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The Planets! They're all different!

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posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 04:08 AM
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Another important thing to note, which is covered somewhat in the videos but you may as well have this too:


Supernova nucleosynthesis is the production of new chemical elements inside supernovae. It occurs primarily due to explosive nucleosynthesis during explosive oxygen burning and silicon burning.[1]

Those fusion reactions create the elements silicon, sulfur, chlorine, argon, sodium, potassium, calcium, scandium, titanium and iron peak elements: vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel.

As a result of their ejection from supernovae, their abundances increase within the interstellar medium. Elements heavier than nickel are created primarily by a rapid capture of neutrons in a process called the R-process.

However, there are other processes thought to be responsible for some of the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements, notably a proton capture process known as the Rp-process and a photodisintegration process known as the gamma (or p) process. The latter synthesizes the lightest, most neutron-poor, isotopes of the heavy elements.


Supernova_nucleosynthesis

Simply googling that name will give you a ton of information to go through. (no pun intended).




posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:52 AM
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I would say it's because they are in different stages of planetary evolution based on the distance from the sun and the forces acting upon them. How hot was the sun billions of years ago? Was it just right for Mars but too hot for earth at one point? It once had a pretty good atmosphere and oceans... I don't see how understanding the composition of planets have anything to do with religion unless science and astronomy are your religion or it specifically incorporated into one.

There are planets similar in compositions, so they are not all different except in our own solar system, though some moons share some of the same qualities... and that's because of their main elementary compositions and distance from the sun and forces acting on them. Mercury cannot be like Neptune because they are being acted on by different levels of heat and gravity... Yet you can find similar planets in other other solar systems, based on heat and location relative to the star they orbit. You will find earth like planets in the Goldie Locks zones, etc.

Make sense?
edit on 3-7-2013 by BigBrotherDarkness because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:02 AM
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Actually jigger, if your looking for some similarities...

Uranus and Neptune are very similar in composition. They're considered "sister" planets and known as the ice giants.

Both are composed of helium, hydrogen, and liquid water mixed with ammonia. And it's theorized that they both have earth-sized hard rock/metal cores surrounded by a molten layer. Their atmospheres are also very similar in both gas make-up and temperatures (which is weird if you think about their different distances from the sun) with high amounts of methane giving them their bluish coloured hues.

Believe it or not, both planets have rings around them like Saturn (just not as heavily concentrated as Saturn's). But Neptune's rings are a lot harder to see without a super powerful telescope.

The reason why they look "different" is because of Neptune's wind velocities and cloud/storm formations most likely due to it's further distance from the sun than Uranus and the rotational differences. Neptune has more violent storms going on in its atmosphere than Uranus does. And Uranus is tilted on its side, while Neptune's axial rotation is more like Earth's. So their different sun exposures might also be a factor to the reason why their atmospheres don't function or look the same way.



So there you have it. At least two planets that are very very similar to one another, just slight differences in what's going on with their atmospheres, and thus they "look" slightly different from an outside viewpoint.




posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 





I just don't know why all the planets look different from one another. Why should they?



Wait until you realize people,

man will your mind be blown then.





Tell me that there's a sound reason for the differences, and then explain them.



why not pick up a book or find a YouTube vid with the info to get you started and then you cross check info and get verification or at least verification from multiple sources saying the same thing.

What your asking for is widely available.

I see Boncho has stood up to the plate and hit a home run



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by VoidHawk
Where did they get their atmospheres from?


"Atmospheres 'r Us"

Second star on the left and straight on til morning.

I'm glad all our planets (all planets) are different. Be real boring deciding which one to shoot rockets at next.....eenie-meenie-mynie-mo...
edit on 3/7/2013 by nerbot because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 07:43 PM
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Originally posted by nerbot

Originally posted by VoidHawk
Where did they get their atmospheres from?


"Atmospheres 'r Us"

Second star on the left and straight on til morning.

I'm glad all our planets (all planets) are different. Be real boring deciding which one to shoot rockets at next.....eenie-meenie-mynie-mo...
edit on 3/7/2013 by nerbot because: (no reason given)


...catch a
you cant say that any more!



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 07:54 PM
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you SHOULD NOT be asking or wondering about this... it is sacred, forbidden to ask of such things!!
Delete this.. do not go any further!



