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The Massive Protests are Pro-Morsi not Vice-versa

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posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 03:39 PM
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Originally posted by Deetermined
reply to post by Misbah
 



Now for me I think what the army did was seriously wrong, you can't simply kick a government that was democratically elected by the people.


That's what happens when a leader is democratically elected based on nothing but lies and deceit.

Too bad officials in our country (America) aren't looking out for us in the same way your military is looking out for you. It's not like your military didn't give Morsi a chance. They tried to work with him and he refused.



Then how come most of the European elections and American or Russian aren't overthrown? Do you really think that they were not based on lies? Do you want me to count the amount of lies Obama made or Putin made or some of the European parties before being elected?

Now you're telling me that Morsi was overthrown because his election was based on nothing but lies and deceit? Forgive me but if the majority elected him and the laws he introduced. How is that a deceit or a lie? It's not like he chose it himself, the people did. I think you've misunderstood what was happened. Everything Morsi did was the will of the people.

Edit: I'm not from Egypt, I'm from Europe. But I'm with Morsi and his supporters. They were elected fairly by the people, there were no reason to overthrow him. The only reason it happened was because the anti-Morsi propaganda was fed by foreign agents including Mubarak and his followers. That's why Ahmed Shafiq (ran for president with Morsi) fled the country.
edit on 3-7-2013 by Misbah because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 03:57 PM
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Can I just say, Wow!?

OP, there is a reason that this thread hasn't been flagged and your post don't get stars.

I'm just amazed by some people.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by Misbah
 


Morsi didn't deliver on his campaign promises. He promised to work with everyone and then he only tried to over rule and control them and hand pick his own people to work with him. He was starting to do everything he said he was not going to do. That's why they threw him out.

As for America, the real truth is that our elected officials have so much dirt on each other they're afraid to be the first one to point their finger at the other, including the President, for fear of retaliation. Nothing gets done here.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 04:16 PM
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Originally posted by IndieA
Can I just say, Wow!?

OP, there is a reason that this thread hasn't been flagged and your post don't get stars.

I'm just amazed by some people.


Does something have to be popular in order to be true in your world?

No wonder the world's in the shape it is. The truth is often painful. Its just as often rejected.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by Deetermined
reply to post by Misbah
 


Morsi didn't deliver on his campaign promises. He promised to work with everyone and then he only tried to over rule and control them and hand pick his own people to work with him. He was starting to do everything he said he was not going to do. That's why they threw him out.

As for America, the real truth is that our elected officials have so much dirt on each other they're afraid to be the first one to point their finger at the other, including the President, for fear of retaliation. Nothing gets done here.



I will agree with you that he didn't deliver on his campaign promises, but its worse than that.


Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi announced on Saturday the “definitive” cutting of ties with the regime of President Bashar al-Assad and called for imposing a no-fly zone over the warn-torn country.

Egypt “decided today to definitively break off relations with the current regime in Syria, to close that regime's embassy in Cairo and to recall Egypt's charge d'affaires,” President Morsi said at a rally in Cairo on Saturday.

The “Support for Syria” rally was organized in Cairo and came a day after the Muslim Brotherhood denounced Hezbollah’s military intervention in Syria and backed calls for Jihad (holy war) there.

Sunni Muslim clerics had gathered in Cairo early this week urging the Muslim youth to go and fight in Syria against the Shiite Hezbollah and Iran.

In his speech on Saturday, Morsi also urged world powers not to hesitate to enforce a no-fly zone over Syria.

www.albawaba.com...

Was this inexplicable speech, which incited even more hostility between Sunni and Shiite, the real cause and effect of the uprising? That's what I'd like to know and the answer seems to be buried somewhere between the lines of western versions of the story if not completely redacted from their reports.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by Misbah
 


So, you are pro-Morsi, and your source is an Arabic news source, which makes it quite hypocritical for you to blast us for getting our information from western news.

Perhaps you are unaware of Morsi's power grabs since being elected? He's no shining apple.

Also, you can pay lip service to the holiness and righteousness of Sharia Law, but all that seems to come from it is intolerance and oppression. I'm just calling things as I see them.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by frazzle
 


Yes.

Even though protests have been going on for months, I heard Morsi's speech over Syria was the "tipping point".



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 05:49 PM
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Originally posted by Deetermined
reply to post by frazzle
 


Yes.

Even though protests have been going on for months, I heard Morsi's speech over Syria was the "tipping point".


That's what I thought and see, there's always that tipping point.

Not to go off topic but reflect back on the tea party protests and occupy protests in the US and how they were hushed and shut down and now the ever stronger push to eliminate whatever it was US voters believed BO would do to keep his promises and you can't help but wonder what our tipping will be. Guaranteed there will be one. But instead of paying attention to what's going on here at home we're all distracted thinking we can "fix" Egypt and Syria and the rest of them. We can't even fix ourselves.



edit on 3-7-2013 by frazzle because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by frazzle
 


You're right, it will be interesting to see what our tipping point will be.

