80% of Processed Foods in US Are Banned In Other Nations

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posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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Wow, I have to echo the opening sentiments of the following article, I know processed foods are bad but this is kind of shocking-

80% of processed food is banned in other nations



I write a lot about the dangers of processed foods when it comes to wreaking havoc on our health, but even I was surprised to find that 80% of pre-packaged foods sold in the United States are actually banned in other nations. And for good reason.

Whether it’s toxic soda brands like Mountain Dew, or sugary artificial cereals and carcinogenic ‘potato’ chips, around 80% of the processed food variety within the US actually contains ingredients that are banned around the world in countries like Canada and the United Kingdom. As a matter of fact, sometimes they’re banned throughout the entire European Union. The FDA, however, seems quite alright with these disease-linked substances lurking within the food supply.



If you throw in flouride that is added to drinking water supplies and is for the most part banned in Europe also, what the hell is going on America?





posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by Wonderer2012
 





If you throw in flouride that is added to drinking water supplies and is for the most part banned in Europe also, what the hell is going on America?


Genocide. It's called "soft killing". Poison people slowly overtime, and decrease rates in fertility for the goal of implementing the Georgia Guidestones. Those things are not a joke, someone thought they'd put their plan right down in front of us all and see wether or not we'd believe it. Most didn't. Brainwashing successful.



posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by Wonderer2012
 


It would be interesting to see the complete list of foods they ban. Just so I can try to avoid them. If our own country isn't concerned about our health, we have to look outside our borders to get the information. Having said that, now I feel like I live in a totalitarian state.



posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 08:22 PM
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Originally posted by WeRpeons
reply to post by Wonderer2012
 


It would be interesting to see the complete list of foods they ban. Just so I can try to avoid them. If our own country isn't concerned about our health, we have to look outside our borders to get the information. Having said that, now I feel like I live in a totalitarian state.


Why has our government been so obsessed with getting fluoride into every water supply throughout the country, but allows poisons to be sold in our food supply? If they're obsessed about one, then it only makes sense that they should be obsessed about the other. Or, fluoride has never been intended to be used for healthier teeth.



posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 08:31 PM
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What are you guys talking about? Processed foods are fine, the FDA says so, that's all I need to know. Now where's my potato chips and tall glass of city tap water..... ***sip*** Oh yeah, that's the stuff right there. ..



posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 08:37 PM
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Originally posted by Wonderer2012
Wow, I have to echo the opening sentiments of the following article, I know processed foods are bad but this is kind of shocking-


So what is their source for the 80% figure?

You should have read the whole page, and would have seen

This website is not a peer reviewed journal, but a blog, and platform to sell advertising, and supplements



posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 08:50 PM
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reply to post by hellobruce
 


The 80% might be an exaggeration but many things are not and in the accumulation it might not be that far off. For instance US meat products have substances that are banned in Europe (hormones, antibiotics, etc) from cattle to chickens, the we can look into the GMO from feed to flower and oils add to that some additives and flavorers and you might get there...

PS: Gave you a star by the factoid on the source.
edit on 27-6-2013 by Panic2k11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by WeRpeons
 


I was able to buy Pringles, Snickers, and Oreos in Nepal, so there's a small chance those aren't on the list.

Still doesn't mean they have any nutritional value whatsoever.



posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 11:09 PM
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Originally posted by riddle6
I was able to buy Pringles, Snickers, and Oreos in Nepal,


Are they even food?



posted on Jun, 27 2013 @ 11:31 PM
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Originally posted by hellobruce

Originally posted by riddle6
I was able to buy Pringles, Snickers, and Oreos in Nepal,


Are they even food?


Those are for the American tourists. Foreign food over there. Cures the homesickness. Fell off a truck, not deliberately imported; got bartered, a few boxes of candy for a goat.

Meanwhile in the USA you can get foreign food from the fake globally-minded markets; you can get saltines in a metal box from China for example. So about 80% of the food "over there" isn't available in the US...like uh, canned dog meat from South Korea. International culture boundaries.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 01:20 AM
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Well.. maybe 80% of the non-foods that Americans call food are banned. We only very recently were allowed caffeine in non-cola pops, like Mountain Dew. I've never had Cheez-its and can't believe I'm missing something..