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 07:55 PM
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Originally posted by jiggerj

Originally posted by Idonthaveabeard
All a bit nut jobby for me.


Oh, I admit my mind has been screaming those same sentiments, but I can't get past the why of it? Why aren't there two planets that look alike? Three? Five? Why aren't they all made of the same stuff (all rock, all iron, all ice)?

Tell me that there's a sound reason for the differences, and then explain them.



Why isn't an electron a proton? They're just different..



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by InhaleExhale
 





why not pick up a book or find a YouTube vid with the info to get you started and then you cross check info and get verification or at least verification from multiple sources saying the same thing. What your asking for is widely available. I see Boncho has stood up to the plate and hit a home run


Because I come here to chat. Apparently so does Boncho. Why not pick up a book on the art of conversation instead of telling everyone to pick up a book?



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:22 PM
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Originally posted by libertytoall


Why isn't an electron a proton? They're just different..


Hmmm, are all electrons the same? Are all protons the same? I really don't know.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by jiggerj
As far as I know the story of the creation of our solar system is that it was a huge dust cloud from some explosion. So, we have a dust cloud where most of the hydrogen had collected over there to create a planet, and most of the iron went over there to create a planet? Does that sound right to you?
When you explain it like that it doesn't really make sense. I don't think the video boncho posted explained it too well either, though as it said some parts of the process aren't well understood. But I can certainly explain it better than that.

When the dust cloud formed, a proto-star formed in the center. The dust and gas around the star contained all kinds of materials. But what happened closer to the stars heat is that all the less dense stuff was burned away by the star. It's not that the denser stuff migrated there in particular, that's all that was left, kind of the charred remains of a broader range of materials if you will. And yes that model makes perfect sense to me, much more than your description which isn't really what happened.
edit on 3-7-2013 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:07 PM
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What do you mean different, have they found a triangular shaped planet?

Isn't every planet and star made up of the same elements, just in different proportions or some not present?



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:50 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by jiggerj
As far as I know the story of the creation of our solar system is that it was a huge dust cloud from some explosion. So, we have a dust cloud where most of the hydrogen had collected over there to create a planet, and most of the iron went over there to create a planet? Does that sound right to you?
When you explain it like that it doesn't really make sense. I don't think the video boncho posted explained it too well either, though as it said some parts of the process aren't well understood. But I can certainly explain it better than that.

When the dust cloud formed, a proto-star formed in the center. The dust and gas around the star contained all kinds of materials. But what happened closer to the stars heat is that all the less dense stuff was burned away by the star. It's not that the denser stuff migrated there in particular, that's all that was left, kind of the charred remains of a broader range of materials if you will. And yes that model makes perfect sense to me, much more than your description which isn't really what happened.
edit on 3-7-2013 by Arbitrageur because: clarification


By your reply, and the replies of others, I'm beginning to think that the rarity would be if all planets looked the same. After all, I've never heard it said that when a sun went supernova and exploded it didn't distribute the elements evenly. So, the variations in the planets is a very natural occurrence,

Good chat, everyone.



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 02:22 AM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


They are different because their composition is different. Uranus and Neptune are very similar and look very similar.
edit on 4-7-2013 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by jiggerj
 


They are different because their composition is different. Uranus and Neptune are very similar and look very similar.
edit on 4-7-2013 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)


The images I posted don't look alike at all.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 07:15 PM
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Distance from the Sun, and mass, are primary factors. Those two (along with some other factors) determine the atmosphere (or lack of thereof), and there you have the overall appearance of the planet.

Near the Sun, it's too hot for expansive hydrogen and helium atmospheres that the gas giants have, so what we have is rocky planets.

Strip the atmosphere off Venus, and it will probably look very similar to Mercury.

Mars isn't that different to some deserts on Earth; had we lost our magnetic field a few billion years ago we'd probably look like Mars too.



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Not all of those are planets bro!



posted on Jul, 6 2013 @ 05:37 AM
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Originally posted by tooo many pills
reply to post by jiggerj
 


Not all of those are planets bro!


I got the memo on Pluto, but I kept it in because I couldn't find images for the other two planets. Nibiru and Planet Hollywood.






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