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Tightrope walker. A fascination with danger?

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posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 05:50 AM
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SARASOTA, Florida (Reuters) - Dressed casually in a T-shirt, calf-length cargo pants and flip-flops, Nik Wallenda looks no different from many of the hundreds of spectators who have turned out in recent days to watch him practice for his next high-wire act.

There are no pretentious airs about him, and no spangled outfits.

"Hey, how ya doing, man?" he asked while stopping to shake the hand of a man trying to take his picture with an iPad and then pausing to high-five a few kids.

But what Wallenda is preparing for is anything but routine.

For two weeks in his hometown of Sarasota, Florida, the aerialist and holder of half a dozen world records has been practicing for what will be his biggest feat yet - a quarter-mile (400-metre) walk across the Grand Canyon on a steel cable with nothing but the Little Colorado River 1,500 feet below.

With no tethers or safety nets, the walk will be the highest tightrope attempt ever for the 34-year-old, at a height taller than the Empire State Building. It is scheduled to be shown live on June 23 on the Discovery Channel.

news.yahoo.com...

Who's going to watch this crazy man do his thing today? Do we have a voyeuristic fascination with danger? If so, why? I watched that one guy do a 22 mile (?) sky-dive from space a while back, and may watch this guy.

Why do we do it? Why does HE do it?




posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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Because he is so brainwashed by the contemporary urge of many people to become famous for 15 minutes so as to give meaning to their purposeless lives that he is willing to risk his own death in order to achieve it.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:20 AM
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Originally posted by micpsi
Because he is so brainwashed by the contemporary urge of many people to become famous for 15 minutes so as to give meaning to their purposeless lives that he is willing to risk his own death in order to achieve it.


Hasn't this always been the case? From going over Niagara Falls in a barrel, to Houdini in a tank of water, jousting in the middle ages, have we always been a spectator species when it comes to danger?



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:24 AM
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reply to post by micpsi
 


Or, my friend, he is pushing the limits and boundaries of human skill and achievement, something man has been doing since he could walk.

What pray tell have you achieved? Since you're being such a downer on this guy?
edit on 23-6-2013 by AlphaHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:25 AM
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Originally posted by micpsi
Because he is so brainwashed by the contemporary urge of many people to become famous for 15 minutes so as to give meaning to their purposeless lives that he is willing to risk his own death in order to achieve it.


No.

Read up on the ancient Uyghur tradition as a perfect example as to why your statement is wrong.


I like this kind of entertainment, I'd much prefer to see this kind of entertainment on my T.v than 99% of # that's on it.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:32 AM
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Originally posted by n00bUKI like this kind of entertainment, I'd much prefer to see this kind of entertainment on my T.v than 99% of # that's on it.


Amen to that!


Fellas like Felix Baumgartner (and assuming this guy as well) are content with the names they have created for themselves in the stunt/death defying world, they don't need any extra hype from TV, crowds, etc. Can't hurt to have that extra support though.


I don't think it has so much to do with fame, as it does with pushing the boundaries of we as a collective think is possible. This is just another obstacle in this guys path to achieving his goals/dreams.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:36 AM
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I watched a 2 hr.documentary on the family history and his practice for the canyon last night on the discovery channel.Very interesting and maybe shown again today before today's attempt.Of note he did the same walk where his great grandfather Karl died in Puerto Rico in the late 70's.His mother joined him on the wire too!I wouldn't miss this for the world.Of further note in the doc they pretty much proved that Kurt's fall was the result of an incorrect rigging of the wire by locals(not the Wallendas crew)combined with 45 MPH wind.This guy knows his stuff and will definitely be OK.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:39 AM
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"Man on Wire" -
Between the WTC buildings, 1974.

Indescribable.


It does not get any better than that. ^^



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:39 AM
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Wow the guy sure has some big brass ones, I hope he does it. Humanity is capable of such great things.
S&F Beezer



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 07:04 AM
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This stunt goes beyond publicity. It goes to family traditions. The Flying Wallendas are a family of tightrope and circus performers from way back. Once it is in the blood.........

