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Education - Are you proud of where you've been, or perhaps want to go?

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posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 10:12 PM
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Ok, I know some ATS members like to be very private and guarded, while others proudly display their photos.

I suppose this thread is for the more outgoing people, although educational facilities have thousands of students moving through them every year, so an alma mater is hardly an identikit.

Since the global village is growing closer with exchange students and travel, the choices of educational facilities across the globe is also growing for individuals, and studying "abroad" is a feasible option.

In that sense, even if people don't reveal where they've been, maybe they just heard about a good or even a bad campus, and I wonder if ATS members would like to share an educational facility like a college or university?

Is it good for all studies or just some?
Should some universities be avoided?

The details are up to the individual to share.

The aim is to inspire information for the next generation, or even older prospective students to use.

Well, I'd like to share the history of an university, called the University of Cape Town (UCT).


edit on 28-6-2013 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 10:50 PM
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One thing I've never quite understood however was changing the "Faculty of Arts" into the "Faculty of Humanities".

I've also noticed that not all universities have done this.

What is the difference?

OK, art might actually produce something apart from analysis.
Even if it's just gold-fish in a blender.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 10:55 PM
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Ooh, I think I understand.

They do art, and then we establish it by making enthusiastic or wry comments.

It's a discursive relationship, both establishing the artist and the critic as important.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 11:03 PM
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I've always wondered about religious colleges in the US.

I guess the received stereotype is that they're really producing people who can only be used for a certain type of media or politics.

Perhaps that makes their graduates employable.

But is it really so narrow?

Do any of them excel in other fields?



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 11:38 PM
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Originally posted by halfoldman
I've always wondered about religious colleges in the US.

I guess the received stereotype is that they're really producing people who can only be used for a certain type of media or politics.

Perhaps that makes their graduates employable.

But is it really so narrow?

Do any of them excel in other fields?


First, a relevant bit about me.

I grew up a very poor country boy. Small town of about 300 folks. I have never been very religious. Often not even theist in any way. I spent my life so far on that journey of discovering self and other (me and the world), But growing up in the Bible Belt, I had so much exposure to religion that I really could have just preferred die (at that time).

So I ended up attending a baptist university. Hardin Simmons University. They had a football team that was recruiting me, headed by Jimmy Keeling. Not going to write his bio here, but he is a legend in Texas football (second only to maybe Gordon Wood). So i decided to tolerate all the baptist nonsense to play for him.

I didn't fit in with the people at all. There were quite a few of us country boys on the football team. And a bunch of thugs from New Jersey on the baseball team. But the rest of the campus was wealthy and white. Of course I am white too. But i am from a hispanic culture, and like to have folks of a similar culture to hang out with on occasion (or at least, at that time while going through culture shock). I just didn't have anyone I clicked with. I couldn't focus on classes. And there was no money available to do anything other than just classes. I worked, obviously. But working while studying while playing football....you see the problem.

So my college career was short lived. I wouldn't go back if it was free. I am pretty smart, and have done just fine without a degree.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 

Thanks for that.
Of course tertiary education isn't for everyone, and people will drop out.
I think we've probably entered an age where it is a liability.
That is, a lot of employers want working experience.



posted on Jun, 29 2013 @ 12:02 AM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 


That is how I did it. Found a smaller corporation (in call centers) that allowed me to learn management skills on the job, along with developing a mastery of data tools (I only let my boss think he knows more about Excel than me
).

College became less accessible. And the ones who went clogged up the IT and legal fields. Leaving plenty of meat on the bone for someone who can hustle, and is able to plan accordingly.



posted on Jun, 29 2013 @ 01:53 AM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 


I loved everything about going to the university. Parties, women, friends, and the academics. I was fortunate enough to have a music scholarship and majored in music for a few years but lost interest and changed to the social sciences where I studied psychology, sociology and eventually got my degree in anthropology [early man archaeology]. Continued on to graduate school received an MA and teaching credential At Cal State East Bay. Started on my Phd but married and went to work full time. I have never used my education professionally and have always been self-employed as a designer/craftsman, flyfishing guide/outfitter and working in the movie industry as an SAG actor and crew member. Currently I have a small film production company, working on our first feature length movie. I have been blessed to have always made a decent living following my dreams.



posted on Jun, 29 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by olaru12
 

I think the time spent at University is fantastic.

It's a bit of an ivory tower and closed world with its own rules.

The ethos of treating people equally is however the same as many non-academic places nowadays.

It's really a magic place.
OK it's no Hogwarts, although I think that was based on it in many ways.
A bit amoral in certain respects.
edit on 29-6-2013 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



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