However 100% of real food is not banned. Okay, I lie, unpasturized milk is still a no-go.
edit on 28-6-2013 by smilesmcgee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 02:08 AM
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Originally posted by WeRpeons
reply to post by Wonderer2012
 


It would be interesting to see the complete list of foods they ban. Just so I can try to avoid them. If our own country isn't concerned about our health, we have to look outside our borders to get the information. Having said that, now I feel like I live in a totalitarian state.


It's actually 11 ingredients that are banned by some or all European countries. Here's a couple articles...

abcnews.go.com...

www.emaxhealth.com...



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 03:15 AM
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It actually might be even over 80%, at least when compared to EU.

Just some examples:

1) Most GMO-containing foods
2) Milk and Beef due to used hormones/antibiotics, in EU all antibiotics are banned from farming.
3) Chicken due to same reasons + arsenic used when growing
4) Coloring agents (blue 1, blue 2, yellow 5 and yellow 6), which are common in cake, candy, macaroni and cheese, medicines, sport drinks, soda, pet food, and cheese
5) Olestra (aka Olean) found in fat-free potato chips
6) Brominated vegetable oil (aka BVO) which is found in sports drinks and citrus-flavored sodas
7) Potassium bromate (aka brominated flour) which is ingredient in rolls, wraps, flatbread, bread crumbs, and bagel chips
8) Azodicarbonamide found in reads, frozen dinners, boxed pasta mixes, and packaged baked goods
9) BHA and BHT in cereal, nut mixes, gum, butter, meat, dehydrated potatoes, and beer
10) HCFS is highly regulated in EU, so not used in much products.
11) Many pesticides used in US are banned in EU.

www.shape.com...
www.motherjones.com...
www.treehugger.com...


Somebody mentioned of trying US products elsewhere. The thing is, these products have different recipe. We have a lot of same products that are in US, from Coca Cola to Lays, Pringles, Snickers etc etc. Although European ones have different recipe. It tastes same, but the recipe is different including healthier alternatives.

In USA everything is more of a business, even health care. In most European countries government pays for the universal health care. Of course the money comes from taxes, although there is no private insurance and one does not have to pay extreme fees. Every month about 8-9% of my salary goes to health care. I do not pay the taxes myself, this is done by the company. It is probably much less at the end than most US people are paying from premium insurance. Also it covers absolutely anything. Maximum cost for seeing any doctor is 5 euros (7,5 dollars) including all the necessary tests. In my opinion it is worth, and I am happy with the system, as I never have to worry about health costs, whatever happens to me.

Although if the obesity rates were similar to US, or there would be not so many banned substances, there would be far more health issues and it would bankrupt the country, so the governments have more responsibility over serving the health of the people. In US at the end people themselves pay for their treatment, round here it is different. Some tests, issues might cost far more than I actually put in the health system of my salary, although if too many people had so high costs for health, it would bankrupt the country.

Another reasons for the bans is the weaker power of corporations. In US for banning something a link is often not enough, a 100% proof is required by the corporations, who would lose from it and lawsuits come. Round here bans are often more precautionary. If there is a definete link, but no proof, it is enough to ban something. At the end, you can not uncancer somebody, but you can unban the foods. If these were legal, the people who get diseases can not held the company responsible for it, as it was legal at that point. I agree personally with how it is done round here, better safe than sorry.
edit on 28-6-2013 by Cabin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 04:40 AM
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One thing I did find strange is when I went to Rome, I went to a local supermarket. And they had barely any of the types of groceries we see in north american stores! Not even close! All they had was mostly stuff you'd add in the course of cooking an actual meal. There was no processed, precooked, prepackaged, ready to eat anything! All just healthy normal food. And what's weird is I didn't know what to buy either as I'm so use to eating the crap we have. Food for thought.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 07:44 AM
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Originally posted by spartacus699
One thing I did find strange is when I went to Rome, I went to a local supermarket. And they had barely any of the types of groceries we see in north american stores! Not even close! All they had was mostly stuff you'd add in the course of cooking an actual meal. There was no processed, precooked, prepackaged, ready to eat anything! All just healthy normal food. And what's weird is I didn't know what to buy either as I'm so use to eating the crap we have. Food for thought.

Especially in France and Italy is pride for "national cuisine" big factor. Also life style is quite different. People often eat together, dinner may be 3 hours event with 10+ courses, 4 being minimum. Processed food is expansive and quite disgusting if you are accustomed to home/local restaurant food. For many people is cooking relaxation, even meditation and nice way how to share world with family and friends. In post communist countries there was wave of processed food and fast-food chains in 90. but it is slowly receding and people are looking more for quality and experience - if they have money of course. If you are poor then cooking from scratch is much cheaper than processed foods and even with really small budget you can eat pretty well. I bake my own bread for example because I was not satisfied with what I can get in local shops - and it is about 60% cheaper in this type of bread (100% rye, complex long time fermentation) electricity included. Drawback is time.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by Cabin
It actually might be even over 80%, at least when compared to EU.

