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How do you stay motivated when you're inbetween jobs???

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posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 03:04 PM
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I was doing really well in life. Had my own house, income, etc. Then out of know where things rapidly changed. Lost my income, gained some law suits which didn't go my way, and gained a tax audit which also didn't go my way (in in a big way). I basically got whipped out in no time flat!

So now I'm living in one room in my relatives basement wondering what the hell happened! I'm just trying to stay motivated and pick up the pieces. I figure life could be worse. I still have my health at least and I do have one new business idea I'm working on, but it's still a long ways off, but I am working on it.

Has anyone gone through something like this? How did you stay motivated and how did you turn things around?





posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


I have seen many people refuse jobs because they thought it was beneath them, and these people are the ones that suffered for it.

So, rule number 1, no job is beneath me. I don't care if it's dishwashing in order to bring in a check. More importantly, I know me. If I go without a job for too long I will fall into a lazy rut I won't be able to get myself out of. Sometimes a job is not about money, but about staying active for when the right job comes along.

That said, I have never been without a job for more than a couple of days. I literally hit every place of employment within my reach. Rule 2: If someone offers minimum wage, take it.

One time I traded up to better paying jobs three times in three weeks.
edit on 7/5/2013 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 03:14 PM
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Being broke or relying on others motivates me like no other.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


So now I'm living in one room in my relatives basement wondering what the hell happened!

Is there some part you are leaving out? Why you lost everything? I don't know about your particular situation, it sounds a lot like one I went through. I know why I wound up flat on my back looking up.

Thats the good thing about hitting bottom. Theres nowhere to go but up.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


I have gone through it. Still kind of am, so I'll let you know. I did find a job though, but not really what I need to be doing (or earning), but better than unemployment.

My motivation was simply to pay my bills. I still look back and can't figure out how we got through the time I was out.
edit on 5-7-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


Had the same thing happen to me twice in the last 12 months and to top it off, a major house repair bill that wiped out my savings.

What i recommend is keep the same routine-get up at the same time as if you were working, and make job hunting your first priority each day.

Next, make sure you achieve something each day, no matter how small-mow the lawn, clean out the garage, even write a bit of that novel you've been thinking about for years (maybe thats just me). whatever it takes.

Finally-stay positive. Tell yourself 50 times each day that you will get a new job-because you will, its just its hard to see it right now.

I'd say good luck, but you dont need it-you will succeed.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 03:58 PM
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This is how I did it.

Finding a job, WAS MY JOB. I worked that job 8 hours a day 5 days a week. Every single day I would get up, go down to the starbucks (I needed coffee and internet access) and I applied for jobs all day.

I got so well known by the baristas at the starbucks that they started giving me free coffee all day cause they knew what I was doing.

I got a job (washing dishes, cause no job is beneath me) And once I got that job, I started looking for another job. I found that if you have a job, it's much easier to get another job. I got another job at a car wash.

So, for now, treat looking for a job, as a job.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 04:07 PM
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As a tech worker, that's happened to me a couple of times. First time, I went abroad and worked for a semi-startup company who were looking for people with my skills. Then I found out after six months that my predecessors had left after they found themselves pigeonholed and not allowed them to keep their skills up to date. Having those staff leave had made the CEO furious and he had become excessively possessive of his employees. I was now in the same situation (he saw our group as a "holding tank" for staff for other projects). Then another six months later, whan an external customer wanted the "most qualified graduate to work on their project". I was given the choice of staying with the company and moving away from my field of work or leaving. So I left. I had to move to a job 1000 miles away, six months later. Fortunately, that last six years.

Couple of years later, I did a PhD. It was a dream for three years, where I was publishing papers and building a research profile, even being asked by European R&D companies if I was going to be presenting papers. Then all hell broke loose. An ex-alumni student from China demanded all the work of my thesis before I had the chance to publish. I refused, he went up to my supervisor (who backed me up), the head of department, and even the principal of the university. Next thing, I was being told to give my work to another student. I refused and they dragged my thesis out for four years. It took me another six months to find temporary work (salary < cost of living in London) that only lasted a month. I took another year off, when I went abroad for another good job that has lasted two years so far.

My advice, look to countries in Scandinavia and Europe. They are desperate for skilled people who can speak fluent English.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by HauntWok
 



This is how I did it.

