Name a couple foods that are tasty, and that you can use in a grab n go emergency.

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posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 10:49 AM
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reply to post by SkepticOverlord
 


+1 on the Fig Newtons. Excellent, tasty and small to pack.
Although after I eat an entire row I get sick of them.


To the OP...
Best food for a grab n go situation is anything you can grab.
Canned food, boxed food, or just anything small and lightweight.
Just make sure you have the means to open cans and cook food.
Preparation to me means water, food, shelter.
Taste won't make a difference if you are in survival mode.
Cauliflower? That's rabbit food!
Proteins and carbs and lots of them to survive.
Anything goes.

Now just for camping, that's a different story!
The best food you can take is whatever you enjoy!
Dried foods are ok but they'll cause you to consume more liquids.
I always bring small cuts of venison to cook with hickory bark found locally.
I can smoke it overnight and it'll last for weeks. Depending on the fat content.
By far the best tasting deer you'll ever eat. And over an open campfire?
I'm getting hungry just thinking about it!






posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 10:52 AM
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Certainly a tastier option than most...
(Fig Newtons)
edit on 28-6-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


My suggestion to you is... go to a (fairly large) grocery store...go to the fresh fruit and vegetable section...and select from all the fruits and vegetables that are on display to choose from... that do not require refrigeration...or watering.

All those foods are good and healthy choices.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by caladonea
 


Not exactly grab and go though. How do you store them while moving, for example?



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 04:02 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
reply to post by caladonea
 


Not exactly grab and go though. How do you store them while moving, for example?


Well...my thinking is...there are many fresh fruit and vegetables...that do not need to be stored in the refrigerator...you know the ones that are on display in the produce section without refrigeration of any kind...those could be easily transported in a variety of containers.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by SkepticOverlord

Fig Newtons for the win!

Back when I was a competitive cyclist, Fig Newtons were the unsung hero and often preferred over energy bars by many cyclists. Square, compact, and a dense food-source, there's a high calorie count in a relative small amount of space, with a fair bit of good stuff -- fibre, anti-oxidants, vitamins, etc.

And, they last a fairly long amount of time.

Fig Newtons and almonds... you have all you need to cram a lot of calories into a small space.


Pardon me, but...Fig Newtons are yummy, but second-rate. Buy the real deal: Fig Newmans. Compare ingredients, and see which one lists figs first. Yes, almonds are excellent. If you're going to cook, remember that the human animal can live almost indefinitely on millet. It's bland, but it will keep you alive and moving.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


I suggest getting to know your local plants mainly mushrooms, but also some of the more easily obtainable plants that grow in your. I think youll find there are many more then you thought.

I pick oyster mushrooms every time it rains. Also we have daisies lavender and many others such as strawberries, black berries and everything.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 05:36 PM
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5lb Bag of rice
5lb Bag of red beans
Water filter



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


Nuts and raisins. If they were already mentioned, oh well
I didn't read the entire thread.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 05:46 PM
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Usually when we go on our weekend hiking trips we'll pack some oatmeal (not instant), a couple cans of tuna, I think its Starkist has their gourmet that has different seasonings such as chipotle and olive oil or jalapeno and oil. We'll also pack some of our home made jerky of differing varieties, some dried fruit such as apple or banana chips or dried blueberries, along with honey.

This pretty much covers all your bodies caloric needs and we'll add to our food supply by trapping, hunting or fishing depending on the time of year.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 05:50 PM
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Beef jerky, nuts, dried fruit.

Live forever.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 07:29 PM
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Steamed rice with miso.
Raw celery and carrots.
Light red wine, strong green tea.
Steamed oyster mushrooms.
Peanut butter (pure, not this flour-adulterated one)
But then again, I'm a Vulcan...



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 07:37 PM
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grab and go... any and all breakfast type bars, granola bars, a block of cheese and a loaf of bread and of course as much water as I can carry



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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Freshly dug potatoes, wild green onions, oh and of course
Dry land fish(we call it that) lol
You got yourself great food with proteins
And nutrients and very filling and satisfying .
Peace
FreeFalling



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 09:08 PM
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Nutrigrain bars.

Apples

Bananas



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 09:33 PM
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This one may have already been mentioned, but Peanut Buttter seems like a good choice. Very nutrient dense. Lots of calories, fat, protein, carbs, and it's hecka tasty, and goes well with lots of stuff, or just by itself.

