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The record-breaking Nasa rocket that's run non-stop for five years and could be used in deep space

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posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 01:31 AM
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Just read this article about an ION engine that NASA has been running for over 5 years. 24/7/365... It broke the world record for a space propulsion system, continuously operating for five and a half years or more than 48,000 hours...



Nasa's advanced ion propulsion rocket engine has run continuously for over five and a half years, setting a new world record. This makes it the longest test duration any kind of space propulsion system demonstration project ever. The solar-electric propulsion thruster could be used in a wide range of science missions including intriguing journeys into deep space. The thruster is part of the space agency's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project at its Glenn Research Centre in Cleveland. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... e.html#ixzz2Xg40s87w Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... e.html#ixzz2Xg40s87w Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

I believe it was 100% full throttle the whole time, but maybe I'm mis-interpting it... It devoured 870 KG of something called a "xenon propellant"... Compared to ... "10,000 kilogrammes of conventional rocket propellant for the same use".



Source: Daily Mail Online

The xenon propellant is accelerated to speeds of up to 90,000 mph. They say it is not as powerful as a chemical rocket, however they are much more efficient... Perfect for deep space exploration..

This engine, and the new (radiation) deflector device being worked on in the UK would be a giant leap for deep space travel I hope..

Scientists product deflector device...

I wonder if you could build some extravagantly large ships with these engines... Could probably make some pretty comfortable living arrangement for a trip to Mars I'd bet...

edit on 30-6-2013 by ByteChanger because: (no reason given)
edit on 30-6-2013 by ByteChanger because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 02:28 AM
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Good find.

I always love the general lack of interest in things related to "real" space travel... Add UFO, or alien into your title and this would have already been a 6 page thread.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 02:42 AM
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I really wish the general populace had not lost their drive
for space exploration, i know not everyone has but it
would be awesome to see it like it was back in the hay
day for space exploration, what an exciting time it was.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 02:51 AM
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If I'm not mistaken this type of propulsion system is already in use for space exploration.

Dawn

I'm not sure though, as I simple recalled hearing about this drive and this probe. Could be different, correct me if I'm wrong.

***New Horizons may also be outfitted with this/similar engines.***
edit on 30-6-2013 by MmmPie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 03:40 AM
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Originally posted by MmmPie
If I'm not mistaken this type of propulsion system is already in use for space exploration.

Dawn

I'm not sure though, as I simple recalled hearing about this drive and this probe. Could be different, correct me if I'm wrong.


Yup, you are right.

But this is more of a "record breaking accomplishment" for the longest running space propulsion device... 5.5 yrs...

I took a quick peek at the wiki link and it says it launched Late Sept, 2007. That would be 5 years in Sept...

So, I guess the dawn probe will eventually take the record depending on how the prerequisites are determined and if they actually fire the engine constantly.... But I think that is the intent... ion engines keep firing constantly...

I imagine ion engines might shut down to perform diagnostics at times... But I dunno..

The article seems to suggest NASA said had over 48,000 hrs and just decided to shut the project down. I'm not sure if the projects goal was to actually set a world record per say... The device was working fine when then did shut it down, so it was not an endurance failure or anything like that...



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 03:43 AM
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Has any one any information on how long a journey to Mars would take with this type of engine?
edit on 30-6-2013 by AthlonSavage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 03:52 AM
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Originally posted by bloodreviara
I really wish the general populace had not lost their drive
for space exploration...


I agree... but I think now it is more a global effort... Well, obviously the ISS, but just recently the UK announced working on a radiation shielding device for space travel, and of course Canada has the Canada Arm...

I think we are supposed to leave our planet eventually... Either that or the human race is doomed to die of some natural or man made catastrophe... Be it global warming, asteroids, super volcano or nuclear weapons / plant melt downs, sun winking out...

We should start planning a planet engine and terraform Mars...



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 03:58 AM
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Originally posted by Chargeit
Good find.

I always love the general lack of interest in things related to "real" space travel... Add UFO, or alien into your title and this would have already been a 6 page thread.


