Virginia girl arrested for buying sparkling water

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posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 07:56 AM
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The U.S. and the world needs a complete paradigm shift - self governing is the only answer.




posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by Argyll
reply to post by Hushabye
 


The thread (and source) title is a little misleading and sensational to be honest.

From your source:


“Other agents did not join the incident until the subject refused to cooperate,” the ABC said in a statement published by USA TODAY. “Rather than comply with the officers’ requests, the subject drove off, striking two officers. She was not arrested for possessing bottled water, but for running from police and striking two of them with a vehicle.”


I know it's the norm around here to hammer the police, but remember there are two sides to every story.


The problem is, with all of the rapes and assaults against young women, her reaction to leave when confronted by un-uniformed and poorly ID'ed men was a very logical and reasonable one.

I don't see much PC for the stop either.

Simply wanted to chat up a pretty girl?

Whatever happened to, in a conversational tone, "Excuse me, but I'm officer so and so and here is my clearly readable photo ID I'd like to ask you a question?"



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by DirtyLiberalHippie

The ABC defended the charges, arguing that the girl’s response was illegal and inappropriate.


Really now? Who's actions were more inappropriate here?

That said, I was under the impression that by law, if you doubt a person is really a LEO that you have the right to not stop until you get some one involved that you are sure is a LEO....

This article just leaves me feeling angry, confused and wanting answers.... If these charges stick then.... Well, I can't say I will be surprised...Just a little more disappointed in society than I was before....


This is true. Even police tell young women if they are confronted by a man they think might not be a LEO or tried to pull over by someone suspicious, proceed to the nearest station or uniformed LEO to sort things out. Women have been raped by being pulled over by fake cops.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:20 AM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwaters
reply to post by Gazrok
 





It's a class 1 misdemeanor.... That kind of response is highly unnecessary.


I'm Canadian. When I was 14 I was your typical little 14 year old. Got busted with a bunch of friends for drinking underage, had a couple of beers and some whiskey no one was even drunk yet. Cops come, and I mean half of the cops in the town, chasing kids down into the woods, and what happens? What was the appropriate response for a call of a handfull of teens with a case of beer?

I was arressted at gunpoint. That's right, I got to stare down the barrel of a cops handgun because I stole a few beer from my dad. Right in my face, like something from a cop show, it was quite surreal at the time. They even handcuffed some of us before giving us an 84$ fine.

84$ fine, gun in the face of a 14 year old. This wasn't even a large city, it's a tiny little town with a crime-rate of about nothing unless you consider stealing garden gnomes and placing them across the street in someone elses's garden a killable offense.


When I was a kid, cops would pour out your beer and then tell your dad. Heck, they might not even tell your dad if they were in a good mood. Times have changed indeed.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:38 AM
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reply to post by Hushabye
 


You gotta wonder why one of the officers couldn't have wandered over casually, shown his or her badge and engaged the girl in a conversation. It would seem that a military assault style response would have been in order, and even then I really doubt it, if the girl had threatened the officer during the conversation. The whole situation could have been avoided by her just showing, if they had asked, that it was water and not beer.

What the hell has happened to common sense? To reason? Not present in this situation.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 09:23 AM
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ABC has arresting authority? It seems they need to go back to the liquor store where they belong, it is the grocery stores responsibility to check ID's not some random plain clothes ABCs guy in a parking lot jumping to conclusions.

Here; lemme break out my funny looking badge, order you around then try to break your windows out. Just cause someone gives you piece of brass doesn't mean everyone else should walk on tacks... especially when they really don't have the power or authority for doing that. I mean they are basically just cashiers with a badge right?



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by Trubl
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


The 12 pack wasn't even alcohol though? Yes I agree excessive action was defiantly unnecessary in this situation. The student walked out with a bag implying that she purchased all the items. Not like she ran out of the store franticly with a 24 pack of bud light on her shoulder.


Right... What she was carrying looked similar to beer, also sold in the same store. So in reality, she'd done nothing wrong and they stormed her like D-Day for absolutely no good reason whatsoever. I can sure see why she'd be in a mild panic or worse, knowing with absolute certainty she had done nothing wrong and this mob of yelling, armed and very pissed off men were trying to overtake and capture her.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by Hushabye
 


ABC defended the agents? What the heck! They're lucky I wasn't driving. Plain clothes officers improperly showing their badges and trying to break the glass of their car. They could of been anybody. I would of ran over as many as I could have.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 09:52 AM
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reply to post by NavyDoc
 




When I was a kid, cops would pour out your beer and then tell your dad. Heck, they might not even tell your dad if they were in a good mood. Times have changed indeed.


Well see, as I was informed later, they were told to make an example out of us, that's why they actually booked and fined us, they caught everyone, but only charged 3 of us. The mother of one of my friends who was charged knew one of the cops and he told her as such. They knew my dad as he was a bit of a local celebrity so it was a sure deal I was going to the station regardless.

But to this day, I simply can't fathom in that year, in that town, drawing a firearm at a kid, I just can't.

Anyways, I do think the woman in this situation responded accordingly, depending on the type of "strike" incident against the agents. She had no reason to believe they were actual police officers, plenty of women have been raped and even murdered because they were pulled over, or approached, by a criminal posing as a cop.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by smurfy
 


This would be a call for a drone attack. I think this is a plot to see responce to Martial Law if invoked.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by Argyll
reply to post by Hushabye
 


The thread (and source) title is a little misleading and sensational to be honest.

From your source:


“Other agents did not join the incident until the subject refused to cooperate,” the ABC said in a statement published by USA TODAY. “Rather than comply with the officers’ requests, the subject drove off, striking two officers. She was not arrested for possessing bottled water, but for running from police and striking two of them with a vehicle.”


