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Elbaradei to be named Egypt's interim PM

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posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:38 PM
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Elbaradei to be named Egypt


www.aljazeera.com

Opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei was chosen as Egypt's interim prime minister, according to sources close to the presidency.

A military source confirmed that the former UN nuclear watchdog chief was to be sworn in as premier later on Saturday, three days after the army overthrew Morsi.
(visit the link for the full news article)

edit on 6-7-2013 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:38 PM
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I don't see this going over well.

I'm not sure who they could name that WOULD go over well, but somebody with this close of ties to the UN and the west is bound to ruffle some feathers.

I expect the Pro-Morsi crowd will be less than thrilled.

I dont know a ton about Elbaradeli, personally, but he seems to be an intellectual, which isnt a bad thing.

www.aljazeera.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:46 PM
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Pretty reasonable choice; nobel prize winner and someone the UN trusts. This coup should be the leading news for awhile. When's the last time a major coup was this successful?



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Elbaradei to be named Egypt


www.aljazeera.com

Opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei was chosen as Egypt's interim prime minister, according to sources close to the presidency.

A military source confirmed that the former UN nuclear watchdog chief was to be sworn in as premier later on Saturday, three days after the army overthrew Morsi.
(visit the link for the full news article)

edit on 6-7-2013 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)



ElBaradei is the National Salvation Front’s negotiator in the military “roadmap” process. He supports a $4.8 billion loan deal with the International Monetary Fund, which Egypt has been negotiating for almost a year.

Advocates hope the loan could help kick-start Egypt's moribund economy. But it would also mean implementing potentially unpopular cuts in fuel and food subsidies, and tax increases.

IMF loans and their accompanying austerity measures have had adverse effects on economies in Asia and Europe in the last few decades. Be careful what you wish for, Egypt.

Voice of Russia, Reuters
Read more: english.ruvr.ru...


What could go wrong?



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by Lawgiver
Pretty reasonable choice; nobel prize winner and someone the UN trusts. This coup should be the leading news for awhile. When's the last time a major coup was this successful?
Time will tell how successful it will be, though....there are a lot of Morsi supporters that are going to do what they can to keep it from being 'smooth'



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:11 PM
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Smooth is a relative term. The ability of a new leader brought to power via a coup, is now going to get the world bank to give them a new financial agreement. Think about that. World governments are now looking at an active template on how to overthrow a current regime and quickly make itself a part of the financial global establishment. It is a forced legitimacy within 8 days.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:26 PM
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I remember profiles of him on TV from the time of the elections. Although he seemed like the obvious choice to western eyes, his popularity was not enough to get him on the ballot --if my memory serves me correctly.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:41 PM
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Oh Egypt.... All this? The removal of Mubarak... The turmoil in-between and enduring rule under the little brother of the Taliban? All to reach the point of seeing Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei leading the nation? I'll say it's a move for stability anyway. If he does Egypt like he worked/works at the UN, nothing will ever really happen and everyone will be peaceful while on the edge of killing each other. I suppose it beats the alternative of actually killing each other openly but..... Really?? ALL that, for this?

You asked for it, Egypt.




posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 




You asked for it, Egypt.


The Egyptian people asked for this like the American people asked for Obamacare and NDAA and NSA surveillance and a whole lot of other things.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by frazzle
 


No comparison whatsoever. The Military in the case of Egypt has been siding with and not against the people. It's a rare but not unique example of it happening but it's been a pleasant and hopeful thing to see.

I guess they lack candidates willing to be the bullseye to the Brotherhood for awhile and this one is willing to play the role. Stability wise, they really could do worse, if stability is what they are looking for here. Eventually, 10's of millions of people do need to get back to making sure crops get harvested, books get written and trains run on time.

It'll just be interesting to see how this goes. I don't know what I was expecting to counter the Jihadi nature of Mursi, but this wasn't quite it. Time will tell.....



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 



Stability wise, they really could do worse, if stability is what they are looking for here. Eventually, 10's of millions of people do need to get back to making sure crops get harvested, books get written and trains run on time.


More like making sure that the IMF loan gets paid in a timely manner.

ElBaradei, a former head of the U.N. nuclear watchdog, urged Islamist President Mohamed Mursi to appoint a strong, inclusive government with what he called a professional finance minister to work with the IMF.

uk.reuters.com...

