The Guardian Revealed A Major NSA 'Scoop' Then Deleted It From Their Website

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posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:37 AM
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The Guardian Revealed A Major NSA 'Scoop' Then Deleted It From Their Website


www.sfgate.com

The Guardian released another shocking NSA scoop on Saturday, revealing collusion and mass harvesting of personal communications among the United States and at least six European Union countries — only to delete it from their website hours after publication.

The article, titled "Revealed: secret European deals to hand over private data to America," was written by Jamie Doward, who reported information from Wayne Madsen, a former Navy Lt. and NSA employee for 12 years.

Doward wrote:

Madsen said the countries had "formal second and third party status" under signal intelligence (si
(visit the link for the full news article)


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posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:37 AM
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Wayne Madison is shaking up Merkel just before her election by exposing a WWII secret agreement that allows the NSA to spy on Europeans citizens. This breaks virtually all privacy laws in Germany which has some of the toughest laws in the world after suffering from both the Nazis and the Stazi. It directly conflicts with Merkel's statement that she is shocked with the NSA revelations. The Germans will wake up this morning to a new reality that the NSA will join this list.
Wayne, an ex NSA employee, has been a regular on Alex Jones. The information must have been so inflammatory that the Guardian has deleted the article! You can still see it in cache...

www.sfgate.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 30-6-2013 by R_Clark because: Grammar
edit on 30-6-2013 by R_Clark because: Grammar
edit on 30-6-2013 by R_Clark because: Grammar
edit on 30-6-2013 by R_Clark because: Grammar



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 02:46 AM
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These articles were under the radar in German media

Bundesnachrichtendienst -

Der Spiegel: Germany to expand Internet surveillance Date 16.06.2013

www.dw.de/der-spiegel-germany-to-expand-internet-surveillance/a-16885711

According to Der Spiegel, Germany's intelligence agency has a 100-million-euro plan to expand Internet surveillance. Meanwhile, the interior minister wants travelers to fill out a questionnaire before entering the EU.

Der Spiegel reported on Sunday that the Federal Intelligence Service plans to expand its Internet surveillance program to cover 20 percent of all communications between Germany and foreign countries.

Because of technical limitations, the intelligence agency - known by its German acronym, BND - currently only monitors 5 percent of all Internet and telephone communication. However, according to German law, the BND can snoop on a maximum 20 percent of all communications traffic.

The 100-million-euro ($133 million) expansion targets the BND's "technical reconnaissance" division, according to Der Spiegel. With the money, the agency wants to hire 100 new employees and expand its computer and server capacities, the weekly magazine reported.

(...)


Prism Revelation: EU Weakened Data Protection at US Request June 13, 2013 – 01:07 PM

www.spiegel.de/international/world/eu-weakened-data-protection-laws-ahead-of-prism-spy-program-a-905520.html

Top European officials are demanding more information about the controversial US Internet surveillance program known as Prism. But new information has revealed that the EU weakened privacy regulations in early 2012 following intense US lobbying.

Earlier this week, European Justice Commissioner Viviane Reding vented her fury over the US data spying program known as Prism. The far-reaching online surveillance operation, which saw the US National Security Agency spying on users across the globe, clearly demonstrates "that a clear legal framework for the protection of personal data is not a luxury, but is a fundamental right," Reding told SPIEGEL ONLINE on Tuesday.

Just two days later, however, it would seem that Reding was perhaps protesting a bit too much. According to both the Financial Times and Reuters, the European Commission bowed to US lobbying in early 2012 and scrapped a data protection measure that would have significantly reduced the NSA's ability to spy on Europeans.

According to the Financial Times report, which cites EU documents and unnamed EU officials, the measure was specifically designed to ward off US efforts to eavesdrop on international phone calls and emails. It was even called the "anti-FISA clause," a reference to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Washington, however, launched a significant lobbying effort to get the Commission to remove the clause -- which it then did, partly in order to smooth the way ahead of talks on the trans-Atlantic free trade agreement. "We didn't want any complications on this front," an EU official told the Financial Times.

(...)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 03:14 AM
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reply to post by R_Clark
 


I put the a thread up about the article before it was deleted last night.

Here is a link, there is a couple of screenshots of the first few paragraphs.

and here is a link to 'privacy surgeon' where you can read everything Wayne Madsen has to say on the topic.
edit on 30-6-2013 by Lady_Tuatha because: to add link



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 04:09 AM
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(edit: ok, nevermind. i'm done. lol. post removed.)












edit on 30-6-2013 by iunlimited491 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 05:42 AM
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Originally posted by R_Clark

The Guardian Revealed A Major NSA 'Scoop' Then Deleted It From Their Website



Some of Madsen's controversial views include the belief that President Obama is secretly a homosexual and that the Boston bombing suspects were government agents.

