeres act as a buffer to prevent vital information from being cut off during cell replication. telomeres become shorter as one gets older because small parts are cut off during every division. eventually the cells become less and less functional and begin to lose vital information, which then can cause the cell to become cancerous if the body's defenses fail to stop the cell from rapidly dividing.

the rotational cycle of a planet won't affect this. other things may be affected, like stress levels, which could have an impact on longevity, but basic aging shouldn't be affected.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by AmazedByU
 


Say that we were on a planet with six hundred days to make a year. It sure would feel like we were living a lot longer, there are too many days that we have to work in a year as it is. Maybe we could have three day weekends to balance it out. Perception is time is what influences recognition of time. As you get older, time flies. I still haven't studied what is really happening with this perception change.

If our orbit changed speed, life would probably compensate for these changes.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:34 PM
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The lifespan should be the same. BUT there could be other factors that come into play. if certain predatory animals that usually are awake when we are asleep, interact with you because your sleep schedule during certain light vs. dark hours are altered, you could become hunted and die early.

Did that make sense? i was having trouble wording it.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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I'm thinking about the Theory of General Relativity is what I'm thinking



We won't live longer naturally. But time wise, we live longer.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by AmazedByU
 


Yes, we will live longer. Because we will be in different time & space.
When Jesus(ESA) will come from skies resting his hand on two angels. He will be of same age and physics when he was taken to above strata.nothing change for him.when he will come to earth he will get marry and die as normal people do and get buried like other prophets.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by Kuroodo
 



I'm thinking about the Theory of General Relativity is what I'm thinking

relativity wouldn't do anything for aging either relative to the inhabitants. the inhabitants on the planet would observe themselves as traveling the same speed as each other, so relativistic effects wouldn't enter into the equation.

don't take my posts as "you're wrong, and i'm grilling you for it" i'm just explaining why it wouldn't have an effect.

relativistic effects could be observed to occur between two different planets, but people on each respective planet would measure their lives as being the same average length.
edit on 6-7-2013 by Bob Sholtz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by AmazedByU
 

Guess what? No-one knows, because no-one has spent long enough on another astronomical body to find out for themselves.

Of course – as most of the preceding posts point out in one way or another – there is absolutely no reason to believe it will make the slightest difference. Other factors – such as the stresses of space travel and living in an artificial environment – can be expected to have a greater effect on astronauts' natural rates of ageing.

But nobody really knows. Maybe the key to immortality is going to live on Pluto. I doubt it, but there you go.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by AmazedByU
 





being longer would humans set their biological clock to that time and have a normal life span of say 150 years because days on mars years are longer.


I would say the opposite.

If the days and years are longer than we live a shorter number of Mars years.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 





Say that we were on a planet with six hundred days to make a year. It sure would feel like we were living a lot longer,



How so, when a average life span is be about 70 years in a 365 day year.


Our life span would be just over half the 70 years if the 365 day year was 600 days or over.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 





But nobody really knows.


Well if there is no biological transformation about how the body ages then I would say we do know as mars year is longer than 1 earth year, so if all factors are the same and its just a simple if we live till 70 years on Earth using earth years would we live 70 Mars years using Mars years with no change in our aging process then the answer would be No, the 70 years would drop.

Like I said in another post if our year was lets say about 730 days the average human life span would be about half of what it is now living in 365 day year.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 01:59 PM
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Originally posted by InhaleExhale
reply to post by rickymouse
 





Say that we were on a planet with six hundred days to make a year. It sure would feel like we were living a lot longer,



How so, when a average life span is be about 70 years in a 365 day year.



Our life span would be just over half the 70 years if the 365 day year was 600 days or over.


You don't think they would give us anymore paid holidays if the year was six hundred days do you?
You would still get only two weeks vacation and I suppose they would have eight working day weeks with only the same two days off for the weekend. Life could be a lot worse with six hundred day years.
edit on 8-7-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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I guess to clarify it more. They say the faster you travel in space the slower you age compaired to people here in earth. If you are on another planet and it spins faster or slower than earth and it takes longer or shorter amount of time to travel around its sun. Wouldnt that effect our biology and dictate how long we live. Thanks everyone for posting



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 01:13 PM
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Sorry for any misspellings, I'm posting from my phone and it has a mind of its own sometimes. As you can guess I ment to say "on" earth not in it LOL



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 01:21 PM
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I have heard some compelling arguments that the farther away from Earth you are the slower time gets. The most verifiable and repeatable test of this is with the GPS satellites in our Orbit. They have to be a adjusted through time dilation in order to be the same time as Earth. Perhaps gravity and time have some yet undiscovered link to each other.



posted on Jul, 9 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by jjkenobi
I have heard some compelling arguments that the farther away from Earth you are the slower time gets. The most verifiable and repeatable test of this is with the GPS satellites in our Orbit. They have to be a adjusted through time dilation in order to be the same time as Earth. Perhaps gravity and time have some yet undiscovered link to each other.


Exactly! I'm wondering if speed and gravity effects time. For an ET to travel great distance, besides the obvious, there has to be something about time as we know it that we don't understand.



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 01:36 AM
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reply to post by AmazedByU
 


I suppose if you somehow you could dwell on a planet whose mass was larger than our Earth then you would live slightly longer, not due to your biological clock changing, but due to the fact that time slows down near any massive body due the gravitational warping of space time. (as predicted by Einstein general relativity) Gravity and time dilation are the same thing: they are both consequences of the curvature of space/time near a massive body. You can't have one without the other. Take black holes as the most extreme example . This link will explain that theory a hell of a lot better than my childish scribbling's [url=http://www.black-holes.org/relativity6.html] . As another poster has already stated GPS satellites orbiting the Earth have to correct for the fact that time passes very very slightly more slowly on the Earth's surface than it does in geosynchronous orbit -- by about one second per every 60 years. And there lies your dilemma, to expand your lifetime longer than by even the shortest time you would have to live on a body with a humongous mass ,the gravity will be immense at that location and you would never be able to leave to enjoy the benefits'.

Sorry, I cannot get the link to work, dang it!
.
Another example of time dilation comes from the Graphic novel 'The ballad of Halo Jones', there is a war fought on a planet with a huge mass, when the soldiers return from battles they have been fighting for weeks (from there perspective) they find that only a day in the real 'time' had passed.
edit on 11-7-2013 by windsorblue because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-7-2013 by windsorblue because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-7-2013 by windsorblue because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-7-2013 by windsorblue because: (no reason given)





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