ETA: Apparently Morsi had been stalling on the IMF loan for the whole year he was in office and was in negotiations with .... oh no, Russia .... on a possible loan and also discussing BRICS.

In politics and money nothing happens by chance, including "spontaneous" protests and clashes.
edit on 6-7-2013 by frazzle because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by frazzle
 


I believe the things we're seeing happen across several nations and from the Atlantic to the Indian Border are about far far more than any monetary obligation or even modern political games. One side, on the West, is playing games at that level but the other is looking just a bit further into the past. Not even all THAT far....but far enough for people like Obama to apparently miss the boat entirely (and this guy was one of his preferences as a U.S. pick after Mubarak, too)

It's not even that complicated but I'm shocked by how few see it, even now. It's about Faith....



Where it's at now and ....



Where it's been before. The Arab Spring, as it's been called, has simply been following the outlines of the last major regional Caliphate for bringing nations in line as something closer to like minded states. Egypt just tossed a big wrench into that plan. This choice for interim leader isn't as big a wrench as I might have liked....but he'll do for at least getting things off the edge of war, I suppose.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Great maps, thanks. But colorful as they are, they cannot predict the future.


It's not even that complicated but I'm shocked by how few see it, even now. It's about Faith....


Right you are. Its about the dwindling faith of billions of people around the world, including their leaders, in the value of the dollar as a world reserve currency. Current wars, both overt and covert are about keeping the dollar on top by hook or by crook (mostly crook), IOW, banker's Wars. But once faith is gone its just a matter of time, and the clock is ticking.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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Paul Joseph Watson hit the nail on the head.

Mohamed ElBaradei: Globalist Pied Piper Of The Egyptian Revolt
Paul Joseph Watson
January 29, 2011



The revolt in Egypt is an organically driven people-power movement to oust a dictator, restore universal freedoms, and wrestle the country free from the clutches of the US military-industrial complex, but the man now being positioned to form a new government is a pied piper working for the very same globalists and NGO’s that autocrat leader Hosni Mubarak has dutifully served for nearly 30 years.

Enter former top UN official and staunch Mubarak adversary Mohamed ElBaradei, who recently returned to Cairo in a bid to lead the protest movement. ElBaradei serves on the Board of Trustees of the International Crisis Group.

International Crisis Group is a shadowy NGO (non-governmental organization) that enjoys an annual budget of over $15 million and is bankrolled by the likes of Carnegie, the Ford Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, as well as George Soros’ Open Society Institute. Soros himself serves as a member of the organization’s Executive Committee. In other words, this is a major geopolitical steering group for the global elite.

The fact that their man ElBaradei is being primed to head up the post-Mubarak government should set alarm bells ringing in the ears of every demonstrator who is protesting in the name of trying to wrestle Egypt away from the clutches of new world order control.

Even more ironic is the fact that another powerful globalist who sits on the board of International Crisis Group, Zbigniew Brzezinski, warned last year that the international hierarchy of which he is a key component was under threat from a “global awakening” that would be led by young radicals in third world countries. Having accurately predicted the wave of revolt now spreading like wildfire across the globe, Brzezinski and his fellow globalists are preparing to pick up the pieces in order to continue business as usual, while the people who risked their lives for real change will be the victims of a monumental deception. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.


This isn't "THE PEOPLE" overthrowing a dictator, sorry if you're that gullible. The military that overthrew Morsi is the main recipient of US aid, and they are protecting their coffers.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by frazzle
 


Well, it's not about pretty maps, but the showing of a cycle and trend. There have been multiple Empires/Caliphates to cover that area in the last 1400+ years. How it's fractured and broken into so many little pieces is the modern day exception to the long running rule of history and how that area of the world best seems to function.

I'm not sure I agree with all that but it's the logic behind the moves, in my view, for a good deal of what's been seen since Tunisia started things in 2011. Actually, it was a bit before that with Hezbollah taking political control in Lebanon to be specific. Then Tunisia, then Egypt and on it's gone. Reforming a Caliphate that predates currency or banks in the modern world

IMO, Some things transcend "tptb", even if they personally don't see it. Cultural shifts of this sort go beyond those pedestrian and daily issues of whose dollar is in one's pocket for a given year.