"this article has been taken down pending an investigation"



I'm not wishing for any censorship, but I do wish that more media would investigate their articles before publishing.
Its a stupid trend nowdays, that any old crap gets "reported" due to the media fear of not being first or exclusive.

Frankly, I'd rather they were CORRECT but a bit late, rather than WRONG but first with the story.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 06:44 AM
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I too posted on it www.abovetopsecret.com...

The reason they took ik down is that they did not consider Mr Madsen to be a credible/reliable source..
So this story is essentially en "non- story"



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 07:48 AM
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""The Guardian Revealed A Major NSA 'Scoop' Then Deleted It From Their Website""

Even though they deleted the story, they still got the point across.

Clever trick.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 08:07 AM
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This was reported MSM anyway, but there was little detail. Maybe from yesterday's thread it is possible to get the archived page.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 08:09 AM
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Originally posted by bowaconstricta
I too posted on it www.abovetopsecret.com...

The reason they took ik down is that they did not consider Mr Madsen to be a credible/reliable source..
So this story is essentially en "non- story"



What you REALLY mean is that the Guardian could not risk quoting a former NSA agent who claims that 911 and the Oklahoma City bombing, the Sandy Hook shootings and the Boston bombing were all inside jobs.

This is an example of the press quoting only what it wants you to believe.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by micpsi
 


Yeah.. I'm sure that's it. After all, we know they never ever get bad sources or bad stories. It's always because some nefarious plot in the background is at work to mold our minds and understanding of the world.

Of course... They're TPTB. They never make mistakes. :shk:

Any other media organizations we figure are too perfect to ever make a mistake or get suckered by a bad source? Maybe we need water walking tests before they hire on. Just to insure they are as perfect as some give them credit for being.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by micpsi

Originally posted by bowaconstricta
I too posted on it www.abovetopsecret.com...

The reason they took ik down is that they did not consider Mr Madsen to be a credible/reliable source..
So this story is essentially en "non- story"



What you REALLY mean is that the Guardian could not risk quoting a former NSA agent who claims that 911 and the Oklahoma City bombing, the Sandy Hook shootings and the Boston bombing were all inside jobs.

This is an example of the press quoting only what it wants you to believe.


It could be that, but what bowa' says could also be true. Madsen does make some outlandish claims, like Obama being a rubber boot, 'much nicht' But I don't get that the Guardian would make such an error, and that leans to your way of thinking.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:02 PM
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It was also in the Dutch news last night(Holland is 1 of the 6 counties) now they say also it has been removed from the Guardian website
nos.nl...
edit on 30-6-2013 by Demanto because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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Originally posted by micpsi

What you REALLY mean is that the Guardian could not risk quoting a former NSA agent who claims that 911 and the Oklahoma City bombing, the Sandy Hook shootings and the Boston bombing were all inside jobs.

This is an example of the press quoting only what it wants you to believe.


Nah, Madsen is sort of a whack job. That doesn't mean everything he says is nuts, but a lot of it is.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:10 PM
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Dont be rabbit trailed by some sites saying Madsen is the reason this was
taken down...it will be interesting to see what happens to him from here on...

Do however read the article, and from there one can take away info and leads
that are certainly reliable. If he was just spoofing, why are
the EU and Germany upset?

In any case, its looking spy against spy right now.
And to that end, a spy is a spy is a spy. Everyone does it,
and they have been doing it for decades. We did not need
a whistleblower to tell us. Makes one wonder what the hoopla
is all about.

There was one tidbit that was worth saving.



And the nations act shocked that they are being spied upon.
it is laughable.
edit on 30-6-2013 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:14 PM
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Everyone assumes we are being spied upon, but ya, once the cat is out of the bag and when the public is being told they are being spied on then the # hits the fan.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:17 PM
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First thing that pops into my head is that, if he working for the NSA from 1985 to 1997, how would he have firsthand knowledge of any current agreements as his own inside information would be stale. That said, it wouldn't surprise me. It seems that a lot of what goes on that is ethically sketchy tends to be worming around laws and utilizing loopholes through deliberate language or finding another alternative to do the same. In this case, an exchange of information about the respective citizens of each others' countries could be a loophole.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by MidnightTide
 


True, until the next season of dancing with the stars,
or NFL, or the latest verrson of Ios.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 





Everyone does it, and they have been doing it for decades. We did not need a whistleblower to tell us. Makes one wonder what the hoopla is all about.


Seriously as people were talking about other domestic issues before this now all they want to do is talk about spying.

Not the Spying of the DOJ, not the 'other scandals' it is complete tunnel vision that we have known for a long time even other government's knew about it in fact they were doing it for them.

History of Spying

Echelon



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:40 PM
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[SNIP]
edit on 1-7-2013 by Gemwolf because: Post removed due to copyright issues





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