I say good for him keeping the family name and traditions alive. Good luck!



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 11:01 AM
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For anyone interested TV coverage begins at 8pm EST on the discovery channel.Btw Geezer I totally agree with your assessment of Nick's character.He a humble Christian man with no fear of death.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 11:18 AM
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As a person who skydives, cave dives, and has dove to the near limits of maximum depths for SCUBA and umbilical dives I would say that this man is doing exactly what people such as himself and many others, including myself do.

It's not for fame, or to provide a treat to the audience of death seekers. It's to fulfill his own personal feeling of accomplishment of knowing that you have done something that you set your mind to do and achieved that intense and indescribable sensation of accomplishment of an extreme goal.

Its the feeling you get when you complete that accomplishment, that feeling of satisfaction of knowing that you succeeded in doing something that most would never even consider attempting. Is it rolling the dice with death? Well yes in a way it is and that is part of the feeling or the "high" that you feel when you know that you just accomplished your goal.

To me it has a connection with one of the most basic of human instincts, the "fight or flight" reaction. To not only face the possibility of death but to harness the fear of it, control it and succeed. You never feel as alive as when you are staring at death, the hyper sensory perception is unexplainable when all of your senses including your sense of being is so heightened that it is almost akin to enlightenment.

It's a feeling and a rush that no drug could ever instill in a person.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by TDawg61
 


Thanks for the info!

And yes, I'll be watching.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 12:45 PM
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100 years of walking-aerial performing by his family the FLYING WALLENDAS. 5 or so died together in a performance in Detroit when the pyramid stacking they were doing collapsed during a performance at the circus.

Its a family thing, not promo or craziness.

His grandfather(?) Carl Wallenda recently died during a tightrope walk on live television while walking between 2 buildings and the wind picked up pitching him to his death.

You'd have to blame the entire family as being "nuts" or not. Grandparents, parents, nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, in-laws etc. They all walk or something similar in performance. Even the grand and great-grand children.

This is what circus-family performers do.....



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 05:11 PM
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dsc.discovery.com...

Link to it if anyone is wanting to watch.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 05:25 PM
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People watch to see if he falls.... It is a fascination with death ..



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 05:25 PM
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this guys got them i dare anybody to stand on a rope a foot up never mind the drop he has s & f bunny



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by micpsi
Because he is so brainwashed by the contemporary urge of many people to become famous for 15 minutes so as to give meaning to their purposeless lives that he is willing to risk his own death in order to achieve it.

Do I detect a bit of jealousy?

You have absolutely NO clue why Nik does what he does...


Nik became the first person in history to walk over the Niagara falls on a high wire, crossing from the United States to Canada. Upon arriving in Canada, he was required to present his passport to Canadian authorities. When asked his purpose for traveling to Canada, he responded: "to inspire people around the world." en.wikipedia.org...

Nik talks about his Grand Canyon tightrope walk...


Bird's eye view of Nik's Sarasota Skywalk:


World famous daredevil Nik Wallenda attempts to walk a high wire 180 feet above beautiful downtown Sarasota, Florida. This epic stunt comes on the heels of Nik's world record walk across Niagara Falls.

POV from Nik's Highwire Pole

Nik prepares for the Grand Canyon walk:

Daredevil Nik Wallenda prepares for his Grand Canyon tightrope walk by facing 91mph winds created by air boats. The boats were stationed either side of the acrobat as he walked along a high-wire in his hometown of Sarasota, Florida. Wallenda was tethered during the practice but when it comes to the real thing, he will be following family etiquette by not having a tether or safety net.





edit on 23-6-2013 by Murgatroid because: Added link



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:04 PM
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This gives me sweaty palms just thinking about it.

It's a free country, he can kill himself if he wants to...but I will not intentionally watch someone die. I have seen enough death, thank you.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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It's not the fall

that

kills

it's

that

sudden

STOP
at the end

Wishing him all the best.

Want to add that I won't be watching. If he were to fall, it would greatly sadden me.
If he makes it, I may watch the rerun...but only if he makes it lol






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