In terms of grab-and-go survival food, I have a little tip for you:


1- Jug of good Whey protein that contains a good mix of Branch Chain Amino Acids

2- Jug of dietary fiber supplement (like metamucil, or generics)

3- Multivitamins


Sure, it's not the most filling combo in the world. But if you get good stuff, that is a sizable chunk of nutrients, which can make up the better part of quite a number of meals, and which is also very light and can fit in a small space. The items on the list above, alone, almost make up a complete meal with pretty decent nutrition-- complete with vitamins, minerals, and fiber. What that does not include a lot of is fat and carbohydrates (as most whey protein only has small amounts of both), both of which are necessary for good nutrition. So you'd need something additional to take care of that. But 30-60 or so meals worth of protein, fiber, and micronutrients that weighs only a few pounds and can fit in a small backpack ain't bad.


Also, of course, both the whey protein and fiber being in powder form, you will need access to drinkable water-- but you would need that anyway.


PS-- If you buy the right stuff, this can also be cheap survival food, which can be stored for decent periods of time as long as they're unopened, and even a good while after they are.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 09:40 PM
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Originally posted by onequestion
reply to post by spartacus699
 


I suggest getting to know your local plants mainly mushrooms, but also some of the more easily obtainable plants that grow in your. I think youll find there are many more then you thought.

I pick oyster mushrooms every time it rains. Also we have daisies lavender and many others such as strawberries, black berries and everything.




1- most mushroms have negligible nutrients compared to a lot of other food sources. Not very calorie dense. Few carbs, and maybe some vitamins / minerals. IMHO mushrooms are better for morale (if you enjoy that kind of food) more than anything else.

2- it should be common sense, but I want to caution here that people need to be VERY careful when picking wild mushrooms. Make sure you can clearly identify what you're picking. Be clear on whether there are any other non-edible / poisonous species which closely resemble your target mushroom, as is sometimes the case.

Mushroom poisoning can be fatal. It can be a horrible way to die, as well. With some mushrooms it does not take a lot, and with some it may take days or longer before you start to realize you made a huge mistake.


The oysters you mentioned aren't too bad. Those have a very distinctive appearance, so they're easier to ID. "Chicken of the woods" and related species are pretty good in that regard as well, and I''m told they really do taste quite a bit like meat when cooked.


Be safe. When there is ANY doubt about what you're doing, I'd say "don't do it." A very small amount of nutrients / food is not worth risking your life.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 09:42 PM
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Oatmeal! I keep a couple of packets in my car and change them intermittently. I keep it for those just in case I get stuck somewhere moments. All you need is some water you don't even need to make it hot. I also have a small bag of cinnamon to sprinkle on if I want. Oh, don't forget honey. It keeps well and you can put in on almost anything to make it sweeter.



posted on Jun, 29 2013 @ 02:16 AM
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Originally posted by spartacus699
Describe a few healthy foods that are similiar in nature that we can consider. Like if we dont' want to pack a big cooler of food. We're going somewhere for a weekend or a week, and we just want to grab a few things that don't require any preparation or cooking and that are still nutritious, tasty and healthy, what do you suggest???


From what you require, canned ravioli, crackers, and hot sauce. Plenty of calories with a touch of veggies.

Other than MRE's, canned pasta is king. Carbs, protein and sauce, nothing can beat it. Light weight crackers will always be better than nuts when supplementing calories. Easy to digest and easy to eat. The almost perfect RV food.



posted on Jun, 29 2013 @ 02:23 AM
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If you take water and a kettle / stove, I would recommend dried foods that re hydrate easily, aren't too bulky and are light and won't spoil.

Such as couscous, dried onions, dried bell peppers, dried mushrooms, dried tomato, dried meat if you can find it, or dried soya, stock cubes / powder, dried fortified milk powder, instant oats, honey, seasonings, dried herbs, dried soups like the higher end cup of soup packets, garlic / tomato paste in tubes, 'instant' noodles, dried fruit like apricot, apples, figs, dates, nuts, things like instant vegetarian jelly (jello), instant custard. If feeling more adventurous, there is bread mix for baking bread on a campfire and vegetarian sosmix, burgermix etc for vege burgers and vege sausages, instant mash, dried stuffing mix, instant organic gravy if 'Sunday Roast' is an essential.

A few pots / bowls etc and a whole range of meals can be made from lightweight, dried foods, obviously the better quality will taste better, a lot of organic stores stock these ingredients. If you can make an outdoors oven, even better.
edit on 29-6-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)





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