Just some examples:

1) Most GMO-containing foods
2) Milk and Beef due to used hormones/antibiotics, in EU all antibiotics are banned from farming.
3) Chicken due to same reasons + arsenic used when growing
4) Coloring agents (blue 1, blue 2, yellow 5 and yellow 6), which are common in cake, candy, macaroni and cheese, medicines, sport drinks, soda, pet food, and cheese
5) Olestra (aka Olean) found in fat-free potato chips
6) Brominated vegetable oil (aka BVO) which is found in sports drinks and citrus-flavored sodas
7) Potassium bromate (aka brominated flour) which is ingredient in rolls, wraps, flatbread, bread crumbs, and bagel chips
8) Azodicarbonamide found in reads, frozen dinners, boxed pasta mixes, and packaged baked goods
9) BHA and BHT in cereal, nut mixes, gum, butter, meat, dehydrated potatoes, and beer
10) HCFS is highly regulated in EU, so not used in much products.
11) Many pesticides used in US are banned in EU.

www.shape.com...
www.motherjones.com...
www.treehugger.com...


Somebody mentioned of trying US products elsewhere. The thing is, these products have different recipe. We have a lot of same products that are in US, from Coca Cola to Lays, Pringles, Snickers etc etc. Although European ones have different recipe. It tastes same, but the recipe is different including healthier alternatives.

In USA everything is more of a business, even health care. In most European countries government pays for the universal health care. Of course the money comes from taxes, although there is no private insurance and one does not have to pay extreme fees. Every month about 8-9% of my salary goes to health care. I do not pay the taxes myself, this is done by the company. It is probably much less at the end than most US people are paying from premium insurance. Also it covers absolutely anything. Maximum cost for seeing any doctor is 5 euros (7,5 dollars) including all the necessary tests. In my opinion it is worth, and I am happy with the system, as I never have to worry about health costs, whatever happens to me.

Although if the obesity rates were similar to US, or there would be not so many banned substances, there would be far more health issues and it would bankrupt the country, so the governments have more responsibility over serving the health of the people. In US at the end people themselves pay for their treatment, round here it is different. Some tests, issues might cost far more than I actually put in the health system of my salary, although if too many people had so high costs for health, it would bankrupt the country.

Another reasons for the bans is the weaker power of corporations. In US for banning something a link is often not enough, a 100% proof is required by the corporations, who would lose from it and lawsuits come. Round here bans are often more precautionary. If there is a definete link, but no proof, it is enough to ban something. At the end, you can not uncancer somebody, but you can unban the foods. If these were legal, the people who get diseases can not held the company responsible for it, as it was legal at that point. I agree personally with how it is done round here, better safe than sorry.
edit on 28-6-2013 by Cabin because: (no reason given)


Thanks for sharing that list.




posted on Jun, 29 2013 @ 12:47 AM
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Originally posted by Wonderer2012


If you throw in flouride that is added to drinking water supplies and is for the most part banned in Europe also, what the hell is going on America?



They are trying to kill us. All of us. Please Send Help Now.

( You think I'm kidding.. seriously.. we're doomed)

Isn't slowly poisoning your countries people for years until they die illegal by some international treaty? If not, why isn't it?
edit on 29-6-2013 by JohnPhoenix because: sp



posted on Jul, 1 2013 @ 12:57 AM
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reply to post by Sandalphon
 


Fair point to both of you, and I'd hesitate to call them anything close to food. But it was familiar and edible, so I bought it at their version of a supermarket. The only one that I'd say that had a chance of not being deliberately imported was the Oreos, and that's only because I saw them in that one place. Snickers and Pringles were everywhere, even in the mountains (Snickers were great while trekking, they were filling and provided temporary energy).

But back to the whole point of this article. What most Americans consider food is an abomination to the word. Most of the food I ate overseas was home grown and freshly made. I've never had that much genuinely good food before (and it really only consisted of rice and vegetables). I've attempt to replicate some of that since I've returned, but its impossible since our vegetables are more fake and pickled than anything real or original.



posted on Mar, 22 2014 @ 04:34 PM
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