Over 30 Million Bees Found Dead In Elmwood Canada

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posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by wrkn4livn
 


Maybe they don't have to do anything but make themselves look like human companies and try to sway their plan / agenda that way. Maybe Monsanto and most of the other world's evils are " them we don't speak of " lol Best way to come and invade a planet, through their own means.

It's almost like ETs came here and ran for president in many countries and won, slowly invading congress and other offices swaying the ideals and agendas making the world slowly bend to their will..

What a movie concept if not anything else.
Let's get on it, I have a few more we can be the ATS movie screen writing crew, cut things, down the fractioned middle.




posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 12:06 PM
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What do you expect when you tamper with nature for a higher profit?

I can see it now. I can already see the commercials.

2033
"Over the last 20 years the honey bee population has been dropping at an increasing rate. Send in 20 dollars a month and your donation will help preserve and keep the honey bee from extinction. Brought to you by the Monsanto Corporation."



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by wrkn4livn
 

That quote keeps cropping up all over the Internet.....and as far as I have seen, there is no proof Einstein ever said it
www.snopes.com...



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by fluff007

Hi peeps...

Yet again there has been another huge dent in our bee-loved bee population. A man who runs a honey operation in Elmwood, Ontario, Canada has lost 600 hives...


About 37 million bees were found dead. Dave Schuit is blaming neonicotinoids.




Shortly after 50,000 bees were found dead in an Oregon parking lot (read more here), a staggering 37 million bees have been found dead in Elmwood, Ontario, Canada. Dave Schuit, who runs a honey operation in Elmwood has lost 600 hives. He is pointing the finger at the insecticides known as neonicotinoids, which are manufactured by Bayer CropScience Inc. This also comes after a recent report released by the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) that recorded its largest loss of honeybees ever. You can read more about that here. The European Union has stepped forward, having banned multiple pesticides that have been linked to killing millions of bees.

The loss comes after the planting of corn. Neonicotinoid pesticides are used to coat corn seed with air seeders. This results in having the pesticide dust blown into the air when planted. The death of millions of pollinators was studied by Purdue University. They discovered that Bees exhibited neurotoxic symptoms. They analyzed dead bees and found that traces of thiamethoxam/clothiandin were present in each case. The only major source of these compounds are seed treatments of field crops.


www.collective-evolution.com...

If we carry on continuing to turn away from the bees. We will suffer for it. And too right. We all know the neonicotinoids are one of the main problems. The other being the bizarre weather this year..

If you want to help the bees, Build them a bee hotel. Plant bee friendly flowers. Many of which are liked by butterflies and other insects aswell. Support your local honey suppliers. Do as best you can...!

Peace
Fluff



they are exterminating bees (butterflies are also disappearing as a side effect) so they could introduce robot-bees so they could take full control over farmings then start implementing agenda 21 where nobody could do farming and those will be allowed will be doing so by renting robot-bees (very expensive) from companies like Monsanto. their goal is to exterminate all bees so they could introduce robot-bees. i hope you enjoy your empty back and forth arguments over what's causing the bee colony collapse because you only listen to scientists paid off by these biotech companies.



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 04:18 PM
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Maybe we should breed them ourself in our gardens to strengthen the bee population?Sell bee queens on e-bay...?



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by fluff007
 


I seen a bee flying by and then he dropped straight down to the ground, dead. It was a very odd thing to see. It made me realize just how serious this problem is!



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 05:58 PM
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I'm not saying we're in the end times... but it's certainly not a GOOD sign is it.

Very sad.



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 08:40 PM
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I've been working hard to keep my garden fresh, and clean of all chemicals. I'm a vegetarian and i depend on these little fellas to supply me with honey, and to pollinate my plants. I regularly go to my local bee farm to buy good honey, as its a great source of natural sugars.

I live in a small town known as Chilliwack, inside of BC located a little east of Vancouver, Canada. Last few days all the farmers have been for some reason pouring, literally, chemicals all over their raspberry bushes,and other crops. I reported to the local health and awareness center as the smell and fumes just driving by were enough to force me to close my windows in the car. I've never seen it this bad here and this is one of the major farmlands of our province.. I hate to see our farmers turning away from organic growing.

