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Vandenberg NASA launch 06/27/2013

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posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 12:24 AM
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From about 122 miles away:



news article on launch

In cause you are curious, the "radar horizon", which isn't exactly the visual horizon, in statute miles can be estimated to be 1.4*sqrt(altitude in feet). So a launch at 39kft can be seen for about 276 miles. But the launch point is over the ocean (N36 W123), so probably the central valley (Fresno) and the mountains to the east are the limit to see the start of the launch.




posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 04:32 AM
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Cool. An airlaunch caught on a pic. Nice job gariac!



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 05:21 AM
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Here is a picture of the type of aircraft and rocket that was used
en.wikipedia.org...:Lockheed_TriStar_launches_Pegasus_with_Space_Technology_5.jpg
edit on 28-6-2013 by hellobruce because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by hellobruce
 



Maybe this link will work.


The plane is based out of Mojave. It is on the Mojave SGT (self guided tour):
Mojave Airport SGT

You can notice a change in the contrail thickness. Maybe it has multiple stages. On my list tonight is to find the NASA video of the launch, which I assume has some sort of commentary.

I know the rocket is dropped from the plane a does some free fall. You can also see that in the contrail Now how it changes course that dramatically is itself interesting. Either the rocket has a very large swing in the gimbal, or they do some other foo.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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Three stages. The wing and the vanes provide the pitch-authority. There is no gimbaling.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 04:46 PM
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edit on 28-6-2013 by hellobruce because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by hellobruce
 


That's amazing. Great technology. Imagine having to strap that to a rocket and launch from the ground. Wonder how much money they saved



posted on Jun, 29 2013 @ 12:18 AM
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A bit more commentary here.

NASA website

It looks like there is only video up to stage one. Since you can see a change in the contrail, I think I got stage two as well, but I'm not positive. Stage one ended at 100kft.

No flaps on the wings, so the direction of flight is done with the tail fins. The commentary said it is one of the last few l1011 aircraft in the US flying. Back in the day, the L1011 was the San Jose to LA commuter aircraft of PSA. Not very fuel efficient.

PSA L1011.

There astill are a few three engine jets in service, mostly Falcon 900, which has a little resemblance to the L1011.And of course the tristar tankers.
RAF tanker



posted on Jun, 29 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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Forget about the KC-10 and MD-11's?



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 04:14 AM
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very interesting.









 
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