Seventy-two killed resisting gun confiscation in Boston!

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posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by stormcell

Originally posted by TrueAmerican
At first they were just mad. They petitioned the crown and even sent an envoy.

Nothing. Just arrogance and continued oppression derived from the illusion that their standing army could beat us. They were going to shove those new taxes down our throats no matter what, even if they had to kill us for them.

It matters not that the oppressors found themselves in graves back in Britain. Cause death doesn't care where you're buried.

I wonder how the British people feel about those that died trying to enforce tyranny? Probably the same I feel for Americans that die trying to enforce "freedom". They are all just pawns of the corrupt wills of evil, cowardly men that will gladly send others to their deaths over money.

Scum. You hear me? SCUM.



Across Europe, they commemorate D-Day and the victory against the invaders. France respects their dead three times a year. Graveyards mark all those who died during the war, with a gravestone in the shape of a sword and curly handle.

We remember the "Highland Clearances". Imagine being evicted from your, your possessions thrown outside and your home set fire to and burned to the ground. All so that some wealthy businessman in London could make a fast profit from wool production. Your only options are to take a horse and cart 50 miles along a country road, and either build your own home, join the army of the British Empire or emigrate to a foreign land.

cranntara.org.uk...




posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:50 PM
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They called the Revolutionaries "extremists"? I didn't think that was in the lexicon back then. Sounds more like a current political thing.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 12:58 PM
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What more do you need to see??




Wake up, folks. Wake up.

edit on 6-7-2013 by XxNightAngelusxX because: cause stupid



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:02 PM
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Originally posted by bekod
If one knows their history , there is no difference of now and then, TAX laws and weapons laws are the same , so too is the land laws and land laws, one could not tell other than 1776 and 2013 oh and we are not under a Tyrants rule that orders red Coats around , but one that has NSA under every ones bed, door, closet, window, and desk. We do not have tax with representation just tax upon tax up on tax.

Sounds about right. And also we have tax people rifling through our stuff now and fining us for not buying insurance, red light cameras, surveillance cameras everywhere and biometrics, and TSA groping us at airports, chemicals in the food and clothing(GMO, flourides, etc) psyops, controlled mass media, the war on drugs, Agenda 21 and Common Core with indoctrination, and stupid wars we don't agree with. Is there any difference between a King who declares war on some nation and taxes the people, or a democratically elected Congress and President who tax us and go to ridiculous wars that do not get won and just spend a lot of money and most people don't even know what it was for....

A little overwhelming eh?



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 




Seventy-two killed resisting gun confiscation in Boston!


One really has to appreciate the approach here... attention is demanded and even when the OP clarifies that it is history, it still carries so much weight!

Hat tip to TrueAmerican for the presentation!


The question then becomes... who are we? How do we relate to those who built the nation and the rights we now not only enjoy, but so often take for granted?

Are we loyal to His Majesty? Will we allow the King's soldiers to be quartered in our homes? If we are good subjects, we should not fear His Majesty or His troops.

This comes around...

If we have nothing to hide, we shouldn't mind our homes and automobiles being searched. If we are loyal to the federal government, we shouldn't oppose having our words sniffed and scoured by any number of alphabet agencies.

Our nation has changed. The end of the Cold War saw sudden and undeniable skews applied to systems and establishments that has since seen our industrial plant leave our country and our economy become almost wholly dependent on consumers. Our culture is being diluted by throwing open our borders... leaving Americans of any ethnicity almost in a state of minority.

Should we do as those in other nations and riot? Do we attack and burn cars and buses and act like maniacs? Or do we try and find a means to hold trust in those systems of voting that have always served us? Or can we find a place in-between where we speak as one nation and demand it back to us?

It is a worthy question.

S&F



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


You got me for a time there with the OP, I was so hopeful that finally American regular citizens, regular people like you and me were finally waking up to what is going in on in the nation putting a fight, but sadly is not to be.

In todays under the antipatriot act crap this will be call an act of terrorism and citizens would have los their constitutional rights.

The crocks has cover their tracks very well with corrupted laws. . .