Truly is a pain hearing so many helpful creatures lost their lives due to some greedy individuals. Something needs to be done, before it's to late, or perhaps it already is to late.

Now on a final note, i have taken a picture and posted it to some other threads with no response.. I have troubles distinguishing bee's. Could anyone try to inform of what kind of bee i have taken a photo of? As i can tell, there is a large abundance of these guys in my city. When i go to water my garden i clearly notice 5-10 almost immediately.




Oh before i leave i would like to add my own little bit of knowledge. I have no science backgrounds or big degrees, nor can i name half the plants i grow in my garden.. But these white little flowers that grow in the grass, i've noticed bees flock to these things in hordes. What is it that causes them to be so attracted to them? And is there any way i can perhaps aid in their growth?



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by darrin683
 


I was looking up bees today because I found some curled up and dead around my home (only about 10). They were not there about 1.5 hours prior, when i walked down my sidewalk. It was really strange since I use no pesticides at all. It looks like maybe a honey bee (has some fur) - your picture.

The confussion with the dead bees is they look really scrawny - not as robust as usual - fur maybe but caused me to have to recheck species. I saved a few as their faces looked flat or disfigured to me. I'm going to wait and see if anymore show up.

We don't need these pesticides - even if they aren't fully to blame. Here's what I told my kid today:

I was making a fruit salad today with organic stuff. While we were washing each piece my son asked me about some marks on it (should he throw it away). I told him it was from bugs - we would just cut that piece off. He said he thought that was gross. I said "would you rather eat something a bug chewed on or would you rather eat something a bug wont even taste. I then asked him if he would eat bug spray on his food. "No". Well bugs don't like it either so when we see they like it we know its probably safe.

We eat non organic too but wash it forever. I did not freak him out but rather wanted him to know bugs of all kinds can be pests but are our food testers. I get that pesticides make food last longer and make fruits bigger (but generally tasteless and hollow inside). I get that they stop crops from failing due to bug infestations but I've heard people say there are natural remedies. Why can't they use those?


Here is the link to three bee species.
www.google.com...=i%7C0%3Bd%7CI-FL8Y7nvg1Z-M%3A



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by Dianec
 


I had assumed they were honey bees. Now i feel the need to question what kind of pesticides farmers in my area are using.. But as a ordinary person do i hold any rights to ask such questions? With how many of these little happy creatures that are dieing i feel we need to start kicking it into high gear to help protect them.

Great job explaining pesticides vs organics to your child by the way. It's very important to get the point across to the new and upcoming generations. Bugs aren't only scary and ugly looking things, they are important for our daily lives to continue on as they have since time began.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 02:40 AM
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If ALL the bees die, then we die



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 03:19 AM
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WoW.. That is a staggering loss! If nothing else, at least he can have them tested and probably win a lawsuit. It won't help the bees though.

I agree- we've got to do whatever we can-- hopefully there will be enough people out there who know how to keep the real bees going until this madness can be stopped. I know it's a longshot but what else can we do?
I only saw 2 bees earlier this Spring and haven't noticed any since.... This is really getting scary.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 



I check Snopes.com often but never thought about checking this one.

Good catch.

Perhaps plants would continue. They are I think, one of the oldest forms of life on the planet.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 12:45 PM
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reply to post by darrin683
 


I am no expert but I am learning my bees slowly. I think that might be your average Honey Bee. Looks nearly identical to this one...



www.bbowt.org.uk...




posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 12:48 PM
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reply to post by Staroth
 


Wow I cannot say I have ever seen a bee drop dead like that..! So far I can report zero deaths of any bees where I live. But that is probably because there are no pesticides sprayed here. There are definitely fewer bees but I think that may bee because of the strange year of weather we have had this year..



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by fluff007
 


I think its clear now that all the bee dye offs are due to the pesticides. The pesticides have the full backing of the US government because the pesticide manufacturers have excellent lobbyists.

Thus the bee's will continue to die until some critical mass is reached at which point the politicians will come up with some BS plan to help the situation.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by darrin683
I've been working hard to keep my garden fresh, and clean of all chemicals. I'm a vegetarian and i depend on these little fellas to supply me with honey, and to pollinate my plants. I regularly go to my local bee farm to buy good honey, as its a great source of natural sugars.