Finding a job, WAS MY JOB. I worked that job 8 hours a day 5 days a week.


Yep, that too.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


It is really hard, but you just have to try and stay positive and work at it as hard as you can. My last job ended after the contract came to a head and I now earn half as much as what I did befofe and I also work for an absolute slave driver who works me half to death for my pittance each day, but it's better than not having any work at all so I'm not miserable, not super happy either.

You need to just apply to loads and loads of jobs and go to companies who arn't advertising as most jobs arn't even openly advertised. It's a real tough situation atm, nobody wants to pay a decent wage and agencies have driven wages down to the bare minimum, it's really disgusting actually. Being positive though will rib off on future employers and other people who may offer you a job.

It's hard, but stay strong mate, eventually something will come along. Just work hard at making it happen.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 05:03 PM
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If your inlaws have the space to spare in the back yard, I would suggest starting a garden. It is a simple and efficient way to contribute as things run their course in the job search. Start small and don't overwhelm yourself. A small herb garden is nice and relaxing, offering just enough maintenance to keep you busy, but no real loss if you have to work on your plant skills as I did.


4 years ago, I would have suggested getting lost in a fantasy video-game world...... My how times have changed.

Best wishes to you in these times.

Boba



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


This is a great point. A lot of lomng term unemployed people who really just can't be bothered to work think like this. I saw it on a tv show and they were refusing to work at fast food joints and the crazy thing is when you're on benefits you are not supposed to be allowed to refuse a job for a reason like that! Yet they did openly and acted like they were above the workers at these places. Well at least those workers actualy work hard for their money and don't just sit around doing nothing all day. Also those sorts of companies are huge international corperations who have great benefits and employment structures to help anyone who wants something more to rise up and become a lot more than just a server.

Almost any job is better than no job,



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 05:19 PM
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Been there brother.

Just focus on your next move.

Picture yourself starting over.

But picture it in a positive way.

I had nothing.

Nothing.

Pictured my next job.

Got it.

I pictured myself driving a fast car.

Got it.

Pictured the girl siting next to me in that car.

Got her.

Married her.

Moved up in my new job.

Moved away to a new state.

Planing to move to Sedona.

But with the same job.

Just looking to upgrade at every moment in my life.

Get money.

Get it.

Go for it.

Do it now!




edit on 5-7-2013 by Frankenchrist because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 05:31 PM
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My in between was a big deeper, but it helped me, to learn to appreciate the little things. Everything you can do without spending money. Enjoy your time, and fill it with as much possible stuff you find useful to do.

Keep feeling good about what you do, even if it doesn't get payed, but you can help out others or your community.

This way you will stay fit for work, and make yourself part of your community. A new job is only a matter of time.
After every tunnel, there will shine light at the end, just like the sun will be after every cloud..

Cheer up and make yourself stay part of everyday life, this way you will stay getting noticed by others. Including people that could need a new employee.


Good luck.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 06:10 PM
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I have done this twice in the last 7 years. First time i was Director of a call center. My mom had just finished chemo, so I was not going to leave her here alone. In call center work, you typically move to a location where you are hired. They are the type of professionals who live in a different city every two years.

So I stuck it out around here, taking a job as a customer service rep at a payday loan store. I worked for my former HR Manager. She treated me very, very well. And I did right by her, working hard and carrying my weight.

Meanwhile I kept looking for something that would challenge me and use some of my skills. I applied to be GM of a hotel, and someone was stupid enough to hire me. 2 years later, ownership changed and I was replaced by a brother in law of the owner.

So i applied to work at a radio station doing sales solely for commission. This protected my unemployment, and kept me active in the business community. It took me about a month to find the job I have now (Controller in a hotel/resort).

I just adapted to whatever environment was put in front of me. In so doing I stayed active in the local business community, and made sure people remembered that I was here. You would be surprised how much support folks will give you when they see you work hard to stay relevant. They knew I was over qualified to be selling no ads right after the 2008 economic fiasco, and continued to help promote me. The job I have now I got from a guy who knows the owner of the hotel I am at. He gave me a reference, since we are in Rotary Club together.

What you know will help you in the interview. Who you know gets you the interview.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


I never attained the heady height of total financial independence, so I do not know what it is like to loose it. I have lived most of my life unable to make any savings, and wondering wether I get to eat next month. I lived for a while, on the streets also, and that was when I was employed! I sofa surfed for a while too.