I know it's the norm around here to hammer the police, but remember there are two sides to every story.




“Citizens may resist unlawful arrest to the point of taking an arresting officer's life if necessary.” Plummer v. State, 136 Ind. 306



“When a person, being without fault, is in a place where he has a right to be, is violently assaulted, he may, without retreating, repel by force, and if, in the reasonable exercise of his right of self defense, his assailant is killed, he is justified.” Runyan v. State, 57 Ind. 80; Miller v. State, 74 Ind. 1



“These principles apply as well to an officer attempting to make an arrest, who abuses his authority and transcends the bounds thereof by the use of unnecessary force and violence, as they do to a private individual who unlawfully uses such force and violence.” Jones v. State, 26 Tex. App. I; Beaverts v. State, 4 Tex. App. 1 75; Skidmore v. State, 43 Tex. 93, 903.



“Each person has the right to resist an unlawful arrest. In such a case, the person attempting the arrest stands in the position of a wrongdoer and may be resisted by the use of force, as in self- defense.” (State v. Mobley, 240 N.C. 476, 83 S.E. 2d 100)


edit on 3-7-2013 by Shimri because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:17 AM
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NavyDoc said: Women have been raped by being pulled over by fake cops.

When I was a kid, cops would pour out your beer and then tell your dad. Heck, they might not even tell your dad if they were in a good mood. Times have changed indeed.


Women have been raped by real police officers too, pulled over in out of the way places. I wouldn't even get out of my car if it were a real police officer, if it were in the middle of no where. I'd express to him that I am willing to drive to the next brightly lighted public place, and he can ask me any questions he may have.

I was caught on much worse than alcohol when I was a kid (in the 80s)...police just made me (or took me) home. No guns, no tyrant-lord-in-your-face aggression.




Shimri said:

“Citizens may resist unlawful arrest to the point of taking an arresting officer's life if necessary.” Plummer v. State, 136 Ind. 306

“When a person, being without fault, is in a place where he has a right to be, is violently assaulted, he may, without retreating, repel by force, and if, in the reasonable exercise of his right of self defense, his assailant is killed, he is justified.” Runyan v. State, 57 Ind. 80; Miller v. State, 74 Ind. 1



“These principles apply as well to an officer attempting to make an arrest, who abuses his authority and transcends the bounds thereof by the use of unnecessary force and violence, as they do to a private individual who unlawfully uses such force and violence.” Jones v. State, 26 Tex. App. I; Beaverts v. State, 4 Tex. App. 1 75; Skidmore v. State, 43 Tex. 93, 903.



“Each person has the right to resist an unlawful arrest. In such a case, the person attempting the arrest stands in the position of a wrongdoer and may be resisted by the use of force, as in self- defense.” (State v. Mobley, 240 N.C. 476, 83 S.E. 2d 100)


It's about time people started studying relevant precedences set in past situations such as these, as they have become highly prevalent among normal citizens' interactions with police department officials.
edit on 3-7-2013 by Hushabye because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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Drop the charges, have the department offer the girls a written apology and cite the officers involved for inappropriate conduct. And throw eggs and rotten fruit at them.
And you people want to live in a police state so get used to this.
edit on 3-7-2013 by Dutchowl because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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I'll bet she pays more attention next time she's approached by police officers. Almost running down a cop is never a good way to make friends with them. For her sake, I hope it's a lesson learned - When the police want your attention, give it to them.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by TownCryer
 


Who says she actually "almost ran them down?" The cop? The ABC guys? We're supposed to think that these guys would tell the truth in the face of their over the top actions? Or would they say anything they had to in order to try and save face?

Methinks the latter.

Again- why should we believe anything they they say?



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by TownCryer
 


Oh, I'm sure she learned a lesson from this. It's the same lesson I take from it by just reading the reports of the incident.

When facing cops? Comply, Obey and Thank them for the opportunity to be abused and manhandled. Failure to do so may result in your physical harm, arrest or death.

I'd say the lesson is learned 100% clear. It's just a lesson we've had previous generations of Americans fight and die in far off lands to insure OUR CITIZENS would never HAVE to learn.


So much so all the sacrifice of generations past. It was to become, not overcome, what they fought.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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In Canada when you buy alcohol, if you look under 35 they will ask for your I.D every time to see if your over 19 years (legal drinking age in most provinces).

Do they not I.D people who buy alcohol and cigarettes in the States? If not, it should be implemented, instead of having these ABC enforcement officers terrorizing people by ganging up on them with guns, like some kind of thugs in a street gang.

I wanna know, how did they know she was under age in the first place?

I had a gang of SWAT officers (5 of them) pull me over at gun point in traffic while I was on my way to the DMV because my tag was expired. This was during the G20 bullcarp in Toronto. I was shaking and crying (but trying to hold it in) and they were making fun of me while they still held their rifles and shotguns up the whole time. I almost poo'd myself. I get terrified when I see officers in groups of more than 2.
edit on 3/7/2013 by InnerTruths because: sorry for swearing



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by InnerTruths
 


Most places are required to ID you regardless of how old you look. I've seen some clerks 'following the rules' asking obviously geriatric persons for their ID to buy cigarettes/alcohol.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 01:50 PM
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Common sense cannot be legislated. Gross negligence and comical incompetence cannot be "voted" out of existance.

The solution you're looking for, the only solution that will bring measurable results, is a little something called "wanton violence". There simply is no substitute. But let's all continue to pretend that isn't necessary



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by Hushabye
 





Who says she actually "almost ran them down?" The cop? The ABC guys? We're supposed to think that these guys would tell the truth in the face of their over the top actions? Or would they say anything they had to in order to try and save face? Methinks the latter. Again- why should we believe anything they they say?



But teenage girls always tell the truth.....don't they?





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