I live in a small town known as Chilliwack, inside of BC located a little east of Vancouver, Canada. Last few days all the farmers have been for some reason pouring, literally, chemicals all over their raspberry bushes,and other crops. I reported to the local health and awareness center as the smell and fumes just driving by were enough to force me to close my windows in the car. I've never seen it this bad here and this is one of the major farmlands of our province.. I hate to see our farmers turning away from organic growing.

Truly is a pain hearing so many helpful creatures lost their lives due to some greedy individuals. Something needs to be done, before it's to late, or perhaps it already is to late.

Now on a final note, i have taken a picture and posted it to some other threads with no response.. I have troubles distinguishing bee's. Could anyone try to inform of what kind of bee i have taken a photo of? As i can tell, there is a large abundance of these guys in my city. When i go to water my garden i clearly notice 5-10 almost immediately.




Oh before i leave i would like to add my own little bit of knowledge. I have no science backgrounds or big degrees, nor can i name half the plants i grow in my garden.. But these white little flowers that grow in the grass, i've noticed bees flock to these things in hordes. What is it that causes them to be so attracted to them? And is there any way i can perhaps aid in their growth?


I've been doing some plant research since my last post. According to visiual data i've been collecting the last couple days i can openly say we have an abundance of honey bees in my neighbourhood. This is on the west side of canada.

The white flower in my photo is known as a "Trifolium repens, a white clover" also called, "dutch clover". Being curious as I was, I started looking more into these plants. I mean perhaps to someone more knowledgeable they would know that these are classified as weeds. I can't seem to wrap my mind around why you would want to rid your yard of these plants?

en.wikipedia.org...

It is considered to be a beneficial component of natural or organic lawn care due to its ability to fix nitrogen and out-compete lawn weeds. Natural nitrogen fixing reduces leaching from the soil and can reduce the incidence of some lawn diseases that are enhanced by the availability of synthetic fertilizer


www.honeytraveler.com...

Its use has decreased in the last 60 years as it has been replaced with nitrogen fertilizers and soybeans or alfalfa in farming; although it may show some resurgence with the growth of organic farming practices. It is a major source of nectar for what is considered one of the world’s finest honeys.


From what I've been learning is that these amazing little things can work wonders for your lawn. Why are they so widely thought of as, bad weeds that make your lawn less appealing. I understand the need for mowing the lawn to keep it at proper length. As such today i removed a section of my lawn about 1x2 feet and replanted it in my potted garden outback to see if i can continue to help them grow.

Im not sure if theres a science behind this or not, but the bees literally flock to these white clovers. Perhaps you other people who are trying to help support the bees should maybe try obtaining some seeds for these.

------

And sorry about my messy posting, i've never been good at this stuff.



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by darrin683
 


Yes, that is the kind of clover we have around here....and they are bee magnets...but I am wondering if that is really a bee or a wasp/hornet/yellowjacket kind of insect?
insects.about.com...

www.ehow.com...

www.thebeehunter.com...



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 08:03 PM
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IMO I don't believe anything else happening on this planet needs more attention than this disaster. Nothing should take precedence over trying to fix this problem, if we still can, and do everything we can to boost bee numbers. I rarely see bees these days, occasionally see bumble bees, don't even get many wasps annoying me any more, definitely no need for a wasp trap, yet the flies, let's just say they're around in plague proportions. Governments are only now starting to 'investigate' when action should have been taken 2 years ago at the very least, again too little, probably too late. I despair, I truly do



Irish beekeepers facing 'meltdown' as more than half of hives wiped out



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 08:30 PM
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reply to post by HighMaintenance
 


Everywhere you look bees are dieing. Yet the general public still acknowledges them as pests. Maybe a petition or something of the like should be started to ban, say exterminations of bees. We need some better way to spread info about what is going on. I've spoken to everyone i know the last fews days to start informing them about whats going on. Im trying to do my best up here, but it feels like it's almost meaningless. Just the other day i saw a kid stomp on a honeybee because they are "scary". Something needs to be done.





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