Yeah I agree... I was actually surprised not to see something posted here already...

Coast to Coast linked me to the original article, so I guess that is the only alien or UFO connection...

Cheers,



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 04:03 AM
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Originally posted by AthlonSavage
Has any one any information on how long a journey to Mars would take with this type of engine?
edit on 30-6-2013 by AthlonSavage because: (no reason given)


Yup.


How much time would a spacecraft using ion propulsion take to get to Mars? Can the technology be used for a manned mission to Mars? Ion propulsion could be used for a manned mission to Mars. The decision on whether that would be the preferred approach would involve many questions such as which technique might get the crew there the fastest (independent of how fuel efficient the trip might be) in order to reduce the radiation exposure and effects of long periods of near weightlessness.


Source

Doesn't really answer your question...

But I guess if speed were a factor, they might use a hybrid type system to fire rockets initially to reach max velocity and then turn on the ion drive to keep pushing it along getting faster and faster up to 90,000 mph...

I think...
edit on 30-6-2013 by ByteChanger because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 04:07 AM
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It takes a longer time to accelerate an object with an ion engine compared to a more conventional rocket engine. So this would be great for a long distance flight like the Voyagers', but less desirable for a trip to the moon or Mars.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 04:11 AM
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reply to post by _Del_
 


That was my initial thought as well.


It seems like the perfect system for maneuvering a craft once it is already launched.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 04:23 AM
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Five years non stop. Yup it works
-if the trip takes five years



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 04:27 AM
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reply to post by ByteChanger
 


As I, a complete neophyte, understand it, that's exactly what they plan. The initial acceleration is done with chemical rockets, with ion used to maintain it.

Or so I read a few years back...

Completely doable.



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 05:49 AM
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Originally posted by ByteChanger
They say it is not as powerful as a chemical rocket, however they are much more efficient... Perfect for deep space exploration..


Why is that ATS users read *ONE* website about a topic and immediately rush to post a new thread?
Wouldnt it make more sense to READ a little bit more about, for example, ion thrusters to learn a bit more first?

Thrust: 235 milliNewtons. **
And yes, various ion thruster models have already been launched into space before now.


Edit - about 23 grams of force.
edit on 30-6-2013 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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reply to post by ByteChanger
 


I love you so much for posting this!!!!!! The mars comment about comfortable manned space flights with this technology made me wonder! I am sure that the gov't has some top secret free energy device that includes the works of many great minds including nikolai tesla! EM scalar energy and anti-gravitation via toroidal like engines!

we are living in a time of string theories and god particles, ANYTHING IS FEASIBLE!
edit on 30-6-2013 by Puresk1lls because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 06:02 AM
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reply to post by Chargeit
 


Amen to that! lol!



posted on Jun, 30 2013 @ 07:15 AM
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Originally posted by ByteChanger
But this is more of a "record breaking accomplishment" for the longest running space propulsion device... 5.5 yrs...

I took a quick peek at the wiki link and it says it launched Late Sept, 2007. That would be 5 years in Sept...


6 years if the date you provided is correct, not 5



posted on Jul, 1 2013 @ 01:28 AM
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Originally posted by verschickter

Originally posted by ByteChanger
But this is more of a "record breaking accomplishment" for the longest running space propulsion device... 5.5 yrs...

I took a quick peek at the wiki link and it says it launched Late Sept, 2007. That would be 5 years in Sept...


6 years if the date you provided is correct, not 5


Doh...

you are right... I actually forgot it was 2013....

wow... I even used my fingers...
edit on 1-7-2013 by ByteChanger because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2013 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by ByteChanger
 


used them too for double security



posted on Jul, 1 2013 @ 09:11 PM
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Actually the 90,000 mph will be in a vacuum so the affect is cumulative. Some estimates with respect to Ion Propulsion in respect to a year show the craft moving at about 1/2 that of light.

The problem with going faster than that is time dilation.

With this technology we could travel to the nearest star and back in about 20 years.






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