Ancient Egyptian statue has started MOVING sparking fears it has been struck by a

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posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by marhaba
 


How is it common sense?

Which stone object you have seen rotating on its "axis" by vibrations?

I have seen none.

Why the museum not calling "scientists" to investigate?




posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 01:40 AM
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reply to post by GargIndia
 


Here's one i found, bit easy nowadays with google or bing or whatever search engine you like to use...
(Deny Ignorance)

www.english-heritage.org.uk... tion-rio.pdf



Vibration is most commonly encountered in museums and historic houses as a consequence of visitor circulation. It can be particularly pronounced on poorly supported wooden floors, and such vibration is extremely expensive to reduce. This is the major source of vibration to which most objects in museums are exposed. Recently, the emphasis on access and cost has led to building work being undertaken in close proximity to objects on display or in storage. This can generate much higher and more damaging vibration levels than public circulation.

Vibration can lead to object damage through a number of mechanisms. Toppling is of serious concern during earthquakes, when the vibration can have a significant horizontal component, but toppling is less likely from flooring vibrations. The forces induced by the vibration can cause direct damage to weak or fragile objects, especially those with friable pigments or loose corrosion products. Where objects are constrained by mounts, then impact with, or abrasion against, the mount can be damaging. Finally, unrestrained objects can move or ‘walk’ on shelves under the influence of vibration. As well as the potential for impact with other objects, if an object were to ‘walk’ off a shelf this could be catastrophic both to the object itself and to objects below.

The potential risks to museum objects from vibration have been commented upon by several authors and are mentioned in most texts on preventive conservation. Glass, mineral and anthropological collections are reported to be susceptible to vibration damage and anecdotal evidence has been published (Lins 1977, Scott 1989, Waller 1990). However, effective risk assessments for ambient vibrations caused by visitor circulation or for building work are hindered by a lack of published vibration damage levels for museum artefacts. The impact of vibration on paintings and some sculpture has been studied for transportation and some work has been published on the possibility of toppling during earthquakes (Agbabian et al. 1990, Mecklenburg and Tumosa 1991, Michalski 1991, Marcon et al. 1999, Sanders et al. 1999). Standards exist for vibration levels likely to cause damage to building fabrics and nuisance to humans occupying buildings (BSI 1992, BSI 1993, DIN 1997). However, there appears to be a singular lack of data for other types of objects or situations commonly encountered in museums and historic houses.

A major building project at the British Museum, The Great Court, instigated an extensive programme of vibration measurement. The development involved the demolition of redundant buildings and extensive foundation work in the central courtyard of the museum. A large number of galleries and storerooms abut the central courtyard on two levels and were expected to be affected
...



Bear in mind the statue is made of hard uneven stone on a smooth glass surface...



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 07:06 PM
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reply to post by marhaba
 


Thats what I am saying. The statue should move (NOT rotate) under random vibrations.

Rotation for a stone statue is highly unusual.

The museum must have consulted the "scientists" already and for sure they do not have an explanation.

No report that I have seen "explains" the vibrations.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 08:49 PM
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Originally posted by GargIndia
reply to post by marhaba
 


How is it common sense?

Which stone object you have seen rotating on its "axis" by vibrations?

I have seen none.

Why the museum not calling "scientists" to investigate?


I guess the museum are not calling scientists to investigate because nobody actually cares, it is most likely vibration, if not it's rather cool, but at the end of the day it doesn't really matter.



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by Ramcheck
 


Which direction does it face when it turns on its own? It seems to stop in a certain direction (facing the beer jar).

I cannot make out the direction from the video.

Have you seen the museum in person, and if yes can you help me tell the direction?



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 02:13 AM
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reply to post by GargIndia
 


It stops because it cannot turn anymore as the base already reached and blocked by the wall of the shelf!

Here's the pic.
edit on 4-7-2013 by marhaba because: ETA PIC



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 06:20 PM
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reply to post by marhaba
 


The statue will keep on shifting inside the case if vibration is the reason. It will not be stopped by the case wall.

A stone statue is heavy, even a small one. This one has a good base, so its COG is low. There is no reason it will rotate due to vibrations.

Can somebody convince the museum to place the statue in the middle of glass case and then observe the rotation.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 06:14 AM
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Wow, that's pretty wild (if it's NOT a hoax concocted by the museum to get more visitors/media attention or just the janitors etc turning it). If it's none of the above, then perhaps there is something in the statue that acts as some sort of rotation device, in some way.. I don't think that this would have any correlation with a "curse" since in my book, something moving/rotating isn't exactly my idea of a curse..



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by TheIceQueen
 


The statue is not "possessed". No soul can possess a stone statue.

The power that is moving the statue is outside.

You people have no idea of soul beings and their power. These are NOT ghosts. You cannot see them until you are spiritually advanced.

These things happen as somebody wants to give a warning. The statue in itself has no significance.



posted on Jul, 7 2013 @ 11:34 PM
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One of my friends parents had a pair of "haunted" status that would mysteriously turn to face one another everyday. His mother would face them looking forward every day and by the night they would face one another.

These status were on top of a fridge, the slight vibration that was created from the freezer was the culprit. Simply removing them from atop of the fridge cured them of their "possession".

These status were made of cast iron and about the size of the statue in the OP.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by strafgod
 


Are you still in possession of these statues? Try again by placing on top of the fridge, and report back.

And why would it stop rotating (at facing each other). It should continue rotating forever if vibration from fridge is the cause. Can you please explain why would it stop rotating?



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 12:38 AM
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There was a blog posting a few weeks ago that gives more information...


...the statuette was taken out of its case during refurbishment works on the gallery a few weeks ago.
The base of the statuette is convex and was prone to pivot on a certain point, and the statuette spun very easily when given the slightest nudge – or from tapping the glass shelf on which it rested.
Even very subtle vibrations would cause such movement.



...the ‘spinning statue’ sensation says far more about popular culture and perceptions of ancient Egypt in 2013 than it does about any one object.
... the ‘spinning statuette’ has reinforced tired ideas of ancient Egypt being weird, mysterious and spooky.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 12:48 AM
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Im going to say that its from vibration. I have a glass display at my work with bottles on it. in a 3-4 day duration, those bottles move over 2 inches. the cabinets are on the 2nd floor and pick up the micro vibrations from peoppe walking by. Once the statue gets to a certain point, it no longer moves because the vibration not as strong.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 08:34 AM
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The problem is there is no clear information and no proper investigation.

The museum is using this to attract visitors.

So no point discussing this matter.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 08:40 AM
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reply to post by GargIndia
 


I thought you don't believe in aliens and UFO's yet you believe on possesed statues?



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by GargIndia
 


quite the opposite, they have asked for to be solved, not something you do if you are using it to attract people, and anyway whats wrong with more people going to museums ?



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by marhaba
 


I do not believe is possessed statues.

Please read my posts in this thread.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 08:51 AM
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Originally posted by Tidnabnilims
reply to post by GargIndia
 


quite the opposite, they have asked for to be solved, not something you do if you are using it to attract people, and anyway whats wrong with more people going to museums ?


Even if the base is convex (which is not apparent from the video), the statue will shift much more than rotate cleanly.

Rotating without moving on a glass shelf (from vibration) is against science.

There is no point when we do not know the facts, and the supposed investigation does not clear anything.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 08:54 AM
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it is trying to take cover from the upcoming war.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 08:58 AM
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reply to post by Signals
 


The only thing is.. how much vibration could the people make? I guess it depends on the floor and weight of thebstatue.wonder if its on a ground level floor or an upper floor?





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