Just my personal take on a good part of what we're seeing ...but then, it's only one of many factors and what makes that region of the world the fun house of diplomacy. There is always another layer. Always a game within the game, it seems.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 



How it's fractured and broken into so many little pieces is the modern day exception to the long running rule of history and how that area of the world best seems to function.


You mean how it was fractured and broken into pieces during the world wars which forced the people of the mideast into "states" that weren't natural to their ways of life? You mean how all those fractured pieces were sucked into a global banking system that was unnatural to their methods of trade?

Don't be so focused on caliphates and Islamists, that's a distraction. Read METADATAs post above and realize that the trendsetters don't follow god's laws or nature's, they follow the money because they're only interested in gaining heaven on earth, even if they have to kill a lot of people and put others through hell first to get to their "heaven". Even if they have to scare people into believing its the threat of a caliphate and not them who's doing the terrorizing.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by frazzle
 


What I find very interesting as I explore and learn about other cultures as well as Faiths is how each side, in whatever sense 'side' may be defined in a topic, comes to define things through their own sense of values.

We, in the West, have become so blinded and so singularly focused on money, materialism and it's distribution to each of us in ever greater quantities by one form or another, that I think we've fallen into the trap of thinking everyone in the world is the same way.

Not everyone define their goals and long term strategic planning in terms of loans, currencies or what bank is in control of what block of nations. All of that matters, of course and nothing in the world happens without due consideration given to that element, but it's fallacy to think that represents even the MAIN factor which motivates everyone in the world.

I think throwing money around and assuming everyone in the world is corruptible with it (as well as how often it's actually proven out true, frankly) is a large part of what has generated so much backlash against the US. Precisely because NOT everyone bows to the Gods of money and power through corruption with it. The sad thing I see is....America used to be bad about using that as a tool to manipulate other nations. Over time, it's become a victim of it, itself. From within? Outside? It doesn't much matter...but we've become the worst of what we once only used as a tool.

Still.. not everyone sets policy or actions by it and the Mid-East is probably the very best example of where that's true, IMO. They don't even see interest rates or banks in the same sense as the rest of the world, as a factual thing.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:28 PM
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Islamic fundamentalists out....... banker backed globalist in......

could this be just one case where the banker controlled candidate lost the election but won the war? ElBaradei is a globalist puppet beholden to the banks and the central banking system.....

after there is no Arab Spring just business as usual for the globalists....



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 



What I find very interesting as I explore and learn about other cultures as well as Faiths is how each side, in whatever sense 'side' may be defined in a topic, comes to define things through their own sense of values.

We, in the West, have become so blinded and so singularly focused on money, materialism and it's distribution to each of us in ever greater quantities by one form or another, that I think we've fallen into the trap of thinking everyone in the world is the same way.


I enjoyed reading your latest thoughts on this issue and agree with much of what you said in this post, especially the part about America becoming a victim of its own manipulation of other peoples. That's just too true, it is a trap, one I'd like to see Egypt break free of. Well, and us, too.

Its almost one of those live by the sword die by the sword, do unto others moments. Unfortunately we've got a lot of innocent blood on our hands, as well, so people do have a justifiable reason to fear an equally bloody backlash. Its just a darned shame that "unincorporated" and uncontaminated leaders cannot be put in positions of authority there, here or anywhere else.

ElBaradei may seem like a good choice on the surface, but its proven that he's just as embedded with the global bankers and mega corps as any we have to deal with here in America. I say let Egypt deal with their global fascists and let us deal with our own. It would take all of us (Americans) working together to do it, which is why they project two extreme and opposing sides of every subject into our consciousness. There is no middle ground.

Wouldn't it be amazing if they could find some middle ground in the middle east?

edit on 6-7-2013 by frazzle because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 07:42 PM
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Update:

CAIRO (Reuters) - Egypt's political transition after President Mohamed Mursi was ousted by the military stumbled at the first hurdle, after the choice of liberal politician Mohamed ElBaradei as interim prime minister was thrown into doubt by Islamist objections.


ElBaradei's nomination had been confirmed by several sources and state media on Saturday, but just before midnight a presidential spokesman told reporters that the prime minister had not in fact been chosen.


The abrupt U-turn came amid opposition to the appointment by the Nour Party, Egypt's second Islamist force after Mursi's Muslim Brotherhood movement, highlighting the challenge the military faces in finding consensus among liberals and conservatives on who should run the country.


news.yahoo.com...

Just as I suspected...





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