All I can say, having been to the bottom end, is that when I was at literally rock bottom, it gave me strength, confidence, power over myself. I mastered myself as a man, in a way that I never thought would be necessary or even possible before. For me, living on the edge of oblivion is something I am comfortable with now, so if it ever becomes necessary again, I know I will handle it, because once you have been there, there is nothing to fear from it.

However, these things strike us all differently. Motivation for me was simple. Live day by day, and do what you can to ensure that you put enough nutrients in your body to keep that vital resource in the best possible condition. Another thing I had to do was to slow myself right down. Sometimes, when you are hungry, havent been sleeping right (for lots of reasons, including but in no way limited to the quality of your sleeping area), and have no security, it can make your mind race. You can sometimes feel like you arent doing enough to change things. What you have to realise is that sometimes, things are just messed up, and the only thing you can do is ride the wave.

Oh sure, walk around town all damned day, every damned day, delivering your curriculum vitae (or resume, for those who dont accept that you ought to speak a language the way its originators do, just to simplify matters (kidding, so shh)), bust your butt trying to find work in every place you can think of. Thats just what you do. But remember also that looking for work is actually more draining, more tiring, both mentally and physically, than actually doing most jobs that are available these days. The uncertainty of a positive result makes the psychological drain the most damaging, so you have to make sure that you take a day to just collapse and slow yourself down. I was walking about 20 kilometres per day when I was handing my CV out to prospective employers, just to give you some perspective, a comparison with a normal days work.

For me, I found that meditation, sitting on the beach as the sun came up, or went down, watching storm clouds roll across the sea, just letting go and absorbing a natural sensation, reminding myself that I was connected to the universe in some way, were all very helpful. Peace can be a cooling balm in the heat of such times. You also need to stay connected with people who care about you.

Most important of all though, is you may need to consider modifying your expectations somewhat. I am not talking about taking a really piss poor job, just because it is there (although if that is what you want to do, then you ought to go ahead). What I mean is, you cannot set yourself targets, like "I expect to be employed by X and then when I have been there for Y months I will have saved enough to rent a dwelling....".

Right now, if I were you, I would be expecting nothing what so ever, and being OK with that. If you rage against the situation (which remember, you cannot do anything about) you will end up ulcerating your own stomach and causing yourself all manner of horrid internal problems, not least psychological issues long term. You need to remember that at the thin end of the wedge, it is all about being able to roll with the punches, ride the wave, be prepared to be nothing but dust in the wind for a while. I guess boiled down, you have no power to change your position, and you have to learn not to mind that. The consequences of having a problem with that state of affairs are unplesant, and do not solve the issue.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by HauntWok
 

People must really be in dire straits for employment and money out there.

I'm going to have to do a thread on making money at a flea market.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by HauntWok
 

People must really be in dire straits for employment and money out there.

I'm going to have to do a thread on making money at a flea market.


You should. I'd read it.
And it might help people scrounge up a little extra cash.
I used to go Flea Marketing, and to yards sales years ago.
Actually did pick up a few cool and usable things. But now, I am overwhelmed with stuff.
My stuff, Other people's (can i store this in your garage?) stuff. Stuff that we inherited.
I don't need all this stuff!
edit on 5-7-2013 by spacedoubt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by spacedoubt
 


But now, I am overwhelmed with stuff.
My stuff, Other people's (can i store this in your garage?) stuff. Stuff that we inherited.
I don't need all this stuff!

You just described every other garage in America. Thats why I think people can use a few tips on how to move it. Thanks for supporting an idea.

Next one I hit I will take pics and do it up.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:18 AM
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Don't get used to thinking you're out of work. It's hard to get a job without a job. Get temp work or even get your own business license and say you're in a certain line of work that seems out of reach but it's on your dream list and you have a skill for it. Open up your schedule to any kind of work. Never let yourself watch TV or hover on the Internet. Pretend you're an actor and you're looking for auditions, every day, so keep up being nice to everybody and have materials ready at all times for anybody. It's easier to do that in the city than the country, as long as you have exposure to people who could hire you.

See maybe you have the mindset that you'll be hired ...in a few days. Well that's too lax, you want a job in the next 24 hours. Act like you expect to get one in 24 hours or less.



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