I'd like to think that a worldwide financial collapse would help take care of it for us, but that would create new problems too.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 06:37 PM
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Originally posted by Deetermined
reply to post by frazzle
 


You're right, it will be interesting to see what our tipping point will be.

I'd like to think that a worldwide financial collapse would help take care of it for us, but that would create new problems too.


I really don't think a financial collapse would cause all that many problems for the people of the west, most will buckle under to their new overlords without so much as a whimper. Actually, for all intents and purposes, that has already happened as far as the global bookkeepers are concerned. Skip being consumers or taxpayers, we are now carbon footprints. Under someone's boot.

But back to the middle east. Maybe that's what's so fascinating to so many people who eagerly watch these huge crowds in other countries out in the streets demanding change and defying the blood and pain involved. I suppose its a form of voyeurism because at least none of the westerners I know could imagine personally acting so uncivilized in public or risking a broken fingernail.

It'll take something ridiculous like the "wrong" decision in the Zimmerman trial to get people who don't give a damn about what some stranger thinks of them to get out on the street like the Egyptians. It'll also take something like that for the somebodies wearing the boot to finally come clean about what they really think of us ~ that there are too many of us taking up their space and using their stuff.

jmo



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:26 PM
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reply to post by frazzle
 


It's more inspiring and hope provoking, than fascinating, to see people stand up to injustices within their governments and demand to have a say in their rights.

I like seeing slaves free themselves from the bondage that is forced by the elite. Maybe one day we can have a middle class again. Maybe one day we will have sound money again.
edit on 3-7-2013 by IndieA because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:04 PM
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This isn't good, our ambassador to Egypt sounds like an idiot, what is she going to do next? Influence the new govt? I hope we stay out of it, completely! But based on our recent history with Egypt it looks warped.......

Source: frontpagemag.com...


While that may be expected, more troubling is that the U.S. ambassador to Egypt is also trying to prevent Egyptians from protesting—including the Copts. The June 18th edition of Sadi al-Balad reports that lawyer Ramses Naggar, the Coptic Church’s legal counsel, said that during Patterson’s June 17 meeting with Pope Tawadros, she “asked him to urge the Copts not to participate” in the demonstrations against Morsi and the Brotherhood.

The Pope politely informed her that his spiritual authority over the Copts does not extend to political matters.

Regardless, many Egyptian activists are condemning Patterson for flagrantly behaving like the Muslim Brotherhood’s stooge. Leading opposition activist Shady el-Ghazali Harb said Patterson showed “blatant bias” in favor of Morsi and the Brotherhood, adding that her remarks had earned the U.S. administration “the enmity of the Egyptian people.” Coptic activists like George Ishaq openly told Patterson to “shut up and mind your own business.” And Christian business tycoon Naguib Sawiris—no stranger to Islamist hostility—posted a message on his Twitter account addressed to the ambassador saying “Bless us with your silence.”


What’s worse is that the human rights abuses Egypt’s Coptic Christians have been suffering under Muslim Brotherhood rule are significantly worse than the human rights abuses that the average Egyptian suffered under Mubarak—making the Copts’ right to protest even more legitimate, and, if anything, more worthy of U.S support.

Among other things, under Morsi’s rule, the persecution of Copts has practically been legalized, as unprecedented numbers of Christians—men, women, and children—have been arrested, often receiving more than double the maximum prison sentence, under the accusation that they “blasphemed” Islam and/or its prophet. It was also under Morsi’s reign that another unprecedented scandal occurred: the St. Mark Cathedral—holiest site of Coptic Christianity and headquarters to the Pope Tawadros himself—was besieged in broad daylight by Islamic rioters. When security came, they too joined in the attack on the cathedral. And the targeting of Christian children—for abduction, ransom, rape, and/or forced conversion—has also reached unprecedented levels under Morsi.

Evidently our politicians are so full of themselves they actually believe they know all the answers for every country, every person in the world. Its gotten out of hand folks, their center point is off by a mile. Wasn't there a study that came out recently about most politicians being essentially a psychopath or sociopath? Oh yeah, here it is:

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com...

"I think you would find no expert in the field of sociopathy/psychopathy/antisocial personality disorder who would dispute this," Stout continued. "That a small minority of human beings literally have no conscience was and is a bitter pill for our society to swallow -- but it does explain a great many things, shamelessly deceitful political behavior being one."


What are they going to do next? Lord help us! Get ready people! Who's next?

STM
edit on 7/3/2013 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:25 PM
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Originally posted by IndieA
reply to post by frazzle
 


It's more inspiring and hope provoking, than fascinating, to see people stand up to injustices within their governments and demand to have a say in their rights.

I like seeing slaves free themselves from the bondage that is forced by the elite. Maybe one day we can have a middle class again. Maybe one day we will have sound money again.
edit on 3-7-2013 by IndieA because: (no reason given)


Hold on, the fat Egyptian lady hasn't sung quite yet. The only ones who have a say in anything right now is the military and we don't know what ties the military has with the elite. Matter of fact, we don't even know if the information and news we're getting is factual ~ it seldom is.

As for us, we won't have sound money as long as we keep going along like pack mules doing business with unsound money. Don't like something? Stop doing it.



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