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


What a noxiously fabricated little piece this is. Honestly, it was utterly geared to basically dupe people under the cushion of vitriolic satire protecting it. There was no "National Guard" in the US in the 18th Century. There were British troops but no National Guard. However, using the term "British Troops" would have dated the piece immediately. Furthermore, it wasn't until 1789 in France that the terms "left" and "right" appeared representing supporters of the monarch and supporters of revolution. Such an idea or term did not exist in 1775 at the time that this event originally occurred. So really, in a historical context, this bit of "satire" is actually very revisionist and utterly used to deliberately tweak the noses of those who would most likely panic at the thought.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 03:50 PM
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Only difference between then and now is that the king lives closer.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


It's sad that you don't understand the point of using more modern terms in the telling of the story. I'm not trying to be a jerk but it is sad.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by fenson76
 


I agree, that's the whole issue about using modern and the old to make a point, same situation different times, but actually nothing much will change, just some laws to protect the corruption and to pushing the anarchist in today's world is "domestic terrorist".




posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by fenson76
 


You might find it sad that I hold my point of view but I frankly find it sad that you think my opinion of it sad. I will never be a fan of shoddy satire created in such a manner that risks duping the public into believing that this is something that is actually a current event or the misalignment of terms that basically risks creating a revisionist view of history. I also find it very sad that society has a tendency to not finish reading articles all the way to the end for the "punch line" because, if you didn't notice, some people actually thought this occurred because they didn't finish reading the article. While I am a history buff and a total fan of good satire and a sharp criticism of government, I'll never be a fan of anything that deliberately tries to incite panic from a reader without any actual foundation. Then again, I also find it pretty sad that the Tea Party actually thinks that "taxation without representation" in its prior historic use has any comparison to them. The only US citizens that could actually have a comparable claim of "taxation without representation" would be those living in Washington, DC. For all others in the US, they have the opportunity to actually be represented democratically within our version of Parliament through the vote while, back in the late 18th century, the colonists were not allowed any sort of representation within the Parliament and were having hefty taxes levied upon them by Parliament in order to pay for the French/Indian War.

But hey, I suppose history is how you spin it in your book.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by WhiteAlice
reply to post by fenson76
 


You might find it sad that I hold my point of view but I frankly find it sad that you think my opinion of it sad. I will never be a fan of shoddy satire created in such a manner that risks duping the public into believing that this is something that is actually a current event or the misalignment of terms that basically risks creating a revisionist view of history. I also find it very sad that society has a tendency to not finish reading articles all the way to the end for the "punch line" because, if you didn't notice, some people actually thought this occurred because they didn't finish reading the article. While I am a history buff and a total fan of good satire and a sharp criticism of government, I'll never be a fan of anything that deliberately tries to incite panic from a reader without any actual foundation. Then again, I also find it pretty sad that the Tea Party actually thinks that "taxation without representation" in its prior historic use has any comparison to them. The only US citizens that could actually have a comparable claim of "taxation without representation" would be those living in Washington, DC. For all others in the US, they have the opportunity to actually be represented democratically within our version of Parliament through the vote while, back in the late 18th century, the colonists were not allowed any sort of representation within the Parliament and were having hefty taxes levied upon them by Parliament in order to pay for the French/Indian War.

But hey, I suppose history is how you spin it in your book.


Still sad but thanks for your opinion on my opinion. Cheers



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by WhiteAlice
The only US citizens that could actually have a comparable claim of "taxation without representation" would be those living in Washington, DC. For all others in the US, they have the opportunity to actually be represented democratically within our version of Parliament through the vote...


*loud buzzer sounds* Eh, thanks, but stop right there. :shk:

If enough of the electronic voting machines are hacked, we effectively have no representation. Clinton Curtis's testimony is just one minor example of this systemic robbery.

*newbies*

*sigh*

Give em some time...they'll learn.



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


No duping, once the reader get to understand the whole OP meaning they will get the point, scaremongering? no, no that either, actually for me, it kind of raised hope for just a bit that Americas were actually waking up.

But as usual everybody is entitle to their opinions and views and that is fine not problem there.




posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 11:29 PM
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You had me going for a minute. I was about to head to the Google machine to find this news article, until I finished the Op.

Good Thread, TrueAmerican! Very thought provoking.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by Ghost375
 
I for one would not call a 75cal 325gram lead ball , powered by 125 gr of 2ff a pea shooter ok some did have a 36 cal coon rifle or a 50 cal mountain rifle, but most had the 69 cal or the 75 smoothbore flintlock musket far from a peashooter.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 12:59 AM
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Is this for real? I searched this and couldn't find any 'reputable' news sites talking about it?



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 01:12 AM
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reply to post by TheIceQueen
 


Did you read the entire post?



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 01:57 AM
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I reread it and some replies.. So I guess that it was supposed to be a joke or something?



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 02:41 AM
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reply to post by TheIceQueen
 
No joke, just a bit of history, look up the revolutionary war, the history of Lexington and Concord. how the revolutionary war of the US got started, this is just one part of a big story, one